SM Seismology Division on Seismology

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Seismology
sm.egu.eu

Division on Seismology

President: Philippe Jousset (sm@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Paul Martin Mai (martin.mai@kaust.edu.sa)

About the Seismology Division

The EGU offers an open and widely recognized forum for discussing a wide range of scientific questions and conducting corresponding research. The impact of geosciences to society has probably never been as high as today. Therefore, we pursue broad and open-minded approaches to tackle important research topics, while simultaneously engaging in interdisciplinary collaborations for the benefit of humanity and our planet.

Seismology as a discipline contributes to a large variety of both basic and applied scientific fields, and addresses important topics in the context of both natural resources and natural hazards. The seismology (SM) division at EGU aims to strengthen its inter-disciplinarity and impact by driving the development from static to dynamic geophysical models, by conducting research that spans from acquisition parameters to petrophysical properties, and by supporting the transition from geo-modeling to geo-technical application. Thereby, the SM Division will be increasingly able to make relevant forecasts and provide valuable information to tackle future challenges in securing natural resources and quantifying natural hazards.

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Latest News

Short Course at EGU General Assembly 2017

Please take note of the following Short Course, organized by the ECS-Team of the Seismology Division

Title: SC76/SM10.11 -- Seismology for non-seismologists

Time: to be announced

Location: to be announced

Description:

This short course is dedicated to non-seismologists, with a particular focus for young scientists (graduates, PhD students and postdocs). The main goal of this short course is to provide an introduction into the basic concepts and methods in seismology and how these methods are applicable to investigate the near-surface and Earth’s interior. The course will highlight the role that advanced seismological analysis techniques can play in the co-interpretation of results from other fields in the geosciences, such as tectonics, physics, geology, geodynamics, volcanology and hydrology.

The topics covered this year will include
(1) what and how seismologists measure in land and at sea.
(2) how seismologists study earthquake sources and how these studies relate to seismic hazard.
(3) how seismologists image the interior of the Earth with and without earthquakes.

We likely won’t turn you into a seismologist in 90 minutes, but would rather like to make you aware how seismological techniques can help you in geoscience. The intention is to discuss each topic in a non-technical manner, emphasizing their respective strengths and potential shortcomings. Not only will this course help non-seismologists to better understand seismic results but it will also facilitate more enriched discussion between different scientific disciplines.

The 90-minute short course will be run by fellow young seismologists and geoscientists, who will present examples from their own research and from reference papers for illustration. 15-20 minutes will be reserved for questions from the audience on the topics covered by the short course and general seismology.

 

Consider this: Take your career one step further

Early Career Scientist representatives for the Seismology Division

Why not take your career one step further? The Seismology Division within the European Geosciences Union is looking for a representative of young seismologists. Making awesome science is very important, but the scientific community does not only need good scientists but also community representatives and leaders. Get first hand experience of what it involves to be part of a large organization. Get the opportunity to meet great established scientists and make new friends who can be future colleagues.

Whether you are a PhD student or a Post Doc, being an Early Career Scientist (ECS) representative does not mean it will interfere with your work. To the contrary, it is a great opportunity to expand your horizons, interact with a large network of researchers in your field, build on your communications skills, boost your CV and influence the activities of Europe¹s largest geoscientific association.

The role can take on a variety of tasks, according to their areas of expertise and interest. These can include (but aren¹t limited to):organizing events for early career scientists at the annual General Assembly, outreach to early career scientists and the wider public through social media or the division blog, or establishing a mentoring programme for other early career scientists.

Interested? Read more here:

Give it a go! Send an email stating your interest to become the next early career scientists representative for the Seismology Division and/or any questions you might have to sm-ecs@egu.eu

Continued Interest

Recent awardees

Weian Chao

Weian Chao

  • 2020
  • Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists

The 2020 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists is awarded to Weian Chao in recognition of his major contributions to using existing seismic networks to improve landslide monitoring, allowing authorities to act quickly to mitigate landslide damage.


