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European Geosciences Union

Division on Seismology
sm.egu.eu

Division on Seismology

President: Paul Martin Mai (sm@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Philippe Jousset (pjousset@gfz-potsdam.de)

About the Seismology Division

The EGU offers an open and widely recognized forum for discussing a wide range of scientific questions and conducting corresponding research. The impact of geosciences to society has probably never been as high as today. Therefore, we pursue broad and open-minded approaches to tackle important research topics, while simultaneously engaging in interdisciplinary collaborations for the benefit of humanity and our planet.

Seismology as a discipline contributes to a large variety of both basic and applied scientific fields, and addresses important topics in the context of both natural resources and natural hazards. The seismology (SM) division at EGU aims to strengthen its inter-disciplinarity and impact by driving the development from static to dynamic geophysical models, by conducting research that spans from acquisition parameters to petrophysical properties, and by supporting the transition from geo-modeling to geo-technical application. Thereby, the SM Division will be increasingly able to make relevant forecasts and provide valuable information to tackle future challenges in securing natural resources and quantifying natural hazards.

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Latest News

Short Course at EGU General Assembly 2017

Please take note of the following Short Course, organized by the ECS-Team of the Seismology Division

Title: SC76/SM10.11 -- Seismology for non-seismologists

Time: to be announced

Location: to be announced

Description:

This short course is dedicated to non-seismologists, with a particular focus for young scientists (graduates, PhD students and postdocs). The main goal of this short course is to provide an introduction into the basic concepts and methods in seismology and how these methods are applicable to investigate the near-surface and Earth’s interior. The course will highlight the role that advanced seismological analysis techniques can play in the co-interpretation of results from other fields in the geosciences, such as tectonics, physics, geology, geodynamics, volcanology and hydrology.

The topics covered this year will include
(1) what and how seismologists measure in land and at sea.
(2) how seismologists study earthquake sources and how these studies relate to seismic hazard.
(3) how seismologists image the interior of the Earth with and without earthquakes.

We likely won’t turn you into a seismologist in 90 minutes, but would rather like to make you aware how seismological techniques can help you in geoscience. The intention is to discuss each topic in a non-technical manner, emphasizing their respective strengths and potential shortcomings. Not only will this course help non-seismologists to better understand seismic results but it will also facilitate more enriched discussion between different scientific disciplines.

The 90-minute short course will be run by fellow young seismologists and geoscientists, who will present examples from their own research and from reference papers for illustration. 15-20 minutes will be reserved for questions from the audience on the topics covered by the short course and general seismology.

 

Consider this: Take your career one step further

Early Career Scientist representatives for the Seismology Division

Why not take your career one step further? The Seismology Division within the European Geosciences Union is looking for a representative of young seismologists. Making awesome science is very important, but the scientific community does not only need good scientists but also community representatives and leaders. Get first hand experience of what it involves to be part of a large organization. Get the opportunity to meet great established scientists and make new friends who can be future colleagues.

Whether you are a PhD student or a Post Doc, being an Early Career Scientist (ECS) representative does not mean it will interfere with your work. To the contrary, it is a great opportunity to expand your horizons, interact with a large network of researchers in your field, build on your communications skills, boost your CV and influence the activities of Europe¹s largest geoscientific association.

The role can take on a variety of tasks, according to their areas of expertise and interest. These can include (but aren¹t limited to):organizing events for early career scientists at the annual General Assembly, outreach to early career scientists and the wider public through social media or the division blog, or establishing a mentoring programme for other early career scientists.

Interested? Read more here:

Give it a go! Send an email stating your interest to become the next early career scientists representative for the Seismology Division and/or any questions you might have to sm-ecs@egu.eu

Continued Interest

Recent awardees

Annie Souriau

Annie Souriau

  • 2019
  • Beno Gutenberg Medal

The 2019 None is awarded to Annie Souriau in recognition of outstanding contributions to seismological studies of the Earth’s inner and outer cores.


