SM Seismology Division on Seismology

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Seismology
sm.egu.eu

Division on Seismology

President: Philippe Jousset (sm@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Paul Martin Mai (martin.mai@kaust.edu.sa)

About the Seismology Division

The EGU offers an open and widely recognized forum for discussing a wide range of scientific questions and conducting corresponding research. The impact of geosciences to society has probably never been as high as today. Therefore, we pursue broad and open-minded approaches to tackle important research topics, while simultaneously engaging in interdisciplinary collaborations for the benefit of humanity and our planet.

Seismology as a discipline contributes to a large variety of both basic and applied scientific fields, and addresses important topics in the context of both natural resources and natural hazards. The seismology (SM) division at EGU aims to strengthen its inter-disciplinarity and impact by driving the development from static to dynamic geophysical models, by conducting research that spans from acquisition parameters to petrophysical properties, and by supporting the transition from geo-modeling to geo-technical application. Thereby, the SM Division will be increasingly able to make relevant forecasts and provide valuable information to tackle future challenges in securing natural resources and quantifying natural hazards.

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Recent awardees

Weian Chao

Weian Chao

  • 2020
  • Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists

The 2020 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists is awarded to Weian Chao in recognition of his major contributions to using existing seismic networks to improve landslide monitoring, allowing authorities to act quickly to mitigate landslide damage.


Annie Souriau

Annie Souriau

  • 2019
  • Beno Gutenberg Medal

The 2019 Beno Gutenberg Medal is awarded to Annie Souriau in recognition of outstanding contributions to seismological studies of the Earth’s inner and outer cores.


Piero Poli

Piero Poli

  • 2019
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2019 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Piero Poli for innovative research in seismic interferometry and earthquake seismology.


Ángela María Gómez García

Ángela María Gómez García

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Ángela María Gómez García Crustal structure of the Lesser and Leeward Antilles forearcs inferred from satellite Vertical Gravity Gradients


Janneke van Ginkel

Janneke van Ginkel

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Janneke van Ginkel Ambivalent Amplifications – Using horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios to characterise subsurface seismic properties

Latest posts from the SM blog

Seismology Job Portal

Seismology Job Portal

On this page, we regularly update open positions in Seismology for early career scientists. Do you have a job on offer? Contact us at ecs-sm@egu.eu Please, note that other available research positions are displayed on the EGU Jobs Portal. Latest open positions: Investigador titular or asociado position in seismology at Instituto de Geofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México: Assistant and Associate tenure track Professor: Applicants should be motivated, broad-thinking scientists whose research covers seismology and/or geodesy (GNSS or INSAR) who …


Follow up on: “The sound of COVID-Silence”

Follow up on: “The sound of COVID-Silence”

Dear colleagues, In the last months, there has been a storm both in traditional and social media about the observation that the Covid-19 lockdown measures cause an unprecedented seismic urban “silence”, which is observed globally on many urban seismic stations. It is the first time that such a protracted noise reduction has been observed on a global scale at the same time. To gather all seismological analyses that arise from this unique period, we are pleased to announce that the …


Seismology Job Portal

Seismology Job Portal

On this page, we regularly update open positions in Seismology for early career scientists. Do you have a job on offer? Contact us at ecs-sm@egu.eu Please, note that other available research positions are displayed on the EGU Jobs Portal. Latest open positions: Two year PostDoc at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore: A geological approach to quantifying hazard from rising seas and earthquakes. Fully-funded PhD at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore: A geological approach to quantifying hazard from rising seas and earthquakes. PostDoc …


Lockdown in Northern Italy, what did seismology see?

Lockdown in Northern Italy, what did seismology see?

Seismologists are not surprised to see that the coronavirus lockdowns reduce seismic ambient noise; but what is emerging from the data is that the reduction is quite spectacular. This shows that human activities – road and railroad traffic, industrial machinery – account for a significant chunk of background Earth’s vibration: and that is a form of pollution that deserves more attention than it is receiving. In seismically active countries (think Japan, California, Italy) that are equipped with dense seismic networks, …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Thursday 30 July marks the centennial of the birth of Marie Tharp, a pioneering geologist and cartographer whose groundbreaking scientific contributions played a key role in the eventual acceptance of the theory of plate tectonics. Tharp is best known for her detailed seafloor maps that revealed a wealth of previously unknown features, including seamounts, trenches, transform faults, and most notably, the mid-ocean ridge system.

Tharp’s story is all the more compelling due to the adversity she overcame during her career—much of it related to her gender. Because Tharp didn’t always receive credit for her work, her contributions were initially overlooked. Fortunately, Hali Felt, the author of Tharp’s biography, and others have helped correct the record. “Marie wouldn’t have chosen to experience the gender discrimination that told her the humanities were a “better fit” and forced her to work in an office rather than the field,” says Felt in a recent EGU blog, “but the result was that she found her calling closer to home, and mapped 70 percent of the Earth’s surface in the process.”

This month, EGU is celebrating Tharp’s achievements, and those of all women geoscientists, through a series of posts, including one by the Tectonics and Structural Geology Division that revisits her legacy and its importance for laying the foundations of modern geology. EGU also spoke with six researchers working in the fields of ocean science, tectonics, and mapping to ask them what Marie Tharp’s work means to them personally, as well as to the future of ocean science and tectonic research. “Her life story is a burning, guiding light for me,” says marine geographer Dawn Wright.

We hope these articles will inspire all EGU members to help one another overcome whatever adversity we face. Tharp “succeeded in building a career that she loved, and was proud of,” says structural geologist Lucia Perez Diaz. “As a woman in science, I can’t imagine a better dream to work towards.”

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