Annie Souriau

Annie Souriau

  • 2019
  • Beno Gutenberg Medal

The 2019 Beno Gutenberg Medal is awarded to Annie Souriau in recognition of outstanding contributions to seismological studies of the Earth’s inner and outer cores.


Piero Poli

Piero Poli

  • 2019
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2019 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Piero Poli for innovative research in seismic interferometry and earthquake seismology.


Ángela María Gómez García

Ángela María Gómez García

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Ángela María Gómez García Crustal structure of the Lesser and Leeward Antilles forearcs inferred from satellite Vertical Gravity Gradients


Janneke van Ginkel

Janneke van Ginkel

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Janneke van Ginkel Ambivalent Amplifications – Using horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios to characterise subsurface seismic properties

Latest posts from the SM blog

Follow up on: “The sound of COVID-Silence”

Follow up on: “The sound of COVID-Silence”

Dear colleagues, In the last months, there has been a storm both in traditional and social media about the observation that the Covid-19 lockdown measures cause an unprecedented seismic urban “silence”, which is observed globally on many urban seismic stations. It is the first time that such a protracted noise reduction has been observed on a global scale at the same time. To gather all seismological analyses that arise from this unique period, we are pleased to announce that the …


Seismology Job Portal

Seismology Job Portal

On this page, we regularly update open positions in Seismology for early career scientists. Do you have a job on offer? Contact us at ecs-sm@egu.eu Please, note that other available research positions are displayed on the EGU Jobs Portal. Latest open positions: Two year PostDoc at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore: A geological approach to quantifying hazard from rising seas and earthquakes. Fully-funded PhD at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore: A geological approach to quantifying hazard from rising seas and earthquakes. PostDoc …


Lockdown in Northern Italy, what did seismology see?

Lockdown in Northern Italy, what did seismology see?

Seismologists are not surprised to see that the coronavirus lockdowns reduce seismic ambient noise; but what is emerging from the data is that the reduction is quite spectacular. This shows that human activities – road and railroad traffic, industrial machinery – account for a significant chunk of background Earth’s vibration: and that is a form of pollution that deserves more attention than it is receiving. In seismically active countries (think Japan, California, Italy) that are equipped with dense seismic networks, …


Seismology Job Portal

Seismology Job Portal

On this page, we regularly update open positions in Seismology for early career scientists. Do you have a job on offer? Contact us at ecs-sm@egu.eu Please, note that other available research positions are displayed on the EGU Jobs Portal. Latest open positions: Postdoctoral Position at the University of Edinburgh, U.K. : https://www.vacancies.ed.ac.uk/pls/corehrrecruit/erq_jobspec_version_4.jobspec?p_id=052130 PostDoc opportunity, French ANR project EQTIME in collaboration with LMU Munich: https://ds.iris.edu/message-center/thread/6360/ Computational Seismologist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: https://careers-llnl.ttcportals.com/jobs/5256289-computational-seismologist Associate or Senior Editor – Nature Reviews Earth …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

This month EGU issued an important statement condemning racism—and all other forms of discrimination—anywhere in the world and re-asserting our commitment to improving equality of opportunity, diversity and inclusion both within and beyond the geosciences.

A crucial component of anti-racism is sustaining a productive conversation about issues related to equality, diversity and inclusion. In keeping with EGU’s bottom-up structure and philosophy, we welcome diverse voices and opinions and encourage all geoscientists to constructively express their thoughts. In response to recent events, numerous individuals and groups have done so, including:

In celebration of Pride Month, EGU also published an article about risks to safety and other issues that LGBTQIA+ geoscientists face while conducting fieldwork in certain countries.

Since EGU’s founding, the organisation has worked to ensure equitable treatment for everyone in our community. Through our Equality, Diversity and Inclusion working group, we are working towards our stated goals to increase diversity at EGU events and on EGU committees and boards, and we pledge to continue to foster diversity to advance fundamental and applied geoscience research—to the benefit of the Earth and all humanity.

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