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Division on Cryospheric Sciences
cr.egu.eu

Division on Cryospheric Sciences

President: Olaf Eisen (cr@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Carleen Tijm-Reijmer (c.h.tijm-reijmer@uu.nl)

The Cryosphere are those parts of the Earth and other planetary bodies that are subject to prolonged periods of temperatures below the freezing point of water. These include glaciers, frozen ground, sea ice, snow and ice. One of the main aims of the EGU Division on Cryospheric Sciences is to facilitate the exchange of information within the science community. It does so by organizing series of sessions at the annual EGU assembly, and through the publishing of the open-access journal `The Cryosphere’. The division awards the Louis Agassiz medal for outstanding contributions to the science of the cryosphere.

Recent awardees

Andreas Kääb

Andreas Kääb

  • 2019
  • Louis Agassiz Medal

The 2019 Louis Agassiz Medal is awarded to Andreas Kääb for innovative and multidisciplinary contributions to the field of remote sensing of the cryosphere, with applications in glacier mass balance, permafrost and geohazards.


Frank Pattyn

Frank Pattyn

  • 2018
  • Louis Agassiz Medal

The 2018 Louis Agassiz Medal is awarded to Frank Pattyn for his unsurpassed contributions to the understanding of large-scale ice-sheet dynamics and his leadership in the internationally coordinated efforts to improve ice-sheet models.


Fanny Brun

Fanny Brun

  • 2018
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2018 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Fanny Brun Can ice cliffs explain the “debris-cover anomaly”? New insights from Changri Nup Glacier, Nepal


Sandra Vázquez-Martín

Sandra Vázquez-Martín

  • 2018
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2018 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Sandra Vázquez-Martín Ground-based in-situ snowfall speed measurements: Microphysical properties of snowflakes

Latest posts from the CR blog

Did you know? – Storms can make Arctic sea ice disappear even faster

Did you know? – Storms can make Arctic sea ice disappear even faster

The increase in air and water temperature due to climate change drives the retreat in the Arctic sea-ice cover. During summer, when sunlight reaches the Arctic, the absorption of heat by the dark ocean water enhances the sea-ice melt through the ice-albedo feedback. During winter, when sunlight does not reach the Arctic, another feedback is at work, as storms enhance the energy transfer between air, ice and water… How can storms enhance sea-ice melting? In summer, when the Arctic sea-ice …


An interview with… Marie Dumont

An interview with… Marie Dumont

This week, we are interviewing Dr Marie Dumont. At the European Geosciences Union (EGU) general assembly in 2019, Marie was awarded the Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientist. Marie is currently a research team leader and deputy scientific director for the Snow Research Centre (part of Centre National de Recherches Meteorologiques, Météo-France & Le Centre national de la Recherche Scientifique [CNRS]) in France. Here, we ask her questions to find out a little more about the snow scientist. …


Surviving in cold environments: from microbes under glaciers to queer scientists in the current social context

Surviving in cold environments: from microbes under glaciers to queer scientists in the current social context

On the 5th of July we will celebrate the International Day of LGBTQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transsexual, queer, and people that do not identify themselves as cis and/or straight) People in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Maths (STEM). Many people will ask: “Why is this day important?” Being a queer scientist in particular, and a queer person in general, can sometimes reminds us of how living organisms feel in extreme environments. In this blog post, I will use the analogy of …


Image of the Week – Looking to the past for answers

Image of the Week – Looking to the past for answers

We’re only just really starting to comprehend the state and fate of Himalayan glaciers due to a scarcity of research along the monumental mountain range. Climbers and scientists have been observing these lofty glaciers since the 1900s. However, is that looking back far enough? Glacier moraines, featuring in this Image of the Week, can reveal change extending back thousands of years. You may look at Figure 1 and think ‘what is that?! It’s a mess!’ and you would be right …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

June marked an important chapter in the EGU history. The Union has launched a new vision and strategy for the next five years and announced a move of the EGU Executive Office to new premises. We have also announced two job vacancies at the office, for a Head of Media, Communications & Outreach and for a Chief Strategy & Finance Officer. The deadline for applications is 14 July.

We have also opened a call for financial support to organise EGU training schools and conferences this month. Finally, we opened the EGU General Assembly 2020 call for sessions. You can submit your sessions ideas by 15 August (Union Symposia and Great Debates) or 5 September (other session types).

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