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Results of the EGU Extraordinary Spring Election 2019 for SSS Division President announced

  • EGU news
  • 15 April 2019

The EGU election for the role of President of the Soil System Sciences (SSS) Division was open for votes from all 2019 EGU members affiliated with the division from 9 April until 14 April 2019. Claudio Zaccone was elected as SSS Division President for a two-year term (2019–2021) starting today. He may stand for re-election for a further two years at the EGU Autumn Election 2019. Thank you to all EGU members who used their voting right and to the candidates!


Winners of the EGU Public Engagement Grants 2019; Philip Heron (left) and Romana Hödl, Katrin Attermeyer, Laura E. Coulson, Astrid Harjung (right)

EGU Public Engagement Grants 2019 winners announced

  • EGU news
  • 8 April 2019

The EGU Outreach Committee has named Philip Heron as a winner of the EGU Public Engagement Grants 2019 for his project ‘Think like a scientist’. Astrid Harjung and her colleagues Laura Coulson, Romana Hödl and Katrin Attermeyer have also won one of this year’s grants with their project ‘Biogeocaching – a scavenger hunt for the treasures of biology around Lake Lunz’.




Highlight articles

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

Photooxidants from brown carbon and other chromophores in illuminated particle extracts

We measured hydroxyl radical (OH), singlet oxygen (1O2*), and organic triplets (3C*) in illuminated aqueous particle extracts. After measuring the impact of dilution on oxidant concentrations, we extrapolated our results to predict them in ambient particles –1O2* and3C* concentrations appear to be greatly enhanced, whileOH appears largely unchanged. Two of these oxidants (1O2*,3C*) are not yet included in atmospheric models, and our results make it possible to include them in the future.


Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

Northern Hemisphere continental winter warming following the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption: reconciling models and observations

This study provides compelling new evidence that the surface winter warming observed over the Northern Hemisphere continents following the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo was, very likely, completely unrelated to the eruption. This result has implications for earlier eruptions, as the evidence presented here demonstrates that the surface signal of even the very largest known eruptions may be swamped by the internal variability at high latitudes.


Solid Earth

Time-lapse gravity and levelling surveys reveal mass loss and ongoing subsidence in the urban subrosion-prone area of Bad Frankenhausen, Germany

Subrosion, i.e. the underground leaching of soluble rocks, causes disastrous sinkhole events worldwide. We investigate the accompanying mass transfer using quarter-yearly time-lapse gravity campaigns over 4 years in the town of Bad Frankenhausen, Germany. After correcting for seasonal soil water content, we find evidence of underground mass loss and attempt to quantify its amount. This is the first study of its kind to prove the feasibility of this approach in an urban area.


Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

Quantifying variations in shortwave aerosol–cloud–radiation interactions using local meteorology and cloud state constraints

Aerosols are released by natural and human activities. When aerosols encounter clouds they interact in what is known as the indirect effect. Brighter clouds are expected due to the microphysical response; however, certain environments can trigger a modified response. Limits on the stability, humidity, and cloud thickness are applied regionally to investigate local cloud responses to aerosol, resulting in a range of indirect effects that would result in significant cooling or slight warming.


Latest posts from EGU blogs

‘Pompeii’ by Robert Harris – A book review

‘Pompeii’ by Robert Harris – A book review

The GfGD blog theme this month is science communication, and so regular blog contributor Heather Britton reviews a book which she believes contains some useful geological and human experience, in the form of a gripping novel. The Geology for Global Development blog is not a site renowned for book reviews, but when a fiction book embraces geoscience as much as Robert Harris’s ‘Pompeii’ there are few reasons not to write about it on this platform. The book was recommended to …


Image of the Week – The Lost Meteorites of Antarctica…

Image of the Week – The Lost Meteorites of Antarctica…

When most people think of Antarctica, meteorites aren’t the first things that come to mind. Perhaps they imagine the huge ice shelves, the desolate interior, or perhaps penguin colonies near one of the scientific bases — but usually not meteorites. So why is our project looking for meteorites in Antarctica, and besides, aren’t they all lost until they are found? Let’s start with the Antarctic part. Surprisingly, Antarctica is a great place to hunt for meteorites, with two-thirds of all …


Climate change: to mitigate or to adapt? Managing disaster: Cyclone Fani in India, a stronger Atlantic hurricane season. That and more in Jesse Zondervan’s May 2019 #GfGDpicks #SciComm

Climate change: to mitigate or to adapt? Managing disaster: Cyclone Fani in India, a stronger Atlantic hurricane season. That and more in Jesse Zondervan’s May 2019 #GfGDpicks #SciComm

Each month, Jesse Zondervan picks his favourite posts from geoscience and development blogs/news which cover the geology for global development interest. Here’s a round-up of Jesse’s selections for the last month: This month Cyclone Fani hit India with full force. An effective mass evacuation resulting in the loss of no human lives is an impressive disaster management feat. As disaster was averted in India, the Guardian published a briefing on the risk of hurricanes, and whether climate change is to …