SM Seismology Division on Seismology

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Seismology
sm.egu.eu

Division on Seismology

President: Philippe Jousset (sm@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Paul Martin Mai (martin.mai@kaust.edu.sa)

About the Seismology Division

The EGU offers an open and widely recognized forum for discussing a wide range of scientific questions and conducting corresponding research. The impact of geosciences to society has probably never been as high as today. Therefore, we pursue broad and open-minded approaches to tackle important research topics, while simultaneously engaging in interdisciplinary collaborations for the benefit of humanity and our planet.

Seismology as a discipline contributes to a large variety of both basic and applied scientific fields, and addresses important topics in the context of both natural resources and natural hazards. The seismology (SM) division at EGU aims to strengthen its inter-disciplinarity and impact by driving the development from static to dynamic geophysical models, by conducting research that spans from acquisition parameters to petrophysical properties, and by supporting the transition from geo-modeling to geo-technical application. Thereby, the SM Division will be increasingly able to make relevant forecasts and provide valuable information to tackle future challenges in securing natural resources and quantifying natural hazards.

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Latest News

Short Course at EGU General Assembly 2017

Please take note of the following Short Course, organized by the ECS-Team of the Seismology Division

Title: SC76/SM10.11 -- Seismology for non-seismologists

Time: to be announced

Location: to be announced

Description:

This short course is dedicated to non-seismologists, with a particular focus for young scientists (graduates, PhD students and postdocs). The main goal of this short course is to provide an introduction into the basic concepts and methods in seismology and how these methods are applicable to investigate the near-surface and Earth’s interior. The course will highlight the role that advanced seismological analysis techniques can play in the co-interpretation of results from other fields in the geosciences, such as tectonics, physics, geology, geodynamics, volcanology and hydrology.

The topics covered this year will include
(1) what and how seismologists measure in land and at sea.
(2) how seismologists study earthquake sources and how these studies relate to seismic hazard.
(3) how seismologists image the interior of the Earth with and without earthquakes.

We likely won’t turn you into a seismologist in 90 minutes, but would rather like to make you aware how seismological techniques can help you in geoscience. The intention is to discuss each topic in a non-technical manner, emphasizing their respective strengths and potential shortcomings. Not only will this course help non-seismologists to better understand seismic results but it will also facilitate more enriched discussion between different scientific disciplines.

The 90-minute short course will be run by fellow young seismologists and geoscientists, who will present examples from their own research and from reference papers for illustration. 15-20 minutes will be reserved for questions from the audience on the topics covered by the short course and general seismology.

 

Consider this: Take your career one step further

Early Career Scientist representatives for the Seismology Division

Why not take your career one step further? The Seismology Division within the European Geosciences Union is looking for a representative of young seismologists. Making awesome science is very important, but the scientific community does not only need good scientists but also community representatives and leaders. Get first hand experience of what it involves to be part of a large organization. Get the opportunity to meet great established scientists and make new friends who can be future colleagues.

Whether you are a PhD student or a Post Doc, being an Early Career Scientist (ECS) representative does not mean it will interfere with your work. To the contrary, it is a great opportunity to expand your horizons, interact with a large network of researchers in your field, build on your communications skills, boost your CV and influence the activities of Europe¹s largest geoscientific association.

The role can take on a variety of tasks, according to their areas of expertise and interest. These can include (but aren¹t limited to):organizing events for early career scientists at the annual General Assembly, outreach to early career scientists and the wider public through social media or the division blog, or establishing a mentoring programme for other early career scientists.

Interested? Read more here:

Give it a go! Send an email stating your interest to become the next early career scientists representative for the Seismology Division and/or any questions you might have to sm-ecs@egu.eu

Continued Interest

Recent awardees

Weian Chao

Weian Chao

  • 2020
  • Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists

The 2020 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists is awarded to Weian Chao in recognition of his major contributions to using existing seismic networks to improve landslide monitoring, allowing authorities to act quickly to mitigate landslide damage.


Annie Souriau

Annie Souriau

  • 2019
  • Beno Gutenberg Medal

The 2019 Beno Gutenberg Medal is awarded to Annie Souriau in recognition of outstanding contributions to seismological studies of the Earth’s inner and outer cores.


Piero Poli

Piero Poli

  • 2019
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2019 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Piero Poli for innovative research in seismic interferometry and earthquake seismology.


Ángela María Gómez García

Ángela María Gómez García

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Ángela María Gómez García Crustal structure of the Lesser and Leeward Antilles forearcs inferred from satellite Vertical Gravity Gradients


Janneke van Ginkel

Janneke van Ginkel

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Janneke van Ginkel Ambivalent Amplifications – Using horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios to characterise subsurface seismic properties

Latest posts from the SM blog

Creating Value for Safety: from earthquake preparedness to pandemic outbreak response

Creating Value for Safety: from earthquake preparedness to pandemic outbreak response

Disasters happen world-wide, almost every day. If you are an earthquake seismologist (or engineer), chances are good that seismic hazard is in your daily diet. Developing an earthquake scenario, estimating the seismic hazard, assessing the risk, regulating the land use: we usually conduct these tasks to limit the socio-economic impact of a seismic event. However, when planning and coordinating the emergency response, many more facets come into play. Initial indifference, denial, disbelief, then awareness, finally acceptance, and abnegation. A succession …


Representing the Possible – Milena Marjanovic

Representing the Possible – Milena Marjanovic

I remember the first lecture vividly, it was on Plate Tectonics. From that moment, I knew what my profession will be What is your story, Milena? I am a Marine Geophysicist interested in exploring plate boundaries, in particular, mid-ocean ridges using active source seismology. I am a sea-going researcher, which means that every now and then, I tend to spend several weeks (up to a couple of months) at the open ocean collecting seismic data. I have participated in six …


Representing the Possible: Ortensia Amoroso

Representing the Possible: Ortensia Amoroso

Gender inequality blemishes Earth Sciences more than any other STEM fields [1]. In recent years, many studies have revealed that women hold fewer senior faculty positions than men [1, 2], are given lower ratings to identical abstracts submitted with male author names [3], and are less likely to be first authors of peer-reviewed publications [4]. Providing a collective voice to the female experience and creating mentoring opportunities for career advancement could be the keystone to overcome gender inequality in the …


Representing the Possible

Representing the Possible

A successful development of professional identity is key to a thriving career. Yet, the steady underrepresentation of women in many facets of working life may threaten young career‐focused women in their professional identity projection. ‘Seeing is believing’ – a common saying goes. When women see other women fitting into diverse roles in the workplace, they project themselves more easily into those roles, boosting their self-confidence and aspirations. In the development of professional identity, role models are essential. They are a …

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