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Bluesy glacier (Credit: Velio Coviello, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

CR Cryospheric Sciences Division on Cryospheric Sciences

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Cryospheric Sciences
cr.egu.eu

Division on Cryospheric Sciences

President: Carleen Tijm-Reijmer (cr@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Nanna B. Karlsson (nbk@geus.dk)

The Cryosphere are those parts of the Earth and other planetary bodies that are subject to prolonged periods of temperatures below the freezing point of water. These include glaciers, frozen ground, sea ice, snow and ice. One of the main aims of the EGU Division on Cryospheric Sciences is to facilitate the exchange of information within the science community. It does so by organizing series of sessions at the annual EGU assembly, and through the publishing of the open-access journal `The Cryosphere’. The division awards the Julia and Johannes Weertman medal for outstanding contributions to the science of the cryosphere.


 

Recent awardees

Martyn Tranter

Martyn Tranter

  • 2021
  • Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal

The 2021 Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal is awarded to Martyn Tranter for his outstanding fundamental contributions in the innovative and emerging field of glacial biogeochemistry, leading to the paradigm shift in recognizing bio-albedo effects.


Christine L. Batchelor

Christine L. Batchelor

  • 2021
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2021 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Christine L. Batchelor for her contributions to cryospheric sciences by her studies on glacial history and palaeo-ice sheet reconstructions.


Julienne C. Stroeve

Julienne C. Stroeve

  • 2020
  • Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal

The 2020 Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal is awarded to Julienne C. Stroeve for her fundamental contributions to improved satellite observations of sea ice, better understanding of causes of sea ice variability and change, and her compelling communication to the wider public.


Anna E. Hogg

Anna E. Hogg

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Anna E. Hogg for outstanding research in the field of satellite remote sensing of the cryosphere and her contributions to science communications.

Latest posts from the CR blog

Image of the week – The hidden ice of mountainous regions

When speaking about glaciers and the ice they contain, we generally picture large, clean, and therefore relatively white mountain glaciers… But did you know about rock glaciers? From our Image of the Week, you might notice that they do not quite look like the classic ice glacier you might have had in mind. Indeed, they actually indicate the presence of mountain permafrost, an often poorly understood and rarely mentioned feature of the cryo-world. So, what exactly are these rock glaciers? …


Questions from space: what is snow and what is ice on the Greenland ice sheet?

We usually think of a glacier as a white, clean surface. Well, this is only an idealized vision because in reality glaciers are far from immaculate, they can be colored! And this is extremely important since colored (dirty) ice absorbs more solar radiation than clean ice, accelerating melt. One of the places on Earth where it is fundamental to understand these processes is Greenland, where ice is getting darker and melting at an increasing rate. Here I want to show …


The softness of ice, how we measure it, and why it matters for sea level rise

One of the first things school children learn is that ice is a solid, and forms by freezing water. Most people think of ice as brittle–have you ever dropped a slippery ice cube on the kitchen floor, and watch it break and shatter into many pieces? It may be surprising, then, to find that ice can also stretch and squeeze, like a ball of pizza dough! Once deformed, ice is then softer in certain directions than others. When we think …


The Norwegian Polar Institute

It is a pleasure for the EGU Cryoblog team to present a new post category: Cryo-institutes around the world! There are many institutes working on cryosphere-related research spread around the world. The aim of this new category is to highlight the cool research that is carried out at these institutes, showing off our multi-faceted cryo-related science. In this opening post, Ashley Morris will present the first institute: the Norwegian Polar Institute, and for good reason! Norway is one of the …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

The June issue of The Loupe is all about Oceans! With both World Oceans Day and the International Day of the Seafarer falling in June, we thought what better month to focus on the work of EGU researcher studying the Oceans. We spoke with Ocean Science Division Early Career Scientist Rep Meriel Bittner on how to get involved in the Division and learned about the reality of research onboard a research vessel for LGBTQIA+ people from guest blogger Huw Griffiths.

The Loupe also shares some vital information for scientists concerned about their work being misrepresented by policymakers, either accidentally or on purpose, from EGU’s Policy Officer Chloe Hill for the GeoPolicy blog, and features a call for new members to be nominated to the Equality Diversity and Inclusion Working Group.

In addition to the latest Journal Watch and GeoRoundup of June EGU journal highlights, this issue also highlights the opening of the call for EGU22 scientific session submissions, the deadline for which is 6 September 2021.

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