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Suguta showers (Credit: Annett Junginger, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

CL Climate: Past, Present & Future Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future
cl.egu.eu

Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future

President: Irka Hajdas (cl@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Didier Roche (didier.roche@lsce.ipsl.fr)

The Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future is one of the larger divisions of the European Geosciences Union. It pools from many disciplines and consequently has many co-organized and co-listed sessions with other divisions at the general assembly. The division is very interdisciplinary and covers climate variations on all time scales. CL includes the study of any kind of climate archive from rocks to ocean cores, speleothems, ice cores, chronicles, to instrumental records to name a few. Besides observations, climate modeling on all time scales from the deep past to the future are areas covered by the division. Any aspect of the climate system falls into the realm of the division e.g. atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, cryosphere, and geology. Themes focus on the climate on Earth but may also expand other planets or the sun.

News

Climate Scientists win Nobel Prize for Physics

Climate system is one of the most complex physical systems on this planet. To understand what changes in our climate system can trigger an event, we require excellent understanding of various sub-systems of Earth, an outstanding modelling framework that combines these sub-systems, and enormous computational power. Today we have several coupled Earth system models that can simulate the climate of our planet. This would not have been possible without the pioneering efforts of Prof. Syukuro Manabe and Prof. Klaus Hasselmann, who have driven the climate research and demonstrated that the greenhouse gas emissions is responsible for climate change. For their ground-breaking research that has helped us model and understand one of the most complex systems on this planet, both of them have been awarded 1/4th of the 2021 noble prize for Physics.

This is for the first time that climate scientists have been awarded the most prestigious award in sciences. As climate scientists, we are proud and thrilled to receive this news. The award is timely and it demonstrates the importance of climate research for society. We hope that this award will ignite and enhance public debate on climate change, which should push our leaders to take strong steps in reducing the greenhouse gas emissions, protecting the vulnerable, and ensuring a safer planet for everyone. More news can be found here: EGU press release (7.10.2021) and in a blog post of NP division

Recent awardees

Ayako Abe-Ouchi

Ayako Abe-Ouchi

  • 2021
  • Milutin Milankovic Medal

The 2021 Milutin Milankovic Medal is awarded to Ayako Abe-Ouchi for fundamental contributions to our understanding of climate-ice sheet interactions on orbital timescales and how they shape the planetary response to Milankovic cycles.


Sonia I. Seneviratne

Sonia I. Seneviratne

  • 2021
  • Hans Oeschger Medal

The 2021 Hans Oeschger Medal is awarded to Sonia I. Seneviratne for her groundbreaking contributions to our understanding of land-climate dynamics, their relevance to weather and climate extremes, and their implications for anthropogenic climate change.


Franziska A. Lechleitner

Franziska A. Lechleitner

  • 2021
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2021 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Franziska A. Lechleitner for her contributions to the understanding of the past climate and environment as recorded in speleothems.


Cameron de Wet

Cameron de Wet

  • 2021
  • Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award

The 2021 Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award is awarded to Cameron de Wet North American rainfall patterns during past warm states: A proxy network-model comparison for the Last Interglacial and the mid-Holocene


Joanne Elkadi

Joanne Elkadi

  • 2021
  • Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award

The 2021 Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award is awarded to Joanne Elkadi Constraining past bedrock surface temperatures at the Gorner glacier, Switzerland, using feldspar thermoluminescence for surface paleothermometry

Latest posts from the CL blog

Parenting in Academia: Challenges and Perspectives

Trying to juggle teaching, advising, publishing, finding a new (or permanent) job, relocating, attending conferences, and actually doing research sometimes requires more hours in the day than exist (oh and that global pandemic situation is sticking around). Additionally, many scientists have children or are starting a family at the same time as maintaining and building a career. In this week’s blog post, we asked 15 scientists about their experience of parenting whilst maintaining a career in research. We highlight the …


Life of a Climate Scientists presents: Dr. Kaja Fenn

About the blog series: Life of a Climate scientist Life of a Climate Scientist is a new blog series started by the EGU Climate Division. The main focus of this series is to provide a platform for climate scientists to tell their stories of life in research. We will be covering a wide-range of subjects, from their scientific endeavors and maintaining work-life balance to challenges they have faced during their career path and the pandemic. Introducing Dr. Kaja Fenn EGU …


Seasonal love letter

Dear Climate enthusiasts, dear EGU lovers, dear early and senior climate scientists, I write to you in the second of two very challenging years for each and everyone of us. We faced many difficulties, hardships, and maybe even some opportunities and it is the time of the year to reflect on that. For geoscientists it is also the time of the year to plan the next conferences and consider what to submit to the next EGU General Assembly, which will …


High school-University Connection: Teaching experiences in rural communities regarding climate change

Understanding how our environment is changing under a warmer climate will be one of the new challenges our children will face. Meanwhile, teachers are challenged to seek new pedagogical strategies for teaching climate change in the youngest, especially in rural communities, which are one of the most vulnerable to climate change impacts, as they lack resilience towards surviving extreme events. Although in recent years have seen significant advances in teaching climate science to high school students of Colombian cities, students …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

In the December issue of The Loupe we learn about the vital importance of mountain glaciers with Harry Zekollari in this month’s special webinar Vanishing Glaciers and seak to ECS Cryosphere Division blogger Larissa van der Laan about her work on glaciers and how she uses science-art in her career as a researcher and artist.

You can also watch the free recording of our special webinar about Digitalk:online (geo)science communication, available now on our YouTube channel.

Don’t forget to submit your abstract for EGU22, which is still intended to be held as a hybrid event 3 – 8 April 2022! Find out more here as well as information about the registration fees and submit your abstract by 12 January 2022 at 13.00 CET.

In addition this issue also shares the latest Journal Watch and GeoRoundup of December EGU journal highlights.

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