SM Seismology Division on Seismology

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Seismology
sm.egu.eu

Division on Seismology

President: Philippe Jousset (sm@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Paul Martin Mai (martin.mai@kaust.edu.sa)

About the Seismology Division

The EGU offers an open and widely recognized forum for discussing a wide range of scientific questions and conducting corresponding research. The impact of geosciences to society has probably never been as high as today. Therefore, we pursue broad and open-minded approaches to tackle important research topics, while simultaneously engaging in interdisciplinary collaborations for the benefit of humanity and our planet.

Seismology as a discipline contributes to a large variety of both basic and applied scientific fields, and addresses important topics in the context of both natural resources and natural hazards. The seismology (SM) division at EGU aims to strengthen its inter-disciplinarity and impact by driving the development from static to dynamic geophysical models, by conducting research that spans from acquisition parameters to petrophysical properties, and by supporting the transition from geo-modeling to geo-technical application. Thereby, the SM Division will be increasingly able to make relevant forecasts and provide valuable information to tackle future challenges in securing natural resources and quantifying natural hazards.

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Latest News

Short Course at EGU General Assembly 2017

Please take note of the following Short Course, organized by the ECS-Team of the Seismology Division

Title: SC76/SM10.11 -- Seismology for non-seismologists

Time: to be announced

Location: to be announced

Description:

This short course is dedicated to non-seismologists, with a particular focus for young scientists (graduates, PhD students and postdocs). The main goal of this short course is to provide an introduction into the basic concepts and methods in seismology and how these methods are applicable to investigate the near-surface and Earth’s interior. The course will highlight the role that advanced seismological analysis techniques can play in the co-interpretation of results from other fields in the geosciences, such as tectonics, physics, geology, geodynamics, volcanology and hydrology.

The topics covered this year will include
(1) what and how seismologists measure in land and at sea.
(2) how seismologists study earthquake sources and how these studies relate to seismic hazard.
(3) how seismologists image the interior of the Earth with and without earthquakes.

We likely won’t turn you into a seismologist in 90 minutes, but would rather like to make you aware how seismological techniques can help you in geoscience. The intention is to discuss each topic in a non-technical manner, emphasizing their respective strengths and potential shortcomings. Not only will this course help non-seismologists to better understand seismic results but it will also facilitate more enriched discussion between different scientific disciplines.

The 90-minute short course will be run by fellow young seismologists and geoscientists, who will present examples from their own research and from reference papers for illustration. 15-20 minutes will be reserved for questions from the audience on the topics covered by the short course and general seismology.

 

Consider this: Take your career one step further

Early Career Scientist representatives for the Seismology Division

Why not take your career one step further? The Seismology Division within the European Geosciences Union is looking for a representative of young seismologists. Making awesome science is very important, but the scientific community does not only need good scientists but also community representatives and leaders. Get first hand experience of what it involves to be part of a large organization. Get the opportunity to meet great established scientists and make new friends who can be future colleagues.

Whether you are a PhD student or a Post Doc, being an Early Career Scientist (ECS) representative does not mean it will interfere with your work. To the contrary, it is a great opportunity to expand your horizons, interact with a large network of researchers in your field, build on your communications skills, boost your CV and influence the activities of Europe¹s largest geoscientific association.

The role can take on a variety of tasks, according to their areas of expertise and interest. These can include (but aren¹t limited to):organizing events for early career scientists at the annual General Assembly, outreach to early career scientists and the wider public through social media or the division blog, or establishing a mentoring programme for other early career scientists.

Interested? Read more here:

Give it a go! Send an email stating your interest to become the next early career scientists representative for the Seismology Division and/or any questions you might have to sm-ecs@egu.eu

Continued Interest

Recent awardees

Weian Chao

Weian Chao

  • 2020
  • Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists

The 2020 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists is awarded to Weian Chao in recognition of his major contributions to using existing seismic networks to improve landslide monitoring, allowing authorities to act quickly to mitigate landslide damage.


