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Suguta showers (Credit: Annett Junginger, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

CL Climate: Past, Present & Future Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future
cl.egu.eu

Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future

President: Irka Hajdas (cl@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Didier Roche (didier.roche@lsce.ipsl.fr)

The Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future is one of the larger divisions of the European Geosciences Union. It pools from many disciplines and consequently has many co-organized and co-listed sessions with other divisions at the general assembly. The division is very interdisciplinary and covers climate variations on all time scales. CL includes the study of any kind of climate archive from rocks to ocean cores, speleothems, ice cores, chronicles, to instrumental records to name a few. Besides observations, climate modeling on all time scales from the deep past to the future are areas covered by the division. Any aspect of the climate system falls into the realm of the division e.g. atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, cryosphere, and geology. Themes focus on the climate on Earth but may also expand other planets or the sun.

News

Climate Scientists win Nobel Prize for Physics

Climate system is one of the most complex physical systems on this planet. To understand what changes in our climate system can trigger an event, we require excellent understanding of various sub-systems of Earth, an outstanding modelling framework that combines these sub-systems, and enormous computational power. Today we have several coupled Earth system models that can simulate the climate of our planet. This would not have been possible without the pioneering efforts of Prof. Syukuro Manabe and Prof. Klaus Hasselmann, who have driven the climate research and demonstrated that the greenhouse gas emissions is responsible for climate change. For their ground-breaking research that has helped us model and understand one of the most complex systems on this planet, both of them have been awarded 1/4th of the 2021 noble prize for Physics.

This is for the first time that climate scientists have been awarded the most prestigious award in sciences. As climate scientists, we are proud and thrilled to receive this news. The award is timely and it demonstrates the importance of climate research for society. We hope that this award will ignite and enhance public debate on climate change, which should push our leaders to take strong steps in reducing the greenhouse gas emissions, protecting the vulnerable, and ensuring a safer planet for everyone. More news can be found here: EGU press release (7.10.2021) and in a blog post of NP division

Recent awardees

Doug Smith

Doug Smith

  • 2022
  • Hans Oeschger Medal

The 2022 Hans Oeschger Medal is awarded to Doug Smith for pioneering research in mechanisms of short-term climate variations, and developing methodologies for initialising a climate model with observations to predict climate from one year to decades.


Hai Cheng

Hai Cheng

  • 2022
  • Milutin Milankovic Medal

The 2022 Milutin Milankovic Medal is awarded to Hai Cheng for pivotal contributions in speleothem palaeoclimatology, uranium series dating, and the understanding of Earth’s orbital variations in tropical climates.


Marlene Kretschmer

Marlene Kretschmer

  • 2022
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2022 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Marlene Kretschmer for outstanding development and the application of statistical methods to the study of causality in climate dynamics.


Ayako Abe-Ouchi

Ayako Abe-Ouchi

  • 2021
  • Milutin Milankovic Medal

The 2021 Milutin Milankovic Medal is awarded to Ayako Abe-Ouchi for fundamental contributions to our understanding of climate-ice sheet interactions on orbital timescales and how they shape the planetary response to Milankovic cycles.


Sonia I. Seneviratne

Sonia I. Seneviratne

  • 2021
  • Hans Oeschger Medal

The 2021 Hans Oeschger Medal is awarded to Sonia I. Seneviratne for her groundbreaking contributions to our understanding of land-climate dynamics, their relevance to weather and climate extremes, and their implications for anthropogenic climate change.


Franziska A. Lechleitner

Franziska A. Lechleitner

  • 2021
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2021 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Franziska A. Lechleitner for her contributions to the understanding of the past climate and environment as recorded in speleothems.


Cameron de Wet

Cameron de Wet

  • 2021
  • Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award

The 2021 Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award is awarded to Cameron de Wet North American rainfall patterns during past warm states: A proxy network-model comparison for the Last Interglacial and the mid-Holocene


Joanne Elkadi

Joanne Elkadi

  • 2021
  • Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award

The 2021 Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award is awarded to Joanne Elkadi Constraining past bedrock surface temperatures at the Gorner glacier, Switzerland, using feldspar thermoluminescence for surface paleothermometry

Latest posts from the CL blog

How glaciers record the winds of change

After decades of observation, one of the profound consequences of anthropogenic global warming is the rapid rise in temperature in the Arctic, refered to as Arctic Amplification. Compared to the mid-latitudes, warming in the Arctic is twice as fast. The reason is mainly due to the positive feedback of a melting cryosphere: Darker surfaces are revealed from melting cryosphere, reflecting less shortwave radiation (sunlight) which gets absorbed and converted to longwave radiation (heat). Those darker surfaces can either be land …


Don’t miss out on these awesome #EGU22 activities!

Dear climate enthusiasts, EGU lovers, and early/senior climate scientists, With #EGU22 approaching, we wanted to give you a quick overview of the great short courses and great debates that are planned for this years’ General Assembly! If you want to learn more about the scientific sessions offered, please have a look at our Seasonal love letter from December. Short Courses If you are about to finish your Ph.D. and are not sure where the road ahead leads, don’t miss out …


Parenting in Academia: Challenges and Perspectives

Trying to juggle teaching, advising, publishing, finding a new (or permanent) job, relocating, attending conferences, and actually doing research sometimes requires more hours in the day than exist (oh and that global pandemic situation is sticking around). Additionally, many scientists have children or are starting a family at the same time as maintaining and building a career. In this week’s blog post, we asked 15 scientists about their experience of parenting whilst maintaining a career in research. We highlight the …


Life of a Climate Scientists presents: Dr. Kaja Fenn

About the blog series: Life of a Climate scientist Life of a Climate Scientist is a new blog series started by the EGU Climate Division. The main focus of this series is to provide a platform for climate scientists to tell their stories of life in research. We will be covering a wide-range of subjects, from their scientific endeavors and maintaining work-life balance to challenges they have faced during their career path and the pandemic. Introducing Dr. Kaja Fenn EGU …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

In the April issue of The Loupe, Earth day is in the spotlight amidst the looming climate change crisis. Find out how EGU and fourteen other geoscience organisations around the world have committed to create a just and sustainable future for the planet. As EGU’s Early Career Scientist (ECS) Representative, Anita Di Chiara explains how ECS can get more involved in EGU and the scientific community.

A few weeks to go for EGU22, which takes place from 23-27 May 2022! Registration for on-site participation has now closed, however you can still register to join us virtually till 27 May 2022.

This issue also highlights some of the key science for policy sessions at EGU22, and includes the latest Journal Watch and GeoRoundup of April EGU journal highlights.

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