GD Geodynamics Division on Geodynamics

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Geodynamics
gd.egu.eu

Division on Geodynamics

President: Paul Tackley (gd@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Jeroen van Hunen (jeroen.van-hunen@durham.ac.uk)

Studies related to the Geodynamics Division include all aspects of geodynamic processes in the lithosphere, mantle, and core. They encompass different approaches, including observations, imaging, theory, modelling (numerical simulations and laboratory experiments), and interpretation. Examples include the dynamics of subduction, mid-ocean-ridge processes, vertical and horizontal plate movements driving mountain building and basin formation, lithosphere dynamics, mantle convection, and core dynamics.

Recent awardees

Harro Schmeling

Harro Schmeling

  • 2020
  • Augustus Love Medal

The 2020 Augustus Love Medal is awarded to Harro Schmeling for his outstanding contributions to understanding the dynamics of the mantle, lithosphere and two-phase flow.


Tobias Keller

Tobias Keller

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Tobias Keller for outstanding scientific contributions related to understanding magma dynamics and igneous systems in the mantle and lithosphere, including the roles of volatiles and reactive flow.


Anne Davaille

Anne Davaille

  • 2019
  • Augustus Love Medal

The 2019 Augustus Love Medal is awarded to Anne Davaille for innovative experiments and analysis in fluid mechanics, which have created a new understanding of convective regimes within the mantles of the Earth and other planets and of their magmatic systems.


Anna Gülcher

Anna Gülcher

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Anna Gülcher The effects of rheological and tectonic parameters on the preservation of primordial reservoirs in Earth’s lower mantle: a numerical study


Paul Beguelin

Paul Beguelin

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Paul Beguelin Cerium -Hf-Nd-Sr-Pb isotope constraints on the Azores source composition and plume-rift interaction


Mathew Domeier

Mathew Domeier

  • 2019
  • Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists

The 2019 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists is awarded to Mathew Domeier for outstanding accomplishments in reconstructing tectonic plate evolution in the past 600 million years and in understanding the link between the evolution of plates and the deep Earth.

Latest posts from the GD blog

The Sassy Scientist – The Burning Question

The Sassy Scientist – The Burning Question

In the climb on the academic pyramid, Antonia wonders: How do you tell someone “you have not done enough to be included in the co-author list”? Dear Antonia, arranges Yoda robe: Big questions you have! Right place you came! I am sure you are not the first or the only scientist with that question. Since I feel generous today, I will leave here a template e-mail you can all copy and paste. I know, the world does not deserve my …


Watch and learn!

Watch and learn!

Too envious to watch Netflix’s Selling Sunset? Gone through the top 5 geodynamic movies? Lock-down vacation too boring for words? In need of useful procrastination? Search no longer! We have compiled an extensive list of online webinars and speaker series that were already active pre-Corona or saw the daylight during the pandemic to stay in touch with our colleagues both abroad and next door. Most of them are even recorded, so there to watch at your earliest convenience. Put on …


The Sassy Scientist – Out Of Orientation

The Sassy Scientist – Out Of Orientation

Ravi is done with his research, mentally. As he muses on a potential departure from academia – awaiting an unhackneyed sense of perspective – he asks: I want to leave academia! Where do I go? Dear Ravi, I am sorry to hear you’ve given thought to a termination of your academic career. After years of working in geodynamics, it sure shall be a great challenge to find new perspectives in life – and a tough change in lifestyle indeed. Before …


InSights into Mars’ interior

InSights into Mars’ interior

This week Ana-Catalina Plesa, Junior Research Group Leader at the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) in Berlin/Germany takes us on a journey to Mars. Enjoy the read about how spacecraft observations and numerical models provide InSight into the deep enigmas of the “red planet”. Over the course of its evolution, Mars has accumulated heat in its interior arising from the planet’s formation, differentiation, and the decay of radioactive isotopes. The heat is eventually transported to the surface and lost to space …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Thursday 30 July marks the centennial of the birth of Marie Tharp, a pioneering geologist and cartographer whose groundbreaking scientific contributions played a key role in the eventual acceptance of the theory of plate tectonics. Tharp is best known for her detailed seafloor maps that revealed a wealth of previously unknown features, including seamounts, trenches, transform faults, and most notably, the mid-ocean ridge system.

Tharp’s story is all the more compelling due to the adversity she overcame during her career—much of it related to her gender. Because Tharp didn’t always receive credit for her work, her contributions were initially overlooked. Fortunately, Hali Felt, the author of Tharp’s biography, and others have helped correct the record. “Marie wouldn’t have chosen to experience the gender discrimination that told her the humanities were a “better fit” and forced her to work in an office rather than the field,” says Felt in a recent EGU blog, “but the result was that she found her calling closer to home, and mapped 70 percent of the Earth’s surface in the process.”

This month, EGU is celebrating Tharp’s achievements, and those of all women geoscientists, through a series of posts, including one by the Tectonics and Structural Geology Division that revisits her legacy and its importance for laying the foundations of modern geology. EGU also spoke with six researchers working in the fields of ocean science, tectonics, and mapping to ask them what Marie Tharp’s work means to them personally, as well as to the future of ocean science and tectonic research. “Her life story is a burning, guiding light for me,” says marine geographer Dawn Wright.

We hope these articles will inspire all EGU members to help one another overcome whatever adversity we face. Tharp “succeeded in building a career that she loved, and was proud of,” says structural geologist Lucia Perez Diaz. “As a woman in science, I can’t imagine a better dream to work towards.”

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