Annie Souriau

Annie Souriau

  • 2019
  • Beno Gutenberg Medal

The 2019 Beno Gutenberg Medal is awarded to Annie Souriau in recognition of outstanding contributions to seismological studies of the Earth’s inner and outer cores.


Piero Poli

Piero Poli

  • 2019
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2019 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Piero Poli for innovative research in seismic interferometry and earthquake seismology.


Ángela María Gómez García

Ángela María Gómez García

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Ángela María Gómez García Crustal structure of the Lesser and Leeward Antilles forearcs inferred from satellite Vertical Gravity Gradients


Janneke van Ginkel

Janneke van Ginkel

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Janneke van Ginkel Ambivalent Amplifications – Using horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios to characterise subsurface seismic properties

Latest posts from the SM blog

Seismology Job Portal

Seismology Job Portal

On this page, we regularly update open positions in Seismology for early career scientists. Do you have a job on offer? Contact us at ecs-sm@egu.eu Please, note that other available research positions are displayed on the EGU Jobs Portal. Latest open positions: Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Edimburgh: https://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/BYD112/postdoctoral-research-associate-in-passive-seismology-for-site-characterisation-and-seismic-hazard-evaluation PhD Fellowship at Victoria University of Wellington: We seek two highly motivated students for two separate 3-year PhD scholarships supported through the Resilience to Nature’s Challenges National Science Challenge …


Ambient seismic noise and the quest for groundwater

Ambient seismic noise and the quest for groundwater

Groundwater is water stored within permeable geological formations, and nearly a third of Earth’s freshwater supply comes from this source (a). In Africa, the overwhelming majority of distributable freshwater is contained in groundwater, and in the EU, 75% of the population relies on groundwater (b). This dependence on groundwater is steadily rising. As humanity as a whole, figures out how to adapt to the impacts of climate change and population growth on water stress, scientists have projected a 20 – …


Early Career Scientist representative? You might be the next one!

Early Career Scientist representative? You might be the next one!

Why Early Career Scientist (ECS) representatives? The EGU SM division tackles cutting-edge research topics covering a large variety of basic and applied scientific fields in the context of both natural resources and natural hazards. The EGU SM division is a space where one can discuss a wide range of scientific questions and their societal impact. To engage in a forward-looking discussion and strengthen the collaborations within its community, early career scientists are essential. The role of these representatives is to …


Imaging volcanic perturbations induced by large earthquakes

Imaging volcanic perturbations induced by large earthquakes

In a study recently published in Nature Communications [1], an international team led by researchers from the Institut de physique du globe de Paris (IPGP) has sought to better understand how the 2011 Tohoku-Oki mega-earthquake in Japan disrupted volcanic regions, by monitoring the seismic anisotropy in these regions before and after the earthquake. What is seismic anisotropy? A seismic wave propagates in terrestrial rocks at a speed depending on the properties of these rocks. However, within the same rock, the …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

We are looking forward to welcoming all participants to the 2020 EGU General Assembly on 3–8 May in Vienna. In addition to many exciting scientific sessions, the meeting will feature hundreds of short courses and networking events plus a packed exhibition hall!

The 2020 General Assembly will also continue a number of traditions, including the popular Imaggeo Photo Contest. You have until 15 February 2020 to enter your photos and videos for a chance to win fame and fortune – in the form of a free registration to next year’s General Assembly. Another tradition is the annual mentoring programme, which supports first-time conference attendees and helps them assemble their own professional networks. The programme, which only lasts for the duration of the General Assembly, depends on both mentors and mentees signing up; brief applications are due by 8 March 2020.

In case you missed them: here are the winners of the EGU's Best Blog Posts and the Best of Imaggeo 2019 competitions as well as the year’s Top 10 most-read blog posts. (The most read? Think Game of Thrones.)

Do you have a geoscience outreach project you’d like to develop? The call for funding is open until 15 February 2020 for EGU Public Engagement Grants. Winners receive 1500 EUR and one free registration to next year’s General Assembly.

If you’d like to organise a meeting addressing a focused, cutting-edge topic at the frontiers of geoscience research, you have until 29 February 2020 to propose an EGU Galileo Conference.

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