EGU logo

European Geosciences Union

www.egu.eu

EGU

Featured news



EGU-Plain Box square-01.png

EGU Autumn 2018 elections: call for candidates

  • EGU news
  • 17 July 2018

The EGU Election Autumn 2018 for the next EGU Treasurer will take place from 1 to 30 November 2018. You are kindly asked to propose a candidate for the vacancy by 15 September 2018. You are welcome and encouraged to nominate yourself.



GA-logo-square.png

EGU 2019 call for sessions

  • EGU news
  • 25 June 2018

The call for session proposals for the EGU 2019 General Assembly is now open. Until 6 September you can suggest new sessions with conveners and description, or you can propose modifications to current ones. Please note that, similarly to last year, the 6 September deadline also applies to short courses and townhall meetings. The deadline to submit proposals for Union Symposia and Great Debates is 15 August. The next EGU General Assembly is taking place in Vienna, Austria on 7–12 April 2019.


Highlight articles

Biogeosciences

Ideas and perspectives: Strengthening the biogeosciences in environmental research networks

As knowledge in biology and geology explodes, science becomes increasingly specialised. Given the overlap of the environmental sciences, however, the explosion in knowledge inevitably creates opportunities for interconnecting the biogeosciences. Here, 30 scientists emphasise the opportunities for biogeoscience collaborations across the world’s remarkable long-term environmental research networks that can advance science and engage larger scientific and public audiences.


The Cryosphere

Channelized, distributed, and disconnected: subglacial drainage under a valley glacier in the Yukon

We analyse a large glacier borehole pressure dataset and provide a holistic view of the observations, suggesting a consistent picture of the evolution of the subglacial drainage system. Some aspects are consistent with the established understanding and others ones are not. We propose that most of the inconsistencies arise from the capacity of some areas of the bed to become hydraulically isolated. We present an adaptation of an existing drainage model that incorporates this phenomena.


Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

Formation and evolution of tar balls from northwestern US wildfires

This paper presents the first direct atmospheric observations of the formation and evolution of tar balls (TBs) in forest fires collected during the Department of Energy’s Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP). We quantify, for the first time, the TB mass fraction in the BB plumes and show that this mass fraction increases from less than 1 % to 50 % within the first couple of hours of plume aging. Using Mie theory we find that TBs are consistent with being weak light absorbers.


Climate of the Past

Testing the consistency between changes in simulated climate and Alpine glacier length over the past millennium

Glaciers provide iconic illustrations of past climate change, but records of glacier length fluctuations have not been used systematically to test the ability of models to reproduce past changes. One reason is that glacier length depends on several complex factors and so cannot be simply linked to the climate simulated by models. This is done here, and it is shown that the observed glacier length fluctuations are generally well within the range of the simulations.


Latest posts from EGU blogs

SunPy: a Python solar data analysis environment

Introduction For many years now we know that our star the Sun influences the Earth in many different ways, via the total solar irradiance, solar energetic particles and coronal mass ejections. Understanding the influence of the Sun on the Earth requires many different types of measurements. For example, NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) spacecraft, produces over 1 terabyte of data per day (Pesnell et al., 2012), the bulk of it in the form of 4096 by 4096 pixel images in …


Slimy Landscapes

When we think about how our landscapes evolve and change we probably tend to go straight for the big stuff, things like the climate, tectonics or geology, and in my previous blog I looked at how rainfall contributes to changing the planet’s surface. However, it is not just the big stuff which controls these changes, smaller things do as well, for example changes in land cover (ie, from grasses to trees, or the other way round) results in changes in …


An overnight train view of China's Anthropocene - Part 1

An overnight train view of China's Anthropocene - Part 1

The nighttrain from Shanghai to Beijing is a comfortable affair. The train is new and clean. My travel partner and I can charge our phones and relax on soft beds. The railway is almost frictionless, and overall the experience is similar to any ride in the West. But outside, as the vehicle roars through the early night, things become increasingly hazy. As we reach further out from the Shanghai metropolis there is a slow realisation that the urban air-polluted luminous …