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Flags outside the ACV during the EGU 2017 General Assembly

EGU members: provide input on EGU activities

  • EGU news
  • 18 September 2019

The EGU is a member-led organisation, with around 20,000 members from all over the world. We have designed a short survey for EGU members to provide input on what they value from EGU, the results of which will help ensure that we remain responsive to what our members want. If you are an EGU member, we’d ask you to take 5-10 minutes to give feedback on EGU and its activities.



Fracking operations

New study: Fracking prompts global spike in atmospheric methane

  • Press release
  • 14 August 2019

As methane concentrations increase in the Earth’s atmosphere, chemical fingerprints point to a probable source: shale oil and gas, according to new Cornell University research published today in Biogeosciences, a journal of the European Geosciences Union.



Participants of the GIFT workshop at the 2015 General Assembly

Higher education teaching of geoscience: how can the EGU help?

  • EGU news
  • 8 July 2019

EGU’s Committee on Education aims to provide support for higher education, from organising workshops to providing networking opportunities for all those teaching geoscience in higher education. We invite PhD students, postgraduates, research fellows, academic staff and any others teaching geoscience in higher education to fill in a short survey to help us understand the role EGU could play in further supporting higher education.


Highlight articles

Annales Geophysicae

Hybrid-Vlasov modelling of nightside auroral proton precipitation during southward interplanetary magnetic field conditions

When the terrestrial magnetic field is disturbed, particles from the near-Earth space can precipitate into the upper atmosphere. This work presents, for the first time, numerical simulations of proton precipitation in the energy range associated with the production of aurora (∼1–30 keV) using a global kinetic model of the near-Earth space: Vlasiator. We find that nightside proton precipitation can be regulated by the transition region between stretched and dipolar geomagnetic field lines.


Solid Earth

How can geologic decision-making under uncertainty be improved?

In this paper, we outline the key insights from decision-making research about how, when faced with uncertainty, humans constrain decisions through the use of heuristics (rules of thumb), making them vulnerable to systematic and suboptimal decision biases. We also review existing strategies to debias decision-making that have applicability in the geosciences, giving special attention to strategies that make use of information technology and artificial intelligence.


Geoscientific Model Development

Improved methodologies for Earth system modelling of atmospheric soluble iron and observation comparisons using the Mechanism of Intermediate complexity for Modelling Iron (MIMI v1.0)

MIMI v1.0 was designed for use within Earth system models to simulate the 3-D emission, atmospheric processing, and deposition of iron and its soluble fraction. Understanding the iron cycle is important due to its role as an essential micronutrient for ocean phytoplankton; its supply limits primary productivity in many of the world’s oceans. Human activity has perturbed the iron cycle, and MIMI is capable of diagnosing many of these impacts; hence, it is important for future climate studies.


Ocean Science

CO2 effects on diatoms: a synthesis of more than a decade of ocean acidification experiments with natural communities

Diatoms are a group of phytoplankton species responsible for ~ 25% of primary production on Earth. Ocean acidification (OA) could influence diatoms but the key question is if they become more or less important within marine food webs. We synthesize OA experiments with natural communities and found that diatoms are more likely to be positively than negatively affected by high CO2 and larger species may profit in particular. This has important implications for ecosystem services diatoms provide.


Latest posts from EGU blogs

A simple model of convection to study the atmospheric surface layer

A simple model of convection to study the atmospheric surface layer

Since being immortalised in Hollywood film, “the butterfly effect” has become a commonplace concept, despite its obscure origins. Its name derives from an object known as the Lorenz attractor, which has the form of a pair of butterfly wings (Fig. 1). It is a portrait of chaos, the underlying principle hindering long-term weather prediction: just a small change in initial conditions leads to vastly different outcomes in the long run. The three-equation system that gives rise to the Lorenz attractor …


Climate Change & Cryosphere – Summer 2019: The year that the Arctic was sunburned

Climate Change & Cryosphere – Summer 2019: The year that the Arctic was sunburned

June, July and August 2019 saw extensive heat waves across Europe, with air temperatures reaching above 40°C in many countries. In response, record breaking ice melt was observed in Greenland and wildfires in Siberia, Alaska, Arctic Canada and Greenland occurred. A particularly dry and warm summer was responsible for hemisphere-wide changes to the cryosphere. In this week’s post, we will review some of the consequences of this very warm summer of 2019 on our Northern Hemisphere cryosphere. Wildfires Whilst wildfires …


The Sassy Scientist – Earthquake Exoteries Nr. I

The Sassy Scientist – Earthquake Exoteries Nr. I

Every week, The Sassy Scientist answers a question on geodynamics, related topics, academic life, the universe or anything in between with a healthy dose of sarcasm. Do you have a question for The Sassy Scientist? Submit your question here or leave a comment below. In a comment on a post about the key papers in geodynamics, the Curmudgeonly Commenter asked: Could you please point out some exceptionally important papers in geodynamics and tell us something interesting about the history of …