Bluesy glacier (Credit: Velio Coviello, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

CR Cryospheric Sciences Division on Cryospheric Sciences

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Cryospheric Sciences
cr.egu.eu

Division on Cryospheric Sciences

President: Olaf Eisen (cr@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Carleen Tijm-Reijmer (c.h.tijm-reijmer@uu.nl)

The Cryosphere are those parts of the Earth and other planetary bodies that are subject to prolonged periods of temperatures below the freezing point of water. These include glaciers, frozen ground, sea ice, snow and ice. One of the main aims of the EGU Division on Cryospheric Sciences is to facilitate the exchange of information within the science community. It does so by organizing series of sessions at the annual EGU assembly, and through the publishing of the open-access journal `The Cryosphere’. The division awards the Julia and Johannes Weertman medal for outstanding contributions to the science of the cryosphere.


 

Recent awardees

Martyn Tranter

Martyn Tranter

  • 2021
  • Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal

The 2021 Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal is awarded to Martyn Tranter for his outstanding fundamental contributions in the innovative and emerging field of glacial biogeochemistry, leading to the paradigm shift in recognizing bio-albedo effects.


Christine L. Batchelor

Christine L. Batchelor

  • 2021
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2021 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Christine L. Batchelor for her contributions to cryospheric sciences by her studies on glacial history and palaeo-ice sheet reconstructions.


Julienne C. Stroeve

Julienne C. Stroeve

  • 2020
  • Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal

The 2020 Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal is awarded to Julienne C. Stroeve for her fundamental contributions to improved satellite observations of sea ice, better understanding of causes of sea ice variability and change, and her compelling communication to the wider public.


Anna E. Hogg

Anna E. Hogg

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Anna E. Hogg for outstanding research in the field of satellite remote sensing of the cryosphere and her contributions to science communications.

Latest posts from the CR blog

On snowmelt, water security, and a warming climate – Why solution-oriented research matters, now more than ever

On snowmelt, water security, and a warming climate – Why solution-oriented research matters, now more than ever

1 April 2015: for the first time on record, the chief of the California Cooperative Snow Surveys, Frank Gehrke, had no snow to measure at the Phillips Snow Course near Lake Tahoe at the end of the winter. This was in some ways unsurprising, as California had been in a drought since 2012. But drought was nothing new in the state, and this was the first time on record that snow was completely absent on this critical date. In the …


The new glacial geomorphological map from New Zealand

The new glacial geomorphological map from New Zealand

Geomorphological maps are a fundamental tool to represent landforms and understand how different morphological elements and agents shaped a natural landscape. They are also important as background information for many fields of research including ecology, forestry and of course, glaciology. In this week’s blog, Levan Tielidze tells us about the importance of mapping glacial geomorphology, presenting a new map from New Zealand. This is a joint post, published together with the cryospheric sciences division blog and the geomorphology division blog, …


Do meditation and a better science correlate? – Mindfulness in Academia

Do meditation and a better science correlate? – Mindfulness in Academia

We often start searching for the term “mental health” online only when mental issues are already arising. It seems to be a trendy word on everyone’s social media. Of course, you don’t have to suffer already in order to learn about, and benefit from, mindfulness – or the ability to notice the present moment and what is going on in your life. In this post, I am sharing how I became a more mindful scientist, and why I am convinced …


Climate Change and Cryosphere – What can we learn from the smallest, most vulnerable glaciers in the Ötztal Alps?

Climate Change and Cryosphere – What can we learn from the smallest, most vulnerable glaciers in the Ötztal Alps?

The Alps were the first mountains to be studied from a glaciological point of view in the 19th century and they host some of the most studied glaciers of Earth. Some of them are found in the Central Alps and in particular, the Ötztal Alps. Just to cite the most known and largest glaciers in this Alpine sector, we can mention Hintereisferner or Vernagtferner. But in the Ötztal Alps you can also find many small glaciers which, as it often …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

With the start of the virtual EGU General Assembly 2021 less than three weeks away, the March newsletter is filled with the information you need to register, create an accessible (and effective) vPICO presentation, and understand the vEGU21 time-block schedule. You can also take a first look around the new conference platform, which promises a much more complete experience than EGU was able to offer last year.

The Loupe also highlights practical information applicable to vEGU21 and beyond, including how to get the most out of online conferences; how to balance the schedule and your commitments with caring responsibilities; and how to take advantage of display uploads and commenting to continue interacting with colleagues beyond the meeting’s two week-duration.

In addition to the latest Journal Watch and GeoRoundup of this month’s EGU journal highlights, this issue also looks at two current policy-related topics: the pressure that democracy is under from the influence of social media, and how you can achieve policy impact.

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