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European Geosciences Union

Division on Cryospheric Sciences
cr.egu.eu

Division on Cryospheric Sciences

President: Olaf Eisen (cr@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Carleen Tijm-Reijmer (c.h.tijm-reijmer@uu.nl)

The Cryosphere are those parts of the Earth and other planetary bodies that are subject to prolonged periods of temperatures below the freezing point of water. These include glaciers, frozen ground, sea ice, snow and ice. One of the main aims of the EGU Division on Cryospheric Sciences is to facilitate the exchange of information within the science community. It does so by organizing series of sessions at the annual EGU assembly, and through the publishing of the open-access journal `The Cryosphere’. The division awards the Louis Agassiz medal for outstanding contributions to the science of the cryosphere.

Recent awardees

Frank Pattyn

Frank Pattyn

  • 2018
  • Louis Agassiz Medal

The 2018 Louis Agassiz Medal is awarded to Frank Pattyn for his unsurpassed contributions to the understanding of large-scale ice-sheet dynamics and his leadership in the internationally coordinated efforts to improve ice-sheet models.


Eric Rignot

Eric Rignot

  • 2017
  • Louis Agassiz Medal

The 2017 Louis Agassiz Medal is awarded to Eric Rignot for fundamental innovations in the remote sensing of glacier flow, leading to the first assessments of the mass balance of the ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland.


Ricarda Winkelmann

Ricarda Winkelmann

  • 2017
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award

The 2017 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award is awarded to Ricarda Winkelmann for her innovative contributions to glaciology and the study of the interactions between climate and glaciation.


Flavien Beaud

Flavien Beaud

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Flavien Beaud Numerical modelling of esker formation in semi-circular subglacial channels


Louis Quéno

Louis Quéno

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Louis Quéno Forecasting and modelling ice layer formation on the snowpack due to freezing precipitation in the Pyrenees

Latest posts from the CR blog

Image of the Week - Stuck in the ice: could have it been predicted?

Image of the Week - Stuck in the ice: could have it been predicted?

Expeditions in the Southern Ocean are invaluable opportunities to learn more about this fascinating but remote region of the world. However, sending vessels to navigate the hostile Antarctic waters is an expensive endeavor, not only financially but also from a human perspective. When vessels are forced to turn back due to hazardous conditions or, even worse, become stuck in the ice (as shown in our Image of the Week), a mission full of expectations can quickly turn into a nightmare. …


Image of the Week - The future of Antarctic ice shelves

Image of the Week - The future of Antarctic ice shelves

Climate change will increase ice shelf melting around Antarctica. That’s the not-very-surprising conclusion of a recent modelling study, resulting from a collaboration between Australian and German researchers. Here’s the less intuitive result: much of the projected melting is actually linked to a decrease in sea ice formation. Learn why in our Image of the Week… Different types of Antarctic ice Sea ice is just frozen seawater. But ice shelves (as well as ice sheets and icebergs) are originally formed of …


Image of the Week – Making waves: assessing supraglacial water storage for debris-covered glaciers

Image of the Week – Making waves: assessing supraglacial water storage for debris-covered glaciers

A creeping flux of ice descends Everest, creating the dynamic environment of Khumbu Glacier. Ice and snow tumble, debris slumps, ice cliffs melt, englacial cavities collapse, ponds form and drain, all responding to a variable energy balance. Indeed, Khumbu Glacier is a debris-covered glacier, meaning it features a layer of sediment, rocks and house-sized boulders that covers the ice beneath. Recent advances in understanding debris-covered glacier hydrology come from combining in situ surveys with remotely sensed satellite data. Khumbu Glacier …


Image of the Week – Climate feedbacks demystified in polar regions

Image of the Week – Climate feedbacks demystified in polar regions

Over the recent decades, the Arctic has warmed twice as fast as the whole globe. This stronger warming, called “Arctic Amplification”, especially occurs in the Arctic because ice, ocean and atmosphere interact strongly, sometimes amplifying the warming, sometimes reducing it. These interactions are called “feedbacks” and are illustrated in our Image of the Week. Let’s see why these feedbacks are important, how we can measure them and what their implications are. Climate feedbacks in polar regions When it comes to …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

This month we are highlighting two new studies published in EGU journals. One, published in The Cryosphere, shows how much sea level would rise following the collapse of two Antarctic ice shelves. The other, featured in Biogeosciences, shows that oxygen loss in the coastal Baltic Sea over the past century is unprecedented in the last 1500 years. You can read the press releases for both studies on the EGU website.

Also this month, we have opened the call for candidates for EGU Treasurer: if you'd like to nominate yourself or propose a candidate, you can do so by 15 September.

Finally, if you'd like to apply for financial support from the EGU to organise a meeting, make sure to submit an application by 15 August. This is also the deadline to submit proposals for Union Symposia and Great Debates at the EGU 2019 General Assembly. The deadline for scientific sessions is 6 September.

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