Sky high (Credit: Taro Nakai, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

ST Solar-Terrestrial Sciences Division on Solar-Terrestrial Sciences

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Solar-Terrestrial Sciences
st.egu.eu

Division on Solar-Terrestrial Sciences

President: Olga Malandraki (st@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Margit Haberreiter (margit.haberreiter@pmodwrc.ch)

The ST Division considers all aspects of solar and heliospheric physics, specifically the solar-terrestrial connection. It covers the physical processes occurring on the Sun, in the solar wind, as well as in Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere. Solar activity (e.g. coronal mass ejections, solar flares, solar energetic particle events) and the response of the near-Earth space environment to these solar phenomena are studied on a wide-range of temporal and spatial scales. Data analysis and interpretation of space-borne and ground-based data, as well as theoretical studies and different modeling techniques are used to better our understanding of how our local star defines the neighborhood that we live in.

Recent awardees

Qiugang Zong

Qiugang Zong

  • 2020
  • Hannes Alfvén Medal

The 2020 Hannes Alfvén Medal is awarded to Qiugang Zong for his outstanding contributions to the identification of the particle acceleration mechanisms in the magnetosphere and to the development of space plasma physics instrumentation.


Lauri Holappa

Lauri Holappa

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Lauri Holappa for outstanding research in the field of space climate and space weather.


Daniel N. Baker

Daniel N. Baker

  • 2019
  • Hannes Alfvén Medal

The 2019 Hannes Alfvén Medal is awarded to Daniel N. Baker for outstanding, multi-faceted contributions to the near-Earth space plasma environment research and predictions, Earth’s radiation belt environment monitoring, and planetary space plasma studies.


Masatoshi Yamauchi

Masatoshi Yamauchi

  • 2019
  • Julius Bartels Medal

The 2019 Julius Bartels Medal is awarded to Masatoshi Yamauchi for extraordinary work in space physics and planetary science.


Chao Xiong

Chao Xiong

  • 2019
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2019 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Chao Xiong for outstanding research on space weather effects on the thermosphere and ionosphere.


Alexander Lukin

Alexander Lukin

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Alexander Lukin Night-side magnetopause: simultaneous observations of ARTEMIS and MMS

Latest posts from the ST blog

Filmmakers get creative with the sounds of satellite data

One of the major motivations behind research into solar-terrestrial physics is the potential consequences of space weather on our technologically dependent society. Given this risk, recognised by many governments around the world, it is a little concerning that a sizable fraction of the public have never even heard of the term “space weather” – for example a recent public dialogue in the UK showed 48% of the adult population reported this. It is therefore important that we reach out to …


New auroral dunes discovered through citizen science

The region of the Earth’s atmosphere lying at altitudes between about 80 and 120 km, corresponding to the mesosphere–lower thermosphere–ionosphere (MLTI), is often referred to as the “ignorosphere”, because its observation is so challenging that only a handful of measurements of its composition, temperature and other physical parameters have been obtained over the last few decades. It is, however, a crucial region in terms of couplings between the upper atmosphere and the magnetosphere. Indeed, when charged particles precipitate from near-Earth …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

As part of EGU’s Mineral Month, the September 2020 newsletter commemorates Friedrich Mohs, a German geologist who invented the Mohs Hardness Scale, thereby changing the way people study minerals to this very day. This issue also announces the upcoming EGU-European Parliament Intergroup virtual science-policy event, which will bring together geoscientists, policymakers, and industry representatives on 30 September to discuss how Earth, planetary, and space science researchers can support the European Green Deal.

Other upcoming events include the next EGU webinar on European Research Council grants, to be held on 19 October, and the annual EGU plenary meeting, which will be held virtually on 22 October.

The Loupe also features the latest EGU blogs, science policy news, and a call for new members of the Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Working Group. Be sure to apply by 21 October!

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