CL Climate: Past, Present & Future Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future
cl.egu.eu

Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future

President: Didier Roche (cl@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Irka Hajdas (hajdas@phys.ethz.ch)

The Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future is one of the larger divisions of the European Geosciences Union. It pools from many disciplines and consequently has many co-organized and co-listed sessions with other divisions at the general assembly. The division is very interdisciplinary and covers climate variations on all time scales. CL includes the study of any kind of climate archive from rocks to ocean cores, speleothems, ice cores, chronicles, to instrumental records to name a few. Besides observations, climate modeling on all time scales from the deep past to the future are areas covered by the division. Any aspect of the climate system falls into the realm of the division e.g. atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, cryosphere, and geology. Themes focus on the climate on Earth but may also expand other planets or the sun.

Recent awardees

Kim M. Cobb

Kim M. Cobb

  • 2020
  • Hans Oeschger Medal

The 2020 Hans Oeschger Medal is awarded to Kim M. Cobb for pioneering acquisition and interpretation of high-resolution observations from corals and cave deposits in Earth’s equatorial regions and their implications for climate change.


Valérie Masson-Delmotte

Valérie Masson-Delmotte

  • 2020
  • Milutin Milankovic Medal

The 2020 Milutin Milankovic Medal is awarded to Valérie Masson-Delmotte for outstanding contributions to research on long-term climate change, namely palaeotemperature records from ice cores, and for her leadership in international efforts to translate science to society.


François Massonnet

François Massonnet

  • 2020
  • Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists

The 2020 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists is awarded to François Massonnet for his significant contribution to polar climate prediction, projection and reanalyses, including original integration of model and data evidence.


Edward J. Brook

Edward J. Brook

  • 2019
  • Hans Oeschger Medal

The 2019 Hans Oeschger Medal is awarded to Edward J. Brook for producing greenhouse-gas records from polar ice cores in unprecedented resolution that permitted the precise north-south synchronisation of climate signals and the identification of past variations in great detail.


Jacques Laskar

Jacques Laskar

  • 2019
  • Milutin Milankovic Medal

The 2019 Milutin Milankovic Medal is awarded to Jacques Laskar for fundamental contributions to the investigation of orbital climate forcing, and for the development of long-term, reliable astronomical solutions important for the whole palaeoclimate community.


Aline Mega

Aline Mega

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Aline Mega Highly variable surface-water conditions off southern Portugal during mid-Pleistocene Marine Isotope Stages 20 to 26 (790 – 970 ky)


Bernat Jiménez-Esteve

Bernat Jiménez-Esteve

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Bernat Jiménez-Esteve Nonlinearity in the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric response to a linear ENSO forcing


Iulia-Madalina Streanga

Iulia-Madalina Streanga

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Iulia-Madalina Streanga A calibration study of Sr/Ca ratios and δ18O to sea surface temperature and salinity in the West Pacific Warm Pool


Livia Manser

Livia Manser

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Livia Manser Neogene evolution of paleoenvironments in the North American Great Plains from a stable isotope study


Nicholas Leach

Nicholas Leach

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Nicholas Leach Current level and rate of warming determine emissions budgets under ambitious mitigation


Amanda C. Maycock

Amanda C. Maycock

  • 2019
  • Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists

The 2019 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists is awarded to Amanda C. Maycock for significant and original contributions to the understanding of the influence of stratospheric processes on climate at temporal scales from seasons to centuries.

Latest posts from the CL blog

Hurricane COVID-19: What can COVID-19 tell us about tackling climate change?

Hurricane COVID-19: What can COVID-19 tell us about tackling climate change?

Note by the editors: In the unique period our world is currently facing, we have decided to open our blog to hear the voices of our young climate scientists from around the globe. This is an opinion piece provided by two early career climatologists from Argentina and the Netherlands. I just arrived at home with a bunch of groceries from the supermarket after encountering some very empty shelves. I have bought lots of tinned food that should provide enough for …


Weather hidden within dusty parchments and weighty tomes—historical climatology and its contribution to our understanding of the past climate

Weather hidden within dusty parchments and weighty tomes—historical climatology and its contribution to our understanding of the past climate

What is historical climatology? Historical climatology is an interdisciplinary research field between paleoclimatology and the historical sciences, that explores the archives of societies to examine the climate of the past. Archives of society mean all man-made remains of the past in contrast to archives of nature. The latter represent physical remains of natural processes such as tree rings and sediments.1 Man-made remains of the past are paintings, buildings or written documents like books, letter and accounts. In this blog post, …


Are the risks of zoonotic diseases rising in the Anthropocene due to climate change?

Are the risks of zoonotic diseases rising in the Anthropocene due to climate change?

The recent coronavirus outbreak (i.e., nCovID-19; Fig. 1) has caused global panic, along with widespread travel bans, home quarantines and country-wide lockdowns. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared nCoVID-19 as a pandemic as of March 11th, 2020 (WHO, 2020). To tackle this global health crisis, scientists are attempting to synthesize a vaccine, while countries are trying to mitigate the number of infections by isolating infected patients and vulnerable populations. However, nCovID-19 is not the only zoonotic disease that has caused …


Dead Sea – lively stories of the past

Dead Sea – lively stories of the past

The Dead Sea is dead. Nothing can live there except for specialized microbes. The water with a salinity multiple times higher than seawater prevents a colonization by higher life forms. However, it does not prevent the input of organic material that can tell us stories about the past. A unique sediment record The Dead Sea, located at the lowest elevation on Earth – currently about 430 m below sea level, is the largest lake of the Levant (Eastern Mediterranean). The …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

This month EGU issued an important statement condemning racism—and all other forms of discrimination—anywhere in the world and re-asserting our commitment to improving equality of opportunity, diversity and inclusion both within and beyond the geosciences.

A crucial component of anti-racism is sustaining a productive conversation about issues related to equality, diversity and inclusion. In keeping with EGU’s bottom-up structure and philosophy, we welcome diverse voices and opinions and encourage all geoscientists to constructively express their thoughts. In response to recent events, numerous individuals and groups have done so, including:

In celebration of Pride Month, EGU also published an article about risks to safety and other issues that LGBTQIA+ geoscientists face while conducting fieldwork in certain countries.

Since EGU’s founding, the organisation has worked to ensure equitable treatment for everyone in our community. Through our Equality, Diversity and Inclusion working group, we are working towards our stated goals to increase diversity at EGU events and on EGU committees and boards, and we pledge to continue to foster diversity to advance fundamental and applied geoscience research—to the benefit of the Earth and all humanity.

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