Sandstones of Petra (Credit: Pierrick Nicolet, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

SM Seismology Division on Seismology

EGU logo

European Geosciences Union

Division on Seismology
sm.egu.eu

Division on Seismology

President: Philippe Jousset (sm@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Paul Martin Mai (martin.mai@kaust.edu.sa)

About the Seismology Division

The EGU offers an open and widely recognized forum for discussing a wide range of scientific questions and conducting corresponding research. The impact of geosciences to society has probably never been as high as today. Therefore, we pursue broad and open-minded approaches to tackle important research topics, while simultaneously engaging in interdisciplinary collaborations for the benefit of humanity and our planet.

Seismology as a discipline contributes to a large variety of both basic and applied scientific fields, and addresses important topics in the context of both natural resources and natural hazards. The seismology (SM) division at EGU aims to strengthen its inter-disciplinarity and impact by driving the development from static to dynamic geophysical models, by conducting research that spans from acquisition parameters to petrophysical properties, and by supporting the transition from geo-modeling to geo-technical application. Thereby, the SM Division will be increasingly able to make relevant forecasts and provide valuable information to tackle future challenges in securing natural resources and quantifying natural hazards.


Get involved!

Follow us on Facebook and our Seismoblog!

Sign up for the (low traffic) seismo-Email list.

Recent awardees

Weian Chao

Weian Chao

  • 2020
  • Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists

The 2020 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists is awarded to Weian Chao in recognition of his major contributions to using existing seismic networks to improve landslide monitoring, allowing authorities to act quickly to mitigate landslide damage.

Latest posts from the SM blog

“State of the ECS”: Welcome!

“State of the ECS”: Welcome!

Maria here. Happy new year! Starting this year, the ECS Team would like to try something new. We realised that we are your reps, but probably you have no idea who we are and what we are up to! Therefore, we will be sharing with you recent experiences, things we discovered that might be interesting to you, or just let you know what we are doing for the ECS seismology community recently. So, here we go. I am the editor …


Seismology Job Portal

Seismology Job Portal

On this page, we regularly update open positions in Seismology for early career scientists. Do you have a job on offer? Contact us at ecs-sm@egu.eu Please, note that other available research positions are displayed on the EGU Jobs Portal. Special Thanks to Eric Löberich for researching job postings for the ECS. Latest open positions: PostDoc at Swiss Seismological Service, ETH Zurich: “We are looking for a researcher with an interest in developing and applying sophisticated approaches for rapid earthquake characterization …


Git or Perish: First commit

Git or Perish: First commit

Maria, a member of our ECS team, recently interviewed Dr Eric Daub from The Alan Truing Institute, London, UK. Here the Seismology ECS Team wants to know how we can do code better. Together. This is the first interview with software engineers explaining the importance of good practices in software development. Dr Eric Daub received his PhD from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in computational physics, where he studied numerical models of earthquake rupture and failure of amorphous materials. …


Earthquake of the month: Russia, deep earthquake M 6.4

Earthquake of the month: Russia, deep earthquake M 6.4

November was not highlighted by a large event (> M 7). However, the TOP 3 of the largest earthquakes include a deep focus rupture on November 30th in the Tatar Strait between eastern Russia and Sajalin Island (Figure 1). This earthquake (M 6.4) occurred at a depth of ~600 km according to different seismology agencies. The moment tensor representation shows an oblique mechanism with a dominant normal rupture (USGS1, GEOFON2, EMSC3). The earthquake occurred in a prone region for deep …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Why is research in Antarctica so important? In this issue of The Loupe, EGU asks experts why they think it really matters. We also highlight blogs from each of the month’s featured EGU divisions: Climate: Past, Present & Future, Cryospheric Sciences, and Nonlinear Processes in Geosciences.

This issue also discusses the extensive fee waiver programme for vEGU21. The abstracts submission deadline is 13 January 2021 at 13:00 CET!

Last, but not least: for those scientists who tend to shop late, there’s the Top 5 (last-minute) gifts for geoscientists. From the ultimate sample collection kit to cake (no, really!), EGU has you covered with our last-minute guide. And the #1 gift? You’ll need to read the blog!

Find SM on

Subscribe to

Tweets by @EGU_Seismo