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HESS article most cited source on Wikipedia

  • EGU news
  • 9 May 2018

A paper published in the EGU/Copernicus journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences back in 2007 on global climate zones has been named the most cited source on Wikipedia, referenced more than 2.8 million times.




Solid Earth cover

Solid Earth website relaunched

  • EGU news
  • 16 April 2018

The website of the EGU/Copernicus open-access journal Solid Earth was relaunched with a new design during the EGU General Assembly last week. In addition, the former chief executive editor Fabrizio Storti stepped down. His successor is CharLotte Krawczyk who has been an executive editor since 2015.


Highlight articles

Biogeosciences

Reviews and syntheses: Carbonyl sulfide as a multi-scale tracer for carbon and water cycles

Measurements of the trace gas carbonyl sulfide (OCS) are helpful in quantifying photosynthesis at previously unknowable temporal and spatial scales. While CO2 is both consumed and produced within ecosystems, OCS is mostly produced in the oceans or from specific industries, and destroyed in plant leaves in proportion to CO2. This review summarizes the advancements we have made in the understanding of OCS exchange and applications to vital ecosystem water and carbon cycle questions.


Biogeosciences

Field-warmed soil carbon changes imply high 21st-century modeling uncertainty

The temperature sensitivity of soil carbon loss is a critical parameter for projecting future CO2. Isolating soil temperature response in the field is challenging due to difficulties isolating root and microbial respiration. We use a database of direct-warming soil carbon changes to generate a new global temperature sensitivity. Incorporating this into Earth system models reduces projected soil carbon. But it also shows that variation due to this parameter is as high as all other causes.


Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

Estimates of ozone return dates from Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative simulations

We analyse simulations from the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative (CCMI) to estimate the return dates of the stratospheric ozone layer from depletion by anthropogenic chlorine and bromine. The simulations from 20 models project that global column ozone will return to 1980 values in 2047 (uncertainty range 2042–2052). Return dates in other regions vary depending on factors related to climate change and importance of chlorine and bromine. Column ozone in the tropics may continue to decline.


Earth System Dynamics

On the social dynamics of moisture recycling

Moisture recycling is the atmospheric branch of the water cycle, including evaporation and precipitation. While the physical water cycle is well-understood, the social links among the recipients of precipitation back to the sources of evaporation are not. In this work, we develop a method to determine how these social connections unfold, using a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods, finding that there are distinct types of social connections with corresponding policy and management tools.


Latest posts from EGU blogs

Volcanic tourism, in between fascination and hazard awareness. Episode 1: the volcanologist prospective.

Volcanic tourism, in between fascination and hazard awareness. Episode 1: the volcanologist prospective.

Volcanoes are often located in stunning and fascinating places of the world. Some volcanoes are in areas already heavily populated, like Popocatépetl in Mexico or that thanks to tourism become highly or more populated during certain times of the year, like Agung in Indonesia. In addition to the charm, volcanoes can be and have been harmful to both lives and properties. The hazards posed by volcanoes erupting are various and can affect areas both in the vicinity and far away …


When lava meets water...

Pillow-palagonite complex forming as a result of hot lava entering a former river channel or lake in the Columbia River Flood Basalt Province, Washington State, USA (c. 15 My). Individual sediment packages were picked up from the bottom of the water body and trapped within the lava complex (see white arrow). Orange-brown palagonite is a type of clay which forms through the break-down of volcanic glass that surrounds the basaltic pillows.


Imaggeo on Mondays: The breath of our Earth

Imaggeo on Mondays: The breath of our Earth

This picture was taken in the Myvatn geothermal area in southeast Iceland. Seeing the geothermal steam vent in this area while the temperature was -22 degrees Celsius is the best experience in Myvatn. The difference between Iceland’s cold ambient temperature and the released heat from inside the Earth is a really stunning event to see. Iceland is situated in the middle of two tectonic plates (the Eurasian and North American plates) that, through their movement, have led to more than …