Bluesy glacier (Credit: Velio Coviello, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

CR Cryospheric Sciences Division on Cryospheric Sciences

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Cryospheric Sciences
cr.egu.eu

Division on Cryospheric Sciences

President: Carleen Tijm-Reijmer (cr@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Nanna B. Karlsson (nbk@geus.dk)

The Cryosphere are those parts of the Earth and other planetary bodies that are subject to prolonged periods of temperatures below the freezing point of water. These include glaciers, frozen ground, sea ice, snow and ice. One of the main aims of the EGU Division on Cryospheric Sciences is to facilitate the exchange of information within the science community. It does so by organizing series of sessions at the annual EGU assembly, and through the publishing of the open-access journal `The Cryosphere’. The division awards the Julia and Johannes Weertman medal for outstanding contributions to the science of the cryosphere.


 

Recent awardees

Martyn Tranter

Martyn Tranter

  • 2021
  • Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal

The 2021 Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal is awarded to Martyn Tranter for his outstanding fundamental contributions in the innovative and emerging field of glacial biogeochemistry, leading to the paradigm shift in recognizing bio-albedo effects.


Christine L. Batchelor

Christine L. Batchelor

  • 2021
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2021 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Christine L. Batchelor for her contributions to cryospheric sciences by her studies on glacial history and palaeo-ice sheet reconstructions.


Julienne C. Stroeve

Julienne C. Stroeve

  • 2020
  • Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal

The 2020 Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal is awarded to Julienne C. Stroeve for her fundamental contributions to improved satellite observations of sea ice, better understanding of causes of sea ice variability and change, and her compelling communication to the wider public.


Anna E. Hogg

Anna E. Hogg

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Anna E. Hogg for outstanding research in the field of satellite remote sensing of the cryosphere and her contributions to science communications.

Latest posts from the CR blog

The Norwegian Polar Institute

The Norwegian Polar Institute

It is a pleasure for the EGU Cryoblog team to present a new post category: Cryo-institutes around the world! There are many institutes working on cryosphere-related research spread around the world. The aim of this new category is to highlight the cool research that is carried out at these institutes, showing off our multi-faceted cryo-related science. In this opening post, Ashley Morris will present the first institute: the Norwegian Polar Institute, and for good reason! Norway is one of the …


Cryo Careers: Should I stay, or should I go? Non-linear career paths

Cryo Careers: Should I stay, or should I go? Non-linear career paths

Nature is chaotic and random. Non-linear processes take place in our oceans, atmosphere and ice. No two snowflakes are the same, so why would two careers be the same? In this week’s blog, we highlight a number of scientists who took non-linear routes in their careers and give you some advice if you are considering a career change. Why do we need to highlight different career paths? From a young age, we are asked ‘what do you want to be …


Life on the (Ice) Edge: Antarctic Seabirds and Sea Ice

Life on the (Ice) Edge: Antarctic Seabirds and Sea Ice

The vast expanse of Antarctic sea-ice may appear inhospitable at first, but the region supports one of the most productive ecosystems on Earth. Amongst the organisms that call Antarctica home, certain seabird species have become so well adapted to the harsh conditions that they not only survive in the region, but flourish. Like all Antarctic organisms, seabirds are intricately linked to the continent’s sea ice, dependant on it for survival. With a warming climate, sea ice conditions are changing, with …


Image of the Week – Did you know that Arctic sea ice is melting from the bottom?

Image of the Week – Did you know that Arctic sea ice is melting from the bottom?

The current retreat of Arctic sea ice is a major sign of ongoing climate changes. And it could almost disappear during summer in a few decades from now, depending on the amount of greenhouse gases we will emit into the atmosphere. In this context, understanding what are the exact causes of this sea-ice loss is important. One of these causes is the amount of heat transported by the ocean (which depends on both the temperature and the velocity of ocean …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

In May’s issue of the Loupe we are recognising the incredible efforts of our members and volunteers in bringing vEGU21 to fruition and looking ahead to the upcoming year, with new volunteer members of the Early Career Scientist teams, and the fast approaching deadline for the Award and Medal nominations. This issue features two EGU divisions: Geodynamics (GD) and Earth Magnetism and Rock Physics (EMRP).

The Loupe also shares a report by 2021 Science Policy pairing scheme scientist Renée Bichler about her experiences doing a virtual Science Policy pairing scheme placement with MEP Maria Spyraki, and hears from the Earth Magnetism and Rock Physics Division Early Career Scientist Saioa Arquero about her Division’s plans for the future.

In addition to the latest Journal Watch and GeoRoundup of May EGU journal highlights, this issue also highlights the Science Policy events calendar to help you find your next opportunity to build your science policy network.

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