Piero Poli

Piero Poli

  • 2019
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award

The 2019 None is awarded to Piero Poli for innovative research in seismic interferometry and earthquake seismology.


Haruo Sato

Haruo Sato

  • 2018
  • Beno Gutenberg Medal

The 2018 None is awarded to Haruo Sato for outstanding contributions to seismology and the development of new insights into stochastic properties of Earth structure through theoretical and observational studies of scattered seismic waves.


Martin van Driel

Martin van Driel

  • 2018
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award

The 2018 None is awarded to Martin van Driel for exceptional research in modelling and understanding global broadband seismic-wave propagation.


Josefine Umlauft

Josefine Umlauft

  • 2018
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2018 None is awarded to Josefine Umlauft Towards 3D Noise Source Location using Matched Field Processing


Kurama Okubo

Kurama Okubo

  • 2018
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2018 None is awarded to Kurama Okubo Overall energy budget of earthquake rupture with dynamically generated off-fault crack network

Latest posts from the SM blog

AGU 2018

AGU 2018

The AGU Fall Meeting: that other large geosciences meeting in the world. As every year, thousands of people burned their yearly share of carbon flying across the globe. Just like last year, the meeting was held on the East coast – but instead of balmy New Orleans, we found ourselves in somewhat chilly Washington DC. For those coming from Europe, this meant slightly less travel (as well as a slightly less gruesome jetlag) – for those coming from (East) Asia, …


Looking for 2019 Guest Writers

Looking for 2019 Guest Writers

Do you like writing about Science, have an idea for a new blog post or just want to try your hand at science communication? You’re in the right place. The EGU Seismology Blog welcomes guest contributions from scientists, students and professionals in the Earth, planetary and space sciences for the 2019! If you want to get involved, contact the blog editor – Marina Corradini (corradini@ipgp.fr) If in doubt, you can submit your idea for a post via the Submit a …


When the Earth gets animated

When the Earth gets animated

Animations are a terrific way to engage students and to support public understanding of Earth Sciences. Yet, to make scientific research accessible, visual and fun is not easy. How do animations bring geophysics concepts to life? We asked the expert, Jenda Johnson (IRIS Education and Public Outreach) When it comes to explaining Earth’s processes, animations come to the rescue. Tectonic plates drifting on the asthenosphere, volcanos spewing lava and rubbles from their crater, earthquakes fracturing the crust and propagating till …


Scientific Talks: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Scientific Talks: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

We’ve all been there at some point: being nervous, stuttering, or losing our train of thought because somebody looks so incredibly bored that you are afraid they might actually collapse. Then there’s saying something stupid or just plain wrong, or talking so fast and quietly that nobody understands what your results are. These are certainly my lowest moments giving talks and I’ll save myself the embarrassment of referring to the time and place they happened. Recently, I attended a conference …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

We are thrilled to announce we received over 17,000 abstracts to the EGU General Assembly 2019! We look forward to welcoming all participants in Vienna on 7–12 April. Aside from many exciting scientific sessions and events, the meeting will have more time for presentations and networking, an illustrator and sculptor as artists in residence, and much more.

We would also like to remind you that until 31 January, you can apply for the General Assembly Mentoring Programme, either as a mentor, if you are an experienced General Assembly attendee, or as a mentee, if you are a first-timer at the meeting.

Until 15 February, you can enter the Imaggeo Photo Contest for a chance to win a free registration to next year’s General Assembly. You can also apply to receive an EGU Public Engagement Grant until 15 February, if you have a geoscience outreach project you’d like to develop. Winners receive 1000 EUR and a free registration to next year's General Assembly.

Last but not the least, if you'd like to organise an EGU Galileo Conference, a meeting addressing a well-focused, cutting-edge topic at the frontier of geosciences research, make sure to apply for funding by 28 February. The first EGU Galileo Conference of 2019 will be on ‘Mass extinctions, recovery and resilience’ and is now accepting abstracts.

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