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European Geosciences Union

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EGU newsletter

The EGU newsletter is a short email publication sent to EGU members on a monthly basis. It informs the Union membership about EGU events and activities, from highlighting papers published in our open access journals to providing news relating to EGU’s scientific divisions and meetings, including the General Assembly.

EGU members are given the option to subscribe to receive the Union’s email newsletter when buying their EGU membership. Other geoscientists, members of the wider public or the media can subscribe online.

If you are an EGU member subscribed to receive the newsletter (you can check this in your User Area) but have not received the emails, please let us know, and make sure to add media@egu.eu to your address book to prevent spam filters from blocking these emails.

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Thursday 30 July marks the centennial of the birth of Marie Tharp, a pioneering geologist and cartographer whose groundbreaking scientific contributions played a key role in the eventual acceptance of the theory of plate tectonics. Tharp is best known for her detailed seafloor maps that revealed a wealth of previously unknown features, including seamounts, trenches, transform faults, and most notably, the mid-ocean ridge system.

Tharp’s story is all the more compelling due to the adversity she overcame during her career—much of it related to her gender. Because Tharp didn’t always receive credit for her work, her contributions were initially overlooked. Fortunately, Hali Felt, the author of Tharp’s biography, and others have helped correct the record. “Marie wouldn’t have chosen to experience the gender discrimination that told her the humanities were a “better fit” and forced her to work in an office rather than the field,” says Felt in a recent EGU blog, “but the result was that she found her calling closer to home, and mapped 70 percent of the Earth’s surface in the process.”

This month, EGU is celebrating Tharp’s achievements, and those of all women geoscientists, through a series of posts, including one by the Tectonics and Structural Geology Division that revisits her legacy and its importance for laying the foundations of modern geology. EGU also spoke with six researchers working in the fields of ocean science, tectonics, and mapping to ask them what Marie Tharp’s work means to them personally, as well as to the future of ocean science and tectonic research. “Her life story is a burning, guiding light for me,” says marine geographer Dawn Wright.

We hope these articles will inspire all EGU members to help one another overcome whatever adversity we face. Tharp “succeeded in building a career that she loved, and was proud of,” says structural geologist Lucia Perez Diaz. “As a woman in science, I can’t imagine a better dream to work towards.”

Newsletter archive

Readers can access all previous issues of the newsletter from the archive below. Up until the end of 2014, the newsletter was a quarterly magazine and information service (first called The Eggs and then GeoQ).

EGU newsletter #67
EGU newsletter #67
EGU newsletter #66
EGU newsletter #66
EGU newsletter #65
EGU newsletter #65
EGU newsletter #64
EGU newsletter #64
EGU newsletter #63
EGU newsletter #63
EGU newsletter #62
EGU newsletter #62
EGU newsletter #61
EGU newsletter #61
EGU newsletter #60
EGU newsletter #60
EGU newsletter #59
EGU newsletter #59
EGU newsletter #58
EGU newsletter #58
EGU newsletter #57
EGU newsletter #57
EGU newsletter #56
EGU newsletter #56