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European Geosciences Union

Division on Cryospheric Sciences
cr.egu.eu

Division on Cryospheric Sciences

President: Olaf Eisen (cr@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Carleen Tijm-Reijmer (c.h.tijm-reijmer@uu.nl)

The Cryosphere are those parts of the Earth and other planetary bodies that are subject to prolonged periods of temperatures below the freezing point of water. These include glaciers, frozen ground, sea ice, snow and ice. One of the main aims of the EGU Division on Cryospheric Sciences is to facilitate the exchange of information within the science community. It does so by organizing series of sessions at the annual EGU assembly, and through the publishing of the open-access journal `The Cryosphere’. The division awards the Louis Agassiz medal for outstanding contributions to the science of the cryosphere.

Recent awardees

Frank Pattyn

Frank Pattyn

  • 2018
  • Louis Agassiz Medal

The 2018 Louis Agassiz Medal is awarded to Frank Pattyn for his unsurpassed contributions to the understanding of large-scale ice-sheet dynamics and his leadership in the internationally coordinated efforts to improve ice-sheet models.


Eric Rignot

Eric Rignot

  • 2017
  • Louis Agassiz Medal

The 2017 Louis Agassiz Medal is awarded to Eric Rignot for fundamental innovations in the remote sensing of glacier flow, leading to the first assessments of the mass balance of the ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland.


Ricarda Winkelmann

Ricarda Winkelmann

  • 2017
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award

The 2017 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award is awarded to Ricarda Winkelmann for her innovative contributions to glaciology and the study of the interactions between climate and glaciation.


Flavien Beaud

Flavien Beaud

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Flavien Beaud Numerical modelling of esker formation in semi-circular subglacial channels


Louis Quéno

Louis Quéno

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Louis Quéno Forecasting and modelling ice layer formation on the snowpack due to freezing precipitation in the Pyrenees

Latest posts from the CR blog

Image of the Week – Antarctica: A decade of dynamic change

Image of the Week – Antarctica: A decade of dynamic change

Whilst we tend to think of the ice flow in Antarctica as a very slow and steady process, the wonders of satellites have shown over the last two decades it is one of the most dynamic places on Earth! This image of the week maps this dynamical change using all the satellite tools at a scientist’s disposal with novel statistical methods to work out why the change has recently been so rapid. Why do we care about dynamic changes in …


Image of the Week — Biscuits in the Permafrost

Image of the Week — Biscuits in the Permafrost

In Svalbard, the snow melts to reveal a mysterious honeycomb network of irregular shapes (fig. 1). These shapes may look as though they have been created by a rogue baker with an unusual set of biscuit cutters, but they are in fact distinctive permafrost landforms known as ice-wedge polygons, and they play an important role in the global climate. Ice-wedge polygons: Nature’s biscuit-cutter In winter, cracks form when plummeting air temperatures cause the ground to cool and contract. O’Neill and …


Image of the Week - Cure from the Cold?

Image of the Week - Cure from the Cold?

Humans rely on antibiotics for survival, but over time they are becoming less effective. So-called ‘superbugs’ are developing resistance to our most important drugs. The key to this global issue may be found in the cryosphere, where extreme microbiologists are hunting for new compounds in the cold that could help us win the war against antimicrobial resistance. Discovering drugs in Earth’s coldest places Antimicrobial resistance poses a global threat predicted to cause 10 million deaths per year by 2050. Alexander …


Image of the Week - Why is ice colourful?

Image of the Week - Why is ice colourful?

When you think of glacier ice, what colour first springs to mind? Maybe white, blue or transparent? Well, glacier ice can, in fact, be mesmerising and multi-coloured! Our image of the week shows thin sections of glacier ice under polarised light. These sections were cut from block samples of two Alpine glaciers in Switzerland (Chli Titlis and Grenzgletscher). In these images the individual ice crystals (Fig. 1 ) can be easily distinguished due to the different colours (see previous post …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Earlier this month, we hosted a record-breaking number of participants (over 15,000) at our annual EGU General Assembly in Vienna. The meeting included over 17,000 poster, oral and PICO presentations in over 650 sessions, as well as a number of popular short courses and side events. We are grateful to all participants, including conveners, the EGU Programme Committee, Copernicus Meetings, conference assistants, and ACV and EGU office staff, for making the meeting a success.

If you participated in the meeting, we especially welcome your suggestions and feedback (deadline: 3 June), which will be instrumental in ensuring an even more successful General Assembly in 2019 (7–12 April, Vienna).

Finally, we would like to remind you that we are currently accepting nominations for the 2019 EGU awards and medals. To promote the best deserving geoscientists from around the world and increase diversity in the group of EGU awardees and medallists, we encourage the EGU membership to consider gender, geographical, and cultural balance when nominating outstanding Earth, planetary and space scientists at various career stages. Please consider submitting a nomination by 15 June.

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