Skip to main content
Sandstones of Petra (Credit: Pierrick Nicolet, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

SM Seismology Division on Seismology

EGU logo

European Geosciences Union

Division on Seismology
sm.egu.eu

Division on Seismology

President: Philippe Jousset (sm@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Alice-Agnes Gabriel (gabriel@geophysik.uni-muenchen.de)

About the Seismology Division

The EGU offers an open and widely recognized forum for discussing a wide range of scientific questions and conducting corresponding research. The impact of geosciences to society has probably never been as high as today. Therefore, we pursue broad and open-minded approaches to tackle important research topics, while simultaneously engaging in interdisciplinary collaborations for the benefit of humanity and our planet.

Seismology as a discipline contributes to a large variety of both basic and applied scientific fields, and addresses important topics in the context of both natural resources and natural hazards. The seismology (SM) division at EGU aims to strengthen its inter-disciplinarity and impact by driving the development from static to dynamic geophysical models, by conducting research that spans from acquisition parameters to petrophysical properties, and by supporting the transition from geo-modeling to geo-technical application. Thereby, the SM Division will be increasingly able to make relevant forecasts and provide valuable information to tackle future challenges in securing natural resources and quantifying natural hazards.


Get involved!

Follow us on Facebook and our Seismoblog!

Sign up for the (low traffic) seismo-Email list.

Recent awardees

Yehuda Ben-Zion

Yehuda Ben-Zion

  • 2022
  • Beno Gutenberg Medal

The 2022 Beno Gutenberg Medal is awarded to Yehuda Ben-Zion for outstanding contributions to earthquake seismology, particularly the understanding of the dynamics of earthquake rupture and earthquake fault systems.


Caroline M. Eakin

Caroline M. Eakin

  • 2022
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2022 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Caroline M. Eakin for exceptional observational seismologist skills, developing unique seismological insights into the mantle expression of plate tectonics and plate boundary processes.


Malcolm Sambridge

Malcolm Sambridge

  • 2021
  • Beno Gutenberg Medal

The 2021 Beno Gutenberg Medal is awarded to Malcolm Sambridge for his outstanding and creative contributions to the development, implementation, and selfless dissemination of stochastic inverse methods in seismology and the Earth science community at large.


Eva P. S. Eibl

Eva P. S. Eibl

  • 2021
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2021 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Eva P. S. Eibl in recognition of her transformative contributions to our ability to understand, model, and monitor volcano-, geyser- and glacier-related processes using conventional and new seismological tools.


Nikolaos Triantafyllis

Nikolaos Triantafyllis

  • 2021
  • Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award

The 2021 Virtual Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (vOSPP) Award is awarded to Nikolaos Triantafyllis Gisola: Real-Time Moment Tensor computation optimized for multicore and manycore architectures

Latest posts from the SM blog

Global seismoacoustic waves from the Hunga eruption (Tonga)

Jelle Assink, Senior Geophysicist at KNMI, takes us through the details of the various kinds of waves produced by the Hunga eruption in Tonga earlier this year… On January 15, 2022, a powerful volcanic eruption occurred in the Tonga archipelago in the Pacific Ocean when the submarine Hunga volcano exploded around 04:15 (UTC). This explosion marked the climactic end of an eruptive phase that started on 19 December 2021, after several years of quiescence. Never before have atmospheric waves from …


Vibrant ecosystems: Of rumbling elephants and seismic wildlife monitoring

Tarje Nissen-Meyer – Associate Professor of Geophysics at Oxford University, UK – shows how seismic signals of stomping in the savanna can be used to track elephants and other wildlife in Kenya. Our planet is at unrest. From butterfly wings to rock gigs, typhoons and megathrust earthquakes, mechanical wave disturbances permanently penetrate the Earth system across many orders of magnitude. Such material-bound wavefields carry valuable information over great distances and through otherwise (e.g. optically) often impenetrable substances, perhaps more efficiently …


Seismology Division Events for EGU22

Hello fellow seismologists! After two years the Generally Assembly is finally back in Vienna and we are looking forward to reconnecting with the Seismology Division at EGU22. Through this blogpost we would like to bring your attention to the events that are organized by the Seismology Division and ECS Representatives of the Seismology Division during EGU22. Note that all times are CEST, and links to virtual events can be obtained by being registered for the conference and on the Seismology …


“State of the ECS”: It’s that time of year again – EGU 22!

Hello everyone! Matthew here, writing this as I’m on my way to my first in-person conference in over two years. Speaking of first in-person conferences in over two years… EGU 22 is fast approaching, and the excitement is palpable! Your friendly, multi-neighbourhood EGU Seismology Division ECS Reps (bit of a mouthful) have pulled together a few thoughts on their hopes and dreams for this year’s EGU. So whether it’s your first EGU, or you’ve been to more than the number …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

In the June issue of The Loupe, scientists stress the need for public behaviour change, starting today. Researchers warn of halving snow cover days in the Alps due to high emissions, Ocean Scientist Céline Heuzé advocates for education and behaviour change to protect marine health , and Ilias Grampas sheds light on the European Parliament Intergroup (EP) on ‘Climate Change, Biodiversity and Sustainable Development’.

Also in this issue: A quick science-policy fix made possible through the Global Young Academy’s Science Advice Resource Centre and our free EGUwebinar to help scientists engage with the media and communicate with audiences that may not have the same scientific background.

Find SM on

Subscribe to

Tweets by @EGU_Seismo