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European Geosciences Union

Division on Seismology
sm.egu.eu

Division on Seismology

President: Paul Martin Mai (sm@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Philippe Jousset (pjousset@gfz-potsdam.de)

About the Seismology Division

The EGU offers an open and widely recognized forum for discussing a wide range of scientific questions and conducting corresponding research. The impact of geosciences to society has probably never been as high as today. Therefore, we pursue broad and open-minded approaches to tackle important research topics, while simultaneously engaging in interdisciplinary collaborations for the benefit of humanity and our planet.

Seismology as a discipline contributes to a large variety of both basic and applied scientific fields, and addresses important topics in the context of both natural resources and natural hazards. The seismology (SM) division at EGU aims to strengthen its inter-disciplinarity and impact by driving the development from static to dynamic geophysical models, by conducting research that spans from acquisition parameters to petrophysical properties, and by supporting the transition from geo-modeling to geo-technical application. Thereby, the SM Division will be increasingly able to make relevant forecasts and provide valuable information to tackle future challenges in securing natural resources and quantifying natural hazards.

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Latest News

Short Course at EGU General Assembly 2017

Please take note of the following Short Course, organized by the ECS-Team of the Seismology Division

Title: SC76/SM10.11 -- Seismology for non-seismologists

Time: to be announced

Location: to be announced

Description:

This short course is dedicated to non-seismologists, with a particular focus for young scientists (graduates, PhD students and postdocs). The main goal of this short course is to provide an introduction into the basic concepts and methods in seismology and how these methods are applicable to investigate the near-surface and Earth’s interior. The course will highlight the role that advanced seismological analysis techniques can play in the co-interpretation of results from other fields in the geosciences, such as tectonics, physics, geology, geodynamics, volcanology and hydrology.

The topics covered this year will include
(1) what and how seismologists measure in land and at sea.
(2) how seismologists study earthquake sources and how these studies relate to seismic hazard.
(3) how seismologists image the interior of the Earth with and without earthquakes.

We likely won’t turn you into a seismologist in 90 minutes, but would rather like to make you aware how seismological techniques can help you in geoscience. The intention is to discuss each topic in a non-technical manner, emphasizing their respective strengths and potential shortcomings. Not only will this course help non-seismologists to better understand seismic results but it will also facilitate more enriched discussion between different scientific disciplines.

The 90-minute short course will be run by fellow young seismologists and geoscientists, who will present examples from their own research and from reference papers for illustration. 15-20 minutes will be reserved for questions from the audience on the topics covered by the short course and general seismology.

 

Consider this: Take your career one step further

Early Career Scientist representatives for the Seismology Division

Why not take your career one step further? The Seismology Division within the European Geosciences Union is looking for a representative of young seismologists. Making awesome science is very important, but the scientific community does not only need good scientists but also community representatives and leaders. Get first hand experience of what it involves to be part of a large organization. Get the opportunity to meet great established scientists and make new friends who can be future colleagues.

Whether you are a PhD student or a Post Doc, being an Early Career Scientist (ECS) representative does not mean it will interfere with your work. To the contrary, it is a great opportunity to expand your horizons, interact with a large network of researchers in your field, build on your communications skills, boost your CV and influence the activities of Europe¹s largest geoscientific association.

The role can take on a variety of tasks, according to their areas of expertise and interest. These can include (but aren¹t limited to):organizing events for early career scientists at the annual General Assembly, outreach to early career scientists and the wider public through social media or the division blog, or establishing a mentoring programme for other early career scientists.

Interested? Read more here:

Give it a go! Send an email stating your interest to become the next early career scientists representative for the Seismology Division and/or any questions you might have to sm-ecs@egu.eu

Continued Interest

Recent awardees

Haruo Sato

Haruo Sato

  • 2018
  • Beno Gutenberg Medal

The 2018 Beno Gutenberg Medal is awarded to Haruo Sato for outstanding contributions to seismology and the development of new insights into stochastic properties of Earth structure through theoretical and observational studies of scattered seismic waves.


