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Bluesy glacier (Credit: Velio Coviello, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

CR Cryospheric Sciences Division on Cryospheric Sciences

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Cryospheric Sciences
cr.egu.eu

Division on Cryospheric Sciences

President: Carleen Tijm-Reijmer (cr@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Nanna B. Karlsson (nbk@geus.dk)

The Cryosphere are those parts of the Earth and other planetary bodies that are subject to prolonged periods of temperatures below the freezing point of water. These include glaciers, frozen ground, sea ice, snow and ice. One of the main aims of the EGU Division on Cryospheric Sciences is to facilitate the exchange of information within the science community. It does so by organizing series of sessions at the annual EGU assembly, and through the publishing of the open-access journal `The Cryosphere’. The division awards the Julia and Johannes Weertman medal for outstanding contributions to the science of the cryosphere.


 

Recent awardees

Regine Hock

Regine Hock

  • 2022
  • Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal

The 2022 Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal is awarded to Regine Hock for outstanding scientific achievements on the study of glacier mass balance and immense service to the global cryospheric community.


Romain Millan

Romain Millan

  • 2022
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2022 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Romain Millan for contributions to cryospheric sciences through the development of new methods to map ocean and subglacial topography, and methods to quantify dynamic changes in flowing ice.


Martyn Tranter

Martyn Tranter

  • 2021
  • Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal

The 2021 Julia and Johannes Weertman Medal is awarded to Martyn Tranter for his outstanding fundamental contributions in the innovative and emerging field of glacial biogeochemistry, leading to the paradigm shift in recognizing bio-albedo effects.


Christine L. Batchelor

Christine L. Batchelor

  • 2021
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2021 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Christine L. Batchelor for her contributions to cryospheric sciences by her studies on glacial history and palaeo-ice sheet reconstructions.


Calvin Beck

Calvin Beck

  • 2021
  • Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award

The 2021 Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award is awarded to Calvin Beck Assessing the time-step dependency of calculating supraglacial debris thermal diffusivity from vertical temperature profiles


Erik Loebel

Erik Loebel

  • 2021
  • Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award

The 2021 Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award is awarded to Erik Loebel Automated extraction of calving front locations from multi-spectral satellite imagery using deep learning: methodology and application to Greenland outlet glaciers


Linda Thielke

Linda Thielke

  • 2021
  • Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award

The 2021 Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award is awarded to Linda Thielke Thermal sea ice classification during the MOSAiC expedition

Latest posts from the CR blog

What cryoscientists should expect for a Covid-regulated EGU22

After two (long) years of remote work and virtual conferencing, we are looking forward to engaging with fellow scientists in-person at the upcoming EGU22 General Assembly! But, with Covid-19 still in the air, this year’s conference will be held as a hybrid format. In this way, EGU22 will be modified to comply with Austrian pandemic restrictions, as well as introduce new elements to the programme to engage with those attending remotely. The Cryosphere Division will be active on Twitter during …


Ice-hot news: A cryo-summary of the new IPCC assessment report!

We have waited eight years for it, and it is finally out: the 6th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (a.k.a. « IPCC AR6 »)! And it is more than 10,000 pages long across Working Groups! Fortunately, a synthesis report integrating the findings of all three working groups should be released in Autumn 2022. However, we, at the EGU Cryosphere Blog, thought it might be useful to highlight the main cryo-findings! A brief history of the IPCC …


Taiwan’s Icy Past

The beautiful island of Taiwan (as given by its colonial name, Ilha Formosa) is primarily known for its lush tropical forests, delicious culinary cuisine, bubbling hot springs, and a bustling cityscape. But, what does Taiwan have to do with the cryosphere? Before you resist the urge to leave and get a bubble tea, read on to find out about Taiwan’s cryospheric past! From cities to mountains Taiwan is one of the most densely populated areas in the world, with a …


Current challenges: high-altitude Chilean glacier monitoring in an extended drought

Central Chile has been facing a long dry period since 2010, marked by a high mean precipitation deficit, a so-called Mega Drought (MD) (Garreaud et al., 2019). This, besides long-term temperature increase (Burger et al., 2018; Falvey & Garreaud, 2009), has affected negatively the glaciers’ mass balance in the region mainly due to low snow accumulation throughout a hydrological year (which is from April to March). Glaciers under pressure The Olivares River basin (33º9’S – 70º11’W, 543 km²), a sub-basin …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

In the April issue of The Loupe, Earth day is in the spotlight amidst the looming climate change crisis. Find out how EGU and fourteen other geoscience organisations around the world have committed to create a just and sustainable future for the planet. As EGU’s Early Career Scientist (ECS) Representative, Anita Di Chiara explains how ECS can get more involved in EGU and the scientific community.

A few weeks to go for EGU22, which takes place from 23-27 May 2022! Registration for on-site participation has now closed, however you can still register to join us virtually till 27 May 2022.

This issue also highlights some of the key science for policy sessions at EGU22, and includes the latest Journal Watch and GeoRoundup of April EGU journal highlights.

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