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Submit your images to the EGU Imaggeo Photo Competition

  • EGU news
  • 15 January 2018

The eight annual EGU photo competition opens on 15 January. Up until 15 February (note earlier deadline this year!), every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image on any broad theme related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Simply upload your photos to imaggeo and choose the option to include them in the photo contest.


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Become an EGU member or renew your membership!

  • EGU news
  • 19 December 2017

The EGU is Europe’s premier geosciences union, dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences for the benefit of humanity, worldwide. Membership is open to individuals who subscribe to the objectives of the EGU and who are professionally engaged in or associated with either the geosciences, planetary and space sciences, or related studies. Membership is affordable and provides a number of benefits.


A preview of the responsive design on the new EGU website

New EGU website launched

  • EGU news
  • 18 December 2017

The online home of the European Geosciences Union, egu.eu, has a new and improved look. The new website has a more modern, image-based layout and a fully responsive page design.



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Applications open for the EGU General Assembly Mentoring Programme

  • EGU news
  • 6 November 2017

For the second year in a row, the EGU is offering a mentoring programme for novice conference attendees, students, and early career scientists at its annual General Assembly. The programme aims to facilitate new connections that may lead to long-term professional relationships within the Earth, planetary and space science communities. We especially encourage potential mentors to sign up and share their expertise with first-timers at the General Assembly.


Highlight articles

The Cryosphere

On the similarity and apparent cycles of isotopic variations in East Antarctic snow pits

We explain why snow pits across different sites in East Antarctica show visually similar isotopic variations. We argue that the similarity and the apparent cycles of around 20  cm in the δD and δ18O variations are the result of a seasonal cycle in isotopes, noise, for example from precipitation intermittency, and diffusion. The near constancy of the diffusion length across many ice-coring sites explains why the structure and cycle length is largely independent of the accumulation conditions.


Atmospheric Measurement Techniques

A machine learning calibration model using random forests to improve sensor performance for lower-cost air quality monitoring

Low-cost sensors promise neighborhood-scale air quality monitoring but have been plagued by inconsistent performance for precision, accuracy, and drift. CMU and SenSevere collaborated to develop the RAMP, which uses electrochemical sensors. We present a machine learning algorithm that overcomes previous performance issues and meets US EPA’s data quality recommendations for personal exposure for NO2and tougher “supplemental monitoring” standards for CO&ozone across 19 RAMPs for several months.


Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

Agricultural ammonia emissions in China: reconciling bottom-up and top-down estimates

Substantial differences exist in current estimates of agricultural ammonia emissions in China, hindering understanding of their environmental consequences. This study applies both bottom-up and top-down methods to better quantify agricultural ammonia sources in China using observations from satellite and surface networks interpreted by a chemical transport model. Our estimate of annual Chinese anthropogenic ammonia emission is 11.7 tg (teragram) for 2008 with a strong seasonality peak in summer.


Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

Temporal variability of tidal and gravity waves during a record long 10-day continuous lidar sounding

Gravity waves (GWs) as well as solar tides are a key driving mechanism for the circulation in the Earth’s atmosphere. The temporal variation of these waves is studied using a record long 10-day continuous Rayleigh–Mie–Raman lidar sounding at midlatitudes. This data set shows a large variability of these waves on timescales of a few days and therefore provides new insights into wave intermittency phenomena, which can help to improve model simulations.


Latest posts from EGU blogs

EGU Photo Contest 2018: Now open for submissions!

If you are pre-registered for the 2018 General Assembly (Vienna, 8 – 13 April), you can take part in our annual photo competition! Winners receive a free registration to next year’s General Assembly! The ninth annual EGU photo competition opens on 15 January. Up until 15 February, every participant pre-registered for the General Assembly can submit up three original photos and one moving image on any broad theme related to the Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Shortlisted photos will be …


Rheological Laws: Atoms on the Move

Rheological Laws: Atoms on the Move

The Geodynamics 101 series serves to showcase the diversity of research topics and methods in the geodynamics community in an understandable manner. We welcome all researchers – PhD students to Professors – to introduce their area of expertise in a lighthearted, entertaining manner and touch upon some of the outstanding questions and problems related to their fields. For our first ‘101’ for 2018, we have an entry by postdoctoral researcher Elvira Mulyukova from Yale University about rheology and deformation occurring …


Peat in the Tropics

Peat in the Tropics

As has been previously discussed in Robert’s blog, fertile soil is an incredibly important resource that is fast running out in many regions of the world. It is true that soil’s importance for agriculture (and sustainable development) cannot be understated, but I wish to focus on another aspect of soil in this week’s blog– its ability to store carbon. One soil type in particular, peat, is an incredibly important form of carbon storage. Despite only covering 3% of the Earth’s …