BG Biogeosciences Division on Biogeosciences

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Biogeosciences
bg.egu.eu

Division on Biogeosciences

President: Giuliana Panieri (bg@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Cornelia Rumpel (cornelia.rumpel@grignon.inra.fr)

The Division on Biogeosciences integrates biological, chemical, and physical sciences dealing with processes and interactions within terrestrial and extraterrestrial realms through the current and earlier geological history of Earth and Solar system in general. Its focus is beyond the established scientific approaches embracing multi- and interdisciplinary understandings of the Biosphere functioning in space and time. In this division, we encourage the participation of scientists across different disciplines, including researches from the field of applied Biogeosciences as well as industrial professionals. Experimental, conceptual, and modelling approaches are welcome.

Recent awardees

Pierre Friedlingstein

Pierre Friedlingstein

  • 2020
  • Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky Medal

The 2020 Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky Medal is awarded to Pierre Friedlingstein for exceptional contributions to biogeosciences in leading the quantification of the carbon-climate feedbacks in a changing world.


Caitlin E. Hicks Pries

Caitlin E. Hicks Pries

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Caitlin E. Hicks Pries for her exceptional contributions to biogeosciences in general and in particular, the terrestrial carbon cycle and the interplay of soil and plant processes with climate.


Kurt O. Konhauser

Kurt O. Konhauser

  • 2019
  • Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky Medal

The 2019 Vladimir Ivanovich Vernadsky Medal is awarded to Kurt O. Konhauser for seminal contributions to biogeosciences, in particular for exploring the role of microorganisms in mineral precipitation.


Andreas Riedl

Andreas Riedl

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Andreas Riedl Quantification of Dew and Fog Water Inputs to Swiss Grasslands


Julius Sebald

Julius Sebald

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Julius Sebald The effects of forest cover and disturbance on torrential hazards: Large-scale evidence from the Eastern Alps


Layla M. San-Emeterio

Layla M. San-Emeterio

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Layla M. San-Emeterio Pyrolysis-compound specific isotope analysis (Py-CSIA) of polymers and biopolymers: possible applications in heritage conservation


Nicole Fernandez

Nicole Fernandez

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Nicole Fernandez δ30Si – discharge relationships in small catchments spanning different climates and lithologies

Latest posts from the BG blog

Dating mineral phases in geological remnants of early life

Dating mineral phases in geological remnants of early life

This is a solicited blogpost written by Sebastian Viehmann. The Mesoarchean Strelley Pool Formation in the Pilbara Craton (Western Australia) hosts one of the oldest geological remnants of life on Earth. These silicified stromatolitic carbonates show diverse morphologies and formed on a shallow marine carbonate platform 3.35 billion years ago (Ga; Figures 1 and 2). After a long-standing debate about the biogenicity of these stromatolites starting in the 1980s, sedimentary features of the stromatolites are nowadays accepted as clearly pointing …


Phosphorus-cycle perturbations and environmental disturbances 380–360 million years ago

Phosphorus-cycle perturbations and environmental disturbances 380–360 million years ago

This is a solicited blogpost written by Lawrence Percival, who will also present his work on the Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 as part of session SSP2.1 of the upcoming EGU GA. The increasing concern regarding 21st climate change and environmental disturbance has led to a renewed focus on similar episodes of global crisis through Earth’s history. During the Late Devonian Period, 380–360 million years ago, a series of such environmental disturbances took place. These changes were characterized by times of …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Thursday 30 July marks the centennial of the birth of Marie Tharp, a pioneering geologist and cartographer whose groundbreaking scientific contributions played a key role in the eventual acceptance of the theory of plate tectonics. Tharp is best known for her detailed seafloor maps that revealed a wealth of previously unknown features, including seamounts, trenches, transform faults, and most notably, the mid-ocean ridge system.

Tharp’s story is all the more compelling due to the adversity she overcame during her career—much of it related to her gender. Because Tharp didn’t always receive credit for her work, her contributions were initially overlooked. Fortunately, Hali Felt, the author of Tharp’s biography, and others have helped correct the record. “Marie wouldn’t have chosen to experience the gender discrimination that told her the humanities were a “better fit” and forced her to work in an office rather than the field,” says Felt in a recent EGU blog, “but the result was that she found her calling closer to home, and mapped 70 percent of the Earth’s surface in the process.”

This month, EGU is celebrating Tharp’s achievements, and those of all women geoscientists, through a series of posts, including one by the Tectonics and Structural Geology Division that revisits her legacy and its importance for laying the foundations of modern geology. EGU also spoke with six researchers working in the fields of ocean science, tectonics, and mapping to ask them what Marie Tharp’s work means to them personally, as well as to the future of ocean science and tectonic research. “Her life story is a burning, guiding light for me,” says marine geographer Dawn Wright.

We hope these articles will inspire all EGU members to help one another overcome whatever adversity we face. Tharp “succeeded in building a career that she loved, and was proud of,” says structural geologist Lucia Perez Diaz. “As a woman in science, I can’t imagine a better dream to work towards.”

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