EMRP Earth Magnetism & Rock Physics Division on Earth Magnetism & Rock Physics

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Earth Magnetism & Rock Physics
emrp.egu.eu

Division on Earth Magnetism & Rock Physics

President: Fabio Florindo (emrp@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Eric Font (font_eric@hotmail.com)
Deputy President: Sergio Vinciguerra (sergiocarmelo.vinciguerra@unito.it)

The Earth is a dynamical planet: its interiors’ electro-magnetism and physical properties contribute to this exciting property of our planet. The Earth Magnetism & Rock Physics (EMRP) Division addresses the experimental, theoretical and modeling approaches of fundamental solid-Earth and magneto-hydrodynamic processes that extend from the Earth’s surface to the core. A continuous demand for a better understanding of the magneto-hydrodynamic and physical processes responsible for the Earth’s magnetic field spatial and temporal variability is required. Theoretical and experimental aspects of rock physics, environmental magnetism, magnetic anomalies and plate tectonic reconstructions, magnetic polarity reversals, petrophysical assessment throughout physical, mechanical and magnetic properties, electrical conductivity and transport properties of the Earth’s crust and mantle are some of the key topics of research of our ‘living planet’ to which this division is dedicated.

The division awards the Louis Néel and the Petrus Peregrinus medals for outstanding contributions to geomagnetism, palaeomagnetism and rock physics.

In line with EGU and the other divisions, EMRP is actively trying to engage with early career scientists (ECS). The ECS representative of EMRP division is working with the other divisions ECS representatives to improve visibility of ECS concerns, as well as, help out with any ECS related issues (e.g. first attendance at EGU General Assembly and how to organize sessions).

Check out the ECS section for more information (http://www.egu.eu/ecs/) or contact directly the ECS representative of EMRP division (see at http://www.egu.eu/emrp/structure/).

Recent awardees

Rixiang Zhu

Rixiang Zhu

  • 2020
  • Petrus Peregrinus Medal

The 2020 Petrus Peregrinus Medal is awarded to Rixiang Zhu for his outstanding accomplishments in magnetism and paleomagnetism and his extraordinary support of the scientific community.


Wenlu Zhu

Wenlu Zhu

  • 2020
  • Louis Néel Medal

The 2020 Louis Néel Medal is awarded to Wenlu Zhu for her exceptional contributions to understanding coupling between fluids and rock deformation and in recognition of her role in promoting women in science and rock physics globally.


Catherine Kissel

Catherine Kissel

  • 2019
  • Petrus Peregrinus Medal

The 2019 Petrus Peregrinus Medal is awarded to Catherine Kissel for outstanding contributions in palaeomagnetism, applied to understanding the Earth’s magnetic field, palaeoclimate, palaeoceanography and the geodynamic evolution of the Mediterranean margins.


Chris Marone

Chris Marone

  • 2019
  • Louis Néel Medal

The 2019 Louis Néel Medal is awarded to Chris Marone for seminal contributions to the understanding of fault mechanics and earthquake generating processes, and for innovation in experimental techniques and apparatus development.


Leonie Pick

Leonie Pick

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Leonie Pick Historical geomagnetic storm drivers determined exclusively from ground-based magnetometer measurements

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Thursday 30 July marks the centennial of the birth of Marie Tharp, a pioneering geologist and cartographer whose groundbreaking scientific contributions played a key role in the eventual acceptance of the theory of plate tectonics. Tharp is best known for her detailed seafloor maps that revealed a wealth of previously unknown features, including seamounts, trenches, transform faults, and most notably, the mid-ocean ridge system.

Tharp’s story is all the more compelling due to the adversity she overcame during her career—much of it related to her gender. Because Tharp didn’t always receive credit for her work, her contributions were initially overlooked. Fortunately, Hali Felt, the author of Tharp’s biography, and others have helped correct the record. “Marie wouldn’t have chosen to experience the gender discrimination that told her the humanities were a “better fit” and forced her to work in an office rather than the field,” says Felt in a recent EGU blog, “but the result was that she found her calling closer to home, and mapped 70 percent of the Earth’s surface in the process.”

This month, EGU is celebrating Tharp’s achievements, and those of all women geoscientists, through a series of posts, including one by the Tectonics and Structural Geology Division that revisits her legacy and its importance for laying the foundations of modern geology. EGU also spoke with six researchers working in the fields of ocean science, tectonics, and mapping to ask them what Marie Tharp’s work means to them personally, as well as to the future of ocean science and tectonic research. “Her life story is a burning, guiding light for me,” says marine geographer Dawn Wright.

We hope these articles will inspire all EGU members to help one another overcome whatever adversity we face. Tharp “succeeded in building a career that she loved, and was proud of,” says structural geologist Lucia Perez Diaz. “As a woman in science, I can’t imagine a better dream to work towards.”

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