EGU logo

European Geosciences Union

Division on Cryospheric Sciences
cr.egu.eu

Division on Cryospheric Sciences

President: Olaf Eisen (cr@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Carleen Tijm-Reijmer (c.h.tijm-reijmer@uu.nl)

The Cryosphere are those parts of the Earth and other planetary bodies that are subject to prolonged periods of temperatures below the freezing point of water. These include glaciers, frozen ground, sea ice, snow and ice. One of the main aims of the EGU Division on Cryospheric Sciences is to facilitate the exchange of information within the science community. It does so by organizing series of sessions at the annual EGU assembly, and through the publishing of the open-access journal `The Cryosphere’. The division awards the Louis Agassiz medal for outstanding contributions to the science of the cryosphere.

Recent awardees

Andreas Kääb

Andreas Kääb

  • 2019
  • Louis Agassiz Medal

The 2019 Louis Agassiz Medal is awarded to Andreas Kääb for innovative and multidisciplinary contributions to the field of remote sensing of the cryosphere, with applications in glacier mass balance, permafrost and geohazards.


Frank Pattyn

Frank Pattyn

  • 2018
  • Louis Agassiz Medal

The 2018 Louis Agassiz Medal is awarded to Frank Pattyn for his unsurpassed contributions to the understanding of large-scale ice-sheet dynamics and his leadership in the internationally coordinated efforts to improve ice-sheet models.


Fanny Brun

Fanny Brun

  • 2018
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2018 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Fanny Brun Can ice cliffs explain the “debris-cover anomaly”? New insights from Changri Nup Glacier, Nepal


Sandra Vázquez-Martín

Sandra Vázquez-Martín

  • 2018
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2018 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Sandra Vázquez-Martín Ground-based in-situ snowfall speed measurements: Microphysical properties of snowflakes

Latest posts from the CR blog

Image of the Week - When "Ice, Ice Baby" puts rocks "Under Pressure"

Image of the Week - When "Ice, Ice Baby" puts rocks "Under Pressure"

Bowie and Queen said it first, and Vanilla Ice brought it back. But now, I’ve set out to quantify it: Pressure. Rocks in glacial landscapes can experience many different kinds of pressure (forces), from sources like regional tectonics or even the weight of the glacier itself. Our hypothesis is that smaller-scale pressures, caused by the formation of ice in small bedrock cracks (frost-weathering), have a large effect on the sculpting of landscapes in cold regions. This post will share how …


Image of the Week - Seven weeks in Antarctica [and how to study its surface mass balance]

Image of the Week - Seven weeks in Antarctica [and how to study its surface mass balance]

After only two months of PhD at the Laboratoire de Glaciologie of the Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB, Belgium), I had the chance to participate in an ice core drilling campaign in the Princess Ragnhild coastal region, East Antarctica, during seven weeks in December 2018 – January 2019 for the Mass2Ant project. Our goal was to collect ice cores to better evaluate the evolution of the surface mass balance in the Antarctic Ice sheet. Despite the sometimes-uncomfortable weather conditions, the …


Image of the Week – We walked the Talk to Everest

Image of the Week – We walked the Talk to Everest

The 12 day “Walk the Talk” Field Conference and Community Consultation through Sagarmatha National Park, Nepal, discussed a wide range of research outputs with local communities, tourists, and officials. Topics covered glaciers, mountains, environmental and landscape change, Sherpa livelihoods, tourism, and natural hazards. The conference, organised by Himalayan Research Expeditions, was the first of its kind, designed to receive community input into research topics and pursue applied benefits. Scott and Katie were two of the participants, presenting work from their …


Image of the Week - Delaying the flood with glacial geoengineering

Image of the Week - Delaying the flood with glacial geoengineering

As the climate is currently warming, many countries and cities are preparing to cope with one of its major impacts, namely sea-level rise. Up to now, the mitigation of climate change has mainly focused on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Large-scale geoengineering has also been proposed to remove carbon from the atmosphere or inject aerosols into the stratosphere to limit the rise in temperature. But locally-targeted geoengineering techniques could also provide a way to avoid some of the worst …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

We are thrilled to announce we received over 17,000 abstracts to the EGU General Assembly 2019! We look forward to welcoming all participants in Vienna on 7–12 April. Aside from many exciting scientific sessions and events, the meeting will have more time for presentations and networking, an illustrator and sculptor as artists in residence, and much more.

We would also like to remind you that until 31 January, you can apply for the General Assembly Mentoring Programme, either as a mentor, if you are an experienced General Assembly attendee, or as a mentee, if you are a first-timer at the meeting.

Until 15 February, you can enter the Imaggeo Photo Contest for a chance to win a free registration to next year’s General Assembly. You can also apply to receive an EGU Public Engagement Grant until 15 February, if you have a geoscience outreach project you’d like to develop. Winners receive 1000 EUR and a free registration to next year's General Assembly.

Last but not the least, if you'd like to organise an EGU Galileo Conference, a meeting addressing a well-focused, cutting-edge topic at the frontier of geosciences research, make sure to apply for funding by 28 February. The first EGU Galileo Conference of 2019 will be on ‘Mass extinctions, recovery and resilience’ and is now accepting abstracts.

Find CR on

Subscribe to

Tweets by @egu_cr