European Geosciences Union

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Division on Natural Hazards (NH)

President: Giorgio Boni, nh@egu.eu
Deputy President: Ira Didenkulova, ira.didenkulova@msi.ttu.ee

The Natural Hazards (NH) Division of the EGU covers all the geological and geophysical processes that can be hazardous and can produce damage to the environment and to the society. Therefore it is a place where scientists and researchers of various geo-disciplines meet with sociologists, economists and people responsible for territorial and urban defense and planning policies. The aim is to improve the understanding of the evolution of the processes and to discuss new technologies, methods and strategies to mitigate their disastrous effects. The Division is structured in nine Subdivisions covering specific hazards. Of these seven are listed here: hydro-meteorological, volcanic, landslide, earthquake-, sea and ocean, snow-avalanche- and glacial, wildfire hazards. The eighth Subdivision covers biological and environmental hazards and in addition hazards not included in the previous ones. The ninth (natural hazards and society) focuses on the social aspects of the hazards, including development sustainability, emergency, warning, after-disaster resilience, etc. Most of the topics that are treated in the NH Division are also treated in other EGU Divisions, which is expected due to the intrinsic transversal nature of the NH Division. For example, earthquakes are the main interest of the Seismology Division, but they are also of interest here where the chief topics are, among others, how to evaluate vulnerability and risk, how to reduce the earthquake disastrous impact on human lives and society, how geo-scientists can contribute to a prompt recovery of a community affected by earthquake sequences…And analogous considerations can be made for the other types of the natural hazards.

The NH Division is one the historical Divisions of the EGU that was established since when EGU was founded and has been and is one of the largest divisions to which many geo-scientists provide steadily contributions of papers and ideas over the years.

As for all EGU Divisions, an Outstanding Young Scientist Award is established also for the NH Division and is given to young researchers who obtain outstanding results in the assessment and mitigation of natural hazard adopting a multidisciplinary approach. In addition, the NH Division awards the Plinius Medal devoted since 2012 to mid-career researchers and the Soloviev Medal for scientists who give outstanding contributions in fundamental aspects of research on natural hazards.

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Current issue of the EGU newsletter

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In just a couple of days, the meeting programme for the EGU 2017 General Assembly (23–28 April, Vienna) will be published online. If you have an abstract accepted to the meeting, you should receive your letter of schedule soon, too. Before then, make sure you enter the EGU Photo Competition (deadline 1 March) for a chance to win a free registration to next year's General Assembly.

For the first time, the EGU is offering a mentoring programme for novice conference attendees at its annual General Assembly to connect them with more experienced participants. The programme promises to be a rewarding experience for both mentees and mentors, so do consider signing up if you are either an early career scientist (ECS) or would like to mentor first timers!

For those interested in helping further the EGU outreach and ECS programmes, apply to be an ECS representative or be part of the EGU Outreach Committee. If you'd like to organise an EGU Galileo Conference, a meeting addressing a well-focused, cutting-edge topic at the frontier of geosciences research, this is your last chance to apply for funding from the EGU (deadline 28 February).

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