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European Geosciences Union

Division on Cryospheric Sciences
cr.egu.eu

Division on Cryospheric Sciences

President: Olaf Eisen (cr@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Carleen Tijm-Reijmer (c.h.tijm-reijmer@uu.nl)

The Cryosphere are those parts of the Earth and other planetary bodies that are subject to prolonged periods of temperatures below the freezing point of water. These include glaciers, frozen ground, sea ice, snow and ice. One of the main aims of the EGU Division on Cryospheric Sciences is to facilitate the exchange of information within the science community. It does so by organizing series of sessions at the annual EGU assembly, and through the publishing of the open-access journal `The Cryosphere’. The division awards the Louis Agassiz medal for outstanding contributions to the science of the cryosphere.

Recent awardees

Andreas Kääb

Andreas Kääb

  • 2019
  • Louis Agassiz Medal

The 2019 Louis Agassiz Medal is awarded to Andreas Kääb for innovative and multidisciplinary contributions to the field of remote sensing of the cryosphere, with applications in glacier mass balance, permafrost and geohazards.


Frank Pattyn

Frank Pattyn

  • 2018
  • Louis Agassiz Medal

The 2018 Louis Agassiz Medal is awarded to Frank Pattyn for his unsurpassed contributions to the understanding of large-scale ice-sheet dynamics and his leadership in the internationally coordinated efforts to improve ice-sheet models.


Fanny Brun

Fanny Brun

  • 2018
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2018 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Fanny Brun Can ice cliffs explain the “debris-cover anomaly”? New insights from Changri Nup Glacier, Nepal


Sandra Vázquez-Martín

Sandra Vázquez-Martín

  • 2018
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2018 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Sandra Vázquez-Martín Ground-based in-situ snowfall speed measurements: Microphysical properties of snowflakes

Latest posts from the CR blog

Image of the Week -- Cavity leads to complexity

Image of the Week -- Cavity leads to complexity

A 10km-long, 4-km-wide and 350m-high cavity has recently been discovered under one of the fastest-flowing glaciers in Antarctica using different airborne and satellite techniques (see this press release and this study). This enormous cavity previously contained 14 billion tons of ice and formed between 2011 and 2016. This indicates that the bottom of the big glaciers on Earth can melt faster than expected, with the potential to raise sea level more quickly than we thought. Let’s see in further details …


Image of the Week - Cryo Connect presents: The top 50 media-covered cryosphere papers of 2018

Image of the Week - Cryo Connect presents: The top 50 media-covered cryosphere papers of 2018

Discover which cryospheric research articles were most successful in attracting media attention in 2018 according to the Altmetric score. Cryo Connect and Altmetric Scientists are generally aware of each others’ studies. But when a scientific study generates media interest, its impact can be boosted beyond the scientific community. The media can push the essence of scientific study to the broader public through newspapers and news websites, television and social media. It all counts, and Altmetric tracks mentions of scientific studies …


A brief guide to Navigating EGU 2019!

A brief guide to Navigating EGU 2019!

Are you going to the EGU General Assembly in Vienna next week? If so, read on for a quick guide to navigating the week: Where to start, what to see and how to meet people and enjoy yourself! After all, the meeting is as much about the opportunities to meet scientists from all over the world as it is about the science itself. How on Earth do I know what is going on?! The EGU General Assembly (GA) is a …


Image of the Week - 5th Snow Science Winter School

Image of the Week - 5th Snow Science Winter School

From February 17th to 23rd, 21 graduate students and postdoctorate researchers from around the world made their way to Hailuoto, a small island on the coast of Finland, to spend a week learning about snow on sea-ice for the 5th Snow Science Winter School. The course, jointly organized by the Finnish Meteorological Institute and the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL, brought together a wide range of scientists interested in snow: climate modellers, large-scale hydrologists, snow …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

With the EGU General Assembly just over a week away, we have a number of updates on the meeting, happening in Vienna from 7–12 April. We have announced that Former Italian Prime Minister and European Commissioner Mario Monti and Former Italian Parliamentarian Ilaria Capua will be at the EGU meeting, participating in a conversation with geoscientists on ‘Science, Politics and European (dis)integration’. We have also recently announced a number of measures to reduce the environmental impact of the conference: we encourage all participants to offset their carbon footprint from travelling to Vienna and to bring their own coffee cup and water bottle to the meeting, to reduce the number of disposable items used. Follow the links under the ‘General Assembly’ section below for more information about the EGU meeting.

This month, we have also announced that we are accepting nominations for EGU awards and medals. We encourage the EGU membership to consider gender, geographical and cultural balance when nominating outstanding Earth, planetary and space scientists at various career stages.

Stay tuned to https://www.egu.eu next week for an announcement about a new EGU journal!

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