Suguta showers (Credit: Annett Junginger, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

CL Climate: Past, Present & Future Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future
cl.egu.eu

Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future

President: Didier Roche (cl@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Irka Hajdas (hajdas@phys.ethz.ch)

The Division on Climate: Past, Present & Future is one of the larger divisions of the European Geosciences Union. It pools from many disciplines and consequently has many co-organized and co-listed sessions with other divisions at the general assembly. The division is very interdisciplinary and covers climate variations on all time scales. CL includes the study of any kind of climate archive from rocks to ocean cores, speleothems, ice cores, chronicles, to instrumental records to name a few. Besides observations, climate modeling on all time scales from the deep past to the future are areas covered by the division. Any aspect of the climate system falls into the realm of the division e.g. atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, cryosphere, and geology. Themes focus on the climate on Earth but may also expand other planets or the sun.

News

Obituary: John Kutzbach

EGU is saddened to report the death of John Kutzbach, a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and former Director of the Center for Climatic Research at University of Wisconsin-Madison. Kutzbach was awarded EGU’s Milankovich Medal in 2001 for his “pioneering and outstanding contributions towards the understanding of the response of the climate system to astronomical forcing using three-dimensional ocean-atmosphere models”.

The following tribute was written by Bette Otto-Bliesner in his honour:

Kutzbach’s career centered around using climate models to study previous as well as future climates. His colleagues at the university shared that “Professor Kutzbach’s pioneering use of general circulation models for climate research broke ground for future generations of climate scientists to study past, present, and future aspects of our Earth system. His interdisciplinary work with geologists, geochemists, palaeoecologists, glaciologists, archaeologists, and hydrologists helped identify, and ultimately improve, the quality of the output of the climate models that current Earth system scientists use to develop climate projections."

In recent years, Kutzbach’s work has focused on the impacts of climate and climate change on natural resources and society; past climates and past environments; how humans have contributed to climate change; and present-day climate variability and simulations of future climate changes.

In 2006, AGU awarded Kutzbach the Roger Revelle Medal, citing his body of work that “forms a large part of the framework of our current understanding of past climates”. He was a member of the National Academy of Sciences and Fellow of AGU, AMS, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

John is survived by his wife, Professor Gisela Hanebuth Kutzbach, their three children, and six grandchildren.
On a personal note, John started me, soon after my PhD, on modeling past climates, a rewarding focus that has taken me down a path of many new and intriguing challenges and exciting interdisciplinary collaborations. He was a mentor, a colleague, and a friend.

Bette Otto-Bliesner
National Center for Atmospheric Research

Recent awardees

Ayako Abe-Ouchi

Ayako Abe-Ouchi

  • 2021
  • Milutin Milankovic Medal

The 2021 Milutin Milankovic Medal is awarded to Ayako Abe-Ouchi for fundamental contributions to our understanding of climate-ice sheet interactions on orbital timescales and how they shape the planetary response to Milankovic cycles.


Sonia I. Seneviratne

Sonia I. Seneviratne

  • 2021
  • Hans Oeschger Medal

The 2021 Hans Oeschger Medal is awarded to Sonia I. Seneviratne for her groundbreaking contributions to our understanding of land-climate dynamics, their relevance to weather and climate extremes, and their implications for anthropogenic climate change.


Franziska A. Lechleitner

Franziska A. Lechleitner

  • 2021
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2021 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Franziska A. Lechleitner for her contributions to the understanding of the past climate and environment as recorded in speleothems.


Kim M. Cobb

Kim M. Cobb

  • 2020
  • Hans Oeschger Medal

The 2020 Hans Oeschger Medal is awarded to Kim M. Cobb for pioneering acquisition and interpretation of high-resolution observations from corals and cave deposits in Earth’s equatorial regions and their implications for climate change.


Valérie Masson-Delmotte

Valérie Masson-Delmotte

  • 2020
  • Milutin Milankovic Medal

The 2020 Milutin Milankovic Medal is awarded to Valérie Masson-Delmotte for outstanding contributions to research on long-term climate change, namely palaeotemperature records from ice cores, and for her leadership in international efforts to translate science to society.


François Massonnet

François Massonnet

  • 2020
  • Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists

The 2020 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists is awarded to François Massonnet for his significant contribution to polar climate prediction, projection and reanalyses, including original integration of model and data evidence.

Latest posts from the CL blog


Life of a Climate Scientist

Life of a Climate Scientist

Dear readers of the EGU Climate: Past, present and future blog. We hope you are having a good start to the New Year. Last year we faced a multitude of challenges due to the pandemic. Hopefully, by the end of 2021, the vaccination campaign will help combat the pandemic, and allow us to go back to some semblance of normality; fingers crossed! About Climate scientists Climate scientists investigate Earth’s Climate at local, regional and global scales utilizing a wide variety …


Highlighting climate sessions at vEGU21: Gather Online

With the abstract deadline at 13th January, we would like to highlight some of the fantastic sessions that are offered in the climate division in 2021. Due to the large amount of offered sessions, we focus in this overview on EDI sessions. EDI stands for equality, diversity, and inclusion and the EDI logo highlights sessions that include conveners from multiple countries and institutes, different career stages, and more than one form of gender identity. More info can be found here. …


Presenting the EGU climate divisions´ outreach team

Presenting the EGU climate divisions´ outreach team

For our seasonal greetings this year, we would like to present the outreach team of the climate division. Our team has grown after the last EGU assembly, and this was highly visible in our increased number of blog postings throughout the year. We published 14 post in total! The team is responsible for writing and editing blog posts as well as finding motivated guest writers. We try to address all different topics of past, present and future climate to give …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

In February The Loupe celebrates this month’s three successful missions to Mars, including the unique science and symbolism of the first Arab mission to the Red Planet. Because the data from this mission will be openly shared, it lets all scientists embark on an exciting journey to explore the secrets of our neighbouring planet’s atmosphere together. This issue features three EGU divisions: Geosciences Instrumentation and Data Systems (GI), Planetary and Solar System Sciences (PS), and Solar-Terrestrial Sciences (ST).

The Loupe also highlights everything you need to know about the vEGU21 scientific sessions, 5 key new initiatives the Union implemented in 2020, and two blogs with lighthearted tips for a greener EGU21 and some lessons you can take from this year’s virtual General Assembly to make your in-person conferences greener.

In addition to the latest Journal Watch and GeoRoundup of February EGU journal highlights, this issue also looks at what Union leaders hope they can achieve in the next few years and tackles the ‘rotten’ topic of how Europe should deal with its waste.

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