PS Planetary and Solar System Sciences Division on Planetary and Solar System Sciences

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Planetary and Solar System Sciences
ps.egu.eu

Division on Planetary and Solar System Sciences

President: Stephanie C. Werner (ps@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Özgür Karatekin (ozgur.karatekin@oma.be)

The aim of the Planetary & Solar System Sciences Division of the EGU is the promotion of all fields of planetary sciences, ground-based and space mission exploration of the solar system and beyond,  and related models. PS covers papers on both fundamental and applied topics regarding the exploration of the Solar System. The Division, devoted to Science applications in Space, hosts interdisciplinary contributions on the origins and the evolution of the Solar System and the exoplanetary Systems, as well as ideas for future exploration while largely contributing to outreach and educational activities for all audiences.

Recent awardees

Agustín Sánchez-Lavega

Agustín Sánchez-Lavega

  • 2020
  • David Bates Medal

The 2020 David Bates Medal is awarded to Agustín Sánchez-Lavega for his exceptional contributions to solar system exploration and planetary atmospheric dynamics, as well as promoting young researchers, advancing interactions with amateur astronomers, and publicising planetary science.


Beatriz Sánchez-Cano

Beatriz Sánchez-Cano

  • 2020
  • Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists

The 2020 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists is awarded to Beatriz Sánchez-Cano for her outstanding research on the complex variability of Mars’ ionosphere through multi-instrument and multi-mission data processing, analysis and interpretation, as well as numerical modelling.


Tim Van Hoolst

Tim Van Hoolst

  • 2019
  • Runcorn-Florensky Medal

The 2019 Runcorn-Florensky Medal is awarded to Tim Van Hoolst for seminal contributions to the geodesy and geophysics of the terrestrial planets and satellites and for leadership in planetary geodesy.


John Carter

John Carter

  • 2019
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2019 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to John Carter for his discoveries in Martian surface composition, outstanding research on hydrated minerals with implications for Martian climate, and key developments on the analysis of orbital spectral data.


Anna Mittelholz

Anna Mittelholz

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Anna Mittelholz First results from the InSight FluxGate Magnetometer: Constraints on Mars’ crustal magnetic field at the landing site

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Thursday 30 July marks the centennial of the birth of Marie Tharp, a pioneering geologist and cartographer whose groundbreaking scientific contributions played a key role in the eventual acceptance of the theory of plate tectonics. Tharp is best known for her detailed seafloor maps that revealed a wealth of previously unknown features, including seamounts, trenches, transform faults, and most notably, the mid-ocean ridge system.

Tharp’s story is all the more compelling due to the adversity she overcame during her career—much of it related to her gender. Because Tharp didn’t always receive credit for her work, her contributions were initially overlooked. Fortunately, Hali Felt, the author of Tharp’s biography, and others have helped correct the record. “Marie wouldn’t have chosen to experience the gender discrimination that told her the humanities were a “better fit” and forced her to work in an office rather than the field,” says Felt in a recent EGU blog, “but the result was that she found her calling closer to home, and mapped 70 percent of the Earth’s surface in the process.”

This month, EGU is celebrating Tharp’s achievements, and those of all women geoscientists, through a series of posts, including one by the Tectonics and Structural Geology Division that revisits her legacy and its importance for laying the foundations of modern geology. EGU also spoke with six researchers working in the fields of ocean science, tectonics, and mapping to ask them what Marie Tharp’s work means to them personally, as well as to the future of ocean science and tectonic research. “Her life story is a burning, guiding light for me,” says marine geographer Dawn Wright.

We hope these articles will inspire all EGU members to help one another overcome whatever adversity we face. Tharp “succeeded in building a career that she loved, and was proud of,” says structural geologist Lucia Perez Diaz. “As a woman in science, I can’t imagine a better dream to work towards.”

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