G Geodesy Division on Geodesy

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Geodesy
g.egu.eu

Division on Geodesy

President: Johannes Böhm (g@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Annette Eicker (annette.eicker@hcu-hamburg.de)

Traditionally geodesy is the science of the measurement and the mapping of the Earth’s surface. Since the surface is mainly shaped by the Earth’s gravity field the classical definition includes the Earth’s gravitational potential. Observing the Earth figure, the orientation and rotation as well as the gravity field, geodesy today provides spatial and temporal patterns of geophysical processes within the Earth system such as sea level rise, tides, melting of continental ice masses, changes in global water circulation and in the atmosphere or deformations of the solid Earth. Consequently, the geodesy division covers activities on the whole spectrum of modern geodetic Earth system modeling from the measurement systems to the investigation of geophysical processes.

Recent awardees

Willi Freeden

Willi Freeden

  • 2020
  • Vening Meinesz Medal

The 2020 Vening Meinesz Medal is awarded to Willi Freeden for his pioneering work in combining a comprehensive mathematical theory with fundamental geodetic problems and advanced applications in Earth system sciences and global change studies.


Karina Wilgan

Karina Wilgan

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Karina Wilgan for the development of new methods for the integration of GNSS delays, meteorological observations and numerical weather prediction models for applications in InSAR and GNSS.


Tonie van Dam

Tonie van Dam

  • 2019
  • Vening Meinesz Medal

The 2019 Vening Meinesz Medal is awarded to Tonie van Dam for pioneering work on the deformations of the solid Earth under a variety of surface loads and on their measurements using space geodetic observation techniques.


Benedikt Soja

Benedikt Soja

  • 2019
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2019 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Benedikt Soja for original research and contributions to the fields of very long baseline interferometry and terrestrial reference frames.


Christina Lück

Christina Lück

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Christina Lück Using Swarm to derive global sea level budgets


Philipp Zingerle

Philipp Zingerle

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Philipp Zingerle High-resolution combined global gravity field modeling: Towards a combined d/o 10800 model

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Thursday 30 July marks the centennial of the birth of Marie Tharp, a pioneering geologist and cartographer whose groundbreaking scientific contributions played a key role in the eventual acceptance of the theory of plate tectonics. Tharp is best known for her detailed seafloor maps that revealed a wealth of previously unknown features, including seamounts, trenches, transform faults, and most notably, the mid-ocean ridge system.

Tharp’s story is all the more compelling due to the adversity she overcame during her career—much of it related to her gender. Because Tharp didn’t always receive credit for her work, her contributions were initially overlooked. Fortunately, Hali Felt, the author of Tharp’s biography, and others have helped correct the record. “Marie wouldn’t have chosen to experience the gender discrimination that told her the humanities were a “better fit” and forced her to work in an office rather than the field,” says Felt in a recent EGU blog, “but the result was that she found her calling closer to home, and mapped 70 percent of the Earth’s surface in the process.”

This month, EGU is celebrating Tharp’s achievements, and those of all women geoscientists, through a series of posts, including one by the Tectonics and Structural Geology Division that revisits her legacy and its importance for laying the foundations of modern geology. EGU also spoke with six researchers working in the fields of ocean science, tectonics, and mapping to ask them what Marie Tharp’s work means to them personally, as well as to the future of ocean science and tectonic research. “Her life story is a burning, guiding light for me,” says marine geographer Dawn Wright.

We hope these articles will inspire all EGU members to help one another overcome whatever adversity we face. Tharp “succeeded in building a career that she loved, and was proud of,” says structural geologist Lucia Perez Diaz. “As a woman in science, I can’t imagine a better dream to work towards.”

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