Martin van Driel

Martin van Driel

  • 2018
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award

The 2018 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award is awarded to Martin van Driel for exceptional research in modelling and understanding global broadband seismic-wave propagation.


Hitoshi Kawakatsu

Hitoshi Kawakatsu

  • 2017
  • Beno Gutenberg Medal

The 2017 Beno Gutenberg Medal is awarded to Hitoshi Kawakatsu for outstanding contributions to seismological studies of deep earthquakes, volcanoes, subduction zones, and the Earth’s mantle.


Elmer Ruigrok

Elmer Ruigrok

  • 2017
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award

The 2017 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award is awarded to Elmer Ruigrok for pioneering contributions to the methodology of retrieving seismic-reflection responses from passive seismic data, including ambient noise, and to its application at global, regional and basin scale.


Baptiste Gombert

Baptiste Gombert

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Baptiste Gombert A Bayesian analysis of the 2016 Mw=7.8 Pedernales (Ecuador) earthquake


Nienke Blom

Nienke Blom

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Nienke Blom Imaging density in the Earth and the construction of optimal observables

Latest posts from the SM blog

The new ECS-reps team of the Seismology Division!

The new ECS-reps team of the Seismology Division!

At the EGU General Assembly 2018, a new team of Seismology Early Career Scientist representatives was introduced and installed. With more than half of the EGU membership consisting of Early Career Scientists, the team represent an important part of the community and want to be approachable for all. They will be responsible for the Seismology blog, organize the yearly short course “Seismology for non-seismologists” at the General Assembly, and organize outreach and career events. Next to that, they plan to …


Some Seismology reminders for EGU2018 General Assembly

Some Seismology reminders for EGU2018 General Assembly

With only 2 days left for the kick off of the annual European Geosciences Union General Assembly (2018), here is a quick-list to go through in time for EGU. First, read this page for information concerning activities for Early Career Scientists at the GA: https://www.egu.eu/young-scientists/at-the-assembly/ EGU2018 mobile app The EGU2018 mobile app is now available. Go to http://app.egu2018.eu to download the app. Short Courses With an ever increasing number of short courses held at the GA, probably there is one …


Seismology for non-seismologists

Seismology for non-seismologists

Short Course at EGU2018, organized by the ECS-Team of the Seismology Division Title: SC1.23 – Seismology for Non-Seismologists Time: Monday 9 April, 13:30 – 15:00 Location: Room -2.91 Are you getting ready for the upcoming General Assembly EGU2018? Consider attending our short course in Seismology on Monday. How do seismologists detect earthquakes? How do we locate them? Is seismology only about earthquakes? Seismology has been integrated into a wide variety of geo-disciplines to be complementary to many fields such as …


SeismoChat: How to disarm earthquakes

SeismoChat: How to disarm earthquakes

Solmaz Mohajder is a researcher at the Earth System Dynamics Research group of University of Tübingen in Germany. She has published an online database and an interactive map for active faults in Central Asia (Mohajder et al., 2016). More recently, Solmaz and her colleagues have compiled fault slip rates to investigate whether deformation rates from GPS and from geologic observations provide consistent slip rate information at the orogen scale (Mohadjer et al., 2017). In 2016, Solmaz was awarded an EGU …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

This month the EGU has opened a call for financial support for training schools in the Earth, planetary or space sciences scheduled for 2019. We also welcome proposals for conferences on solar system and planetary processes, as well as on biochemical processes in the Earth system, in line with two new conference series we are launching that are named after two female scientists.

Also this month, we have opened the EGU 2019 General Assembly call for sessions, with 6 September as a deadline for scientific sessions, short courses and townhall meetings. The deadline to submit proposals for Union Symposia and Great Debates is 15 August. Last but not the least, we are pleased to announced we have raised 17,000 EUR for a carbon offsetting scheme, thanks to 2018 General Assembly participants.

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