SSP Stratigraphy, Sedimentology and Palaeontology Division on Stratigraphy, Sedimentology and Palaeontology

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Stratigraphy, Sedimentology and Palaeontology
ssp.egu.eu

Division on Stratigraphy, Sedimentology and Palaeontology

President: Marc De Batist (ssp@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Stéphane Bodin (stefbodin@gmail.com)

The Stratigraphy, Sedimentology and Palaeontology Division (SSP) focuses its activities on all aspects of the sedimentary record. About 70 % of the Earth surface is covered by sedimentary deposits, which are eroded and deposited right at the contact between the solid lithosphere and the atmosphere, biosphere and hydrosphere. Sedimentary rocks record the history of our planet since almost 4 billion of years and play a pivotal role for our understanding of the evolution of life. This deep-time archive of Earth history is studied with a wide range of analytical techniques providing ever stunning details on the evolution of our planet. Sedimentary basins host important natural resources like coal, gas, oil, ore deposits and groundwater and therefore a better understanding of the physical, chemical and biological processes controlling the formation and distribution of sediments and sedimentary rocks is of utmost importance for our society.

Recent awardees

Michael J. Benton

Michael J. Benton

  • 2020
  • Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal

The 2020 Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal is awarded to Michael J. Benton in recognition of his outstanding contributions to vertebrate palaeontology, to palaeobiology and to macroevolution across times of extreme environmental change.


Anna Joy Drury

Anna Joy Drury

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Anna Joy Drury for her fundamental contributions to research on Miocene stable isotope stratigraphy, palaeoceanography and climate evolution.


Isabel P. Montañez

Isabel P. Montañez

  • 2019
  • Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal

The 2019 Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal is awarded to Isabel P. Montañez for major contributions to the field of stratigraphy, in particular through the application of sedimentary geochemistry to address palaeoclimate and sequence stratigraphic concepts in deep time.


Christian Zeeden

Christian Zeeden

  • 2019
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2019 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Christian Zeeden for his outstanding research in the field of astrochronology and for his innovative statistical approaches in constructing astronomically tuned robust time scales.


Florian Pohl

Florian Pohl

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Florian Pohl First measurement of a flow mechanism responsible for enhanced erosion in channel-lobe-transition zones


Theresa Nohl

Theresa Nohl

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Theresa Nohl Implications for cyclicity-based stratigraphic dating from the selective compaction and cementation of a halysitid coral from the Silurian of Gotland (Sweden)

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Thursday 30 July marks the centennial of the birth of Marie Tharp, a pioneering geologist and cartographer whose groundbreaking scientific contributions played a key role in the eventual acceptance of the theory of plate tectonics. Tharp is best known for her detailed seafloor maps that revealed a wealth of previously unknown features, including seamounts, trenches, transform faults, and most notably, the mid-ocean ridge system.

Tharp’s story is all the more compelling due to the adversity she overcame during her career—much of it related to her gender. Because Tharp didn’t always receive credit for her work, her contributions were initially overlooked. Fortunately, Hali Felt, the author of Tharp’s biography, and others have helped correct the record. “Marie wouldn’t have chosen to experience the gender discrimination that told her the humanities were a “better fit” and forced her to work in an office rather than the field,” says Felt in a recent EGU blog, “but the result was that she found her calling closer to home, and mapped 70 percent of the Earth’s surface in the process.”

This month, EGU is celebrating Tharp’s achievements, and those of all women geoscientists, through a series of posts, including one by the Tectonics and Structural Geology Division that revisits her legacy and its importance for laying the foundations of modern geology. EGU also spoke with six researchers working in the fields of ocean science, tectonics, and mapping to ask them what Marie Tharp’s work means to them personally, as well as to the future of ocean science and tectonic research. “Her life story is a burning, guiding light for me,” says marine geographer Dawn Wright.

We hope these articles will inspire all EGU members to help one another overcome whatever adversity we face. Tharp “succeeded in building a career that she loved, and was proud of,” says structural geologist Lucia Perez Diaz. “As a woman in science, I can’t imagine a better dream to work towards.”

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