Plunge (Credit: Ian Watkinson, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

GD Geodynamics Division on Geodynamics

EGU logo

European Geosciences Union

Division on Geodynamics
gd.egu.eu

Division on Geodynamics

President: Paul Tackley (gd@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Jeroen van Hunen (jeroen.van-hunen@durham.ac.uk)

Studies related to the Geodynamics Division include all aspects of geodynamic processes in the lithosphere, mantle, and core. They encompass different approaches, including observations, imaging, theory, modelling (numerical simulations and laboratory experiments), and interpretation. Examples include the dynamics of subduction, mid-ocean-ridge processes, vertical and horizontal plate movements driving mountain building and basin formation, lithosphere dynamics, mantle convection, and core dynamics.

Recent awardees

Irina M. Artemieva

Irina M. Artemieva

  • 2021
  • Augustus Love Medal

The 2021 Augustus Love Medal is awarded to Irina M. Artemieva for her outstanding research contributions to our understanding of the complex processes that control the evolution, thermal structure, stability, and dynamic topography of the continental lithosphere.


Mark J. Hoggard

Mark J. Hoggard

  • 2021
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2021 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Mark J. Hoggard for outstanding research in connecting observations at the Earth’s surface to its deep interior.


Harro Schmeling

Harro Schmeling

  • 2020
  • Augustus Love Medal

The 2020 Augustus Love Medal is awarded to Harro Schmeling for his outstanding contributions to understanding the dynamics of the mantle, lithosphere and two-phase flow.


Tobias Keller

Tobias Keller

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Tobias Keller for outstanding scientific contributions related to understanding magma dynamics and igneous systems in the mantle and lithosphere, including the roles of volatiles and reactive flow.

Latest posts from the GD blog

The Sassy Scientist – Out of Orbit

The Sassy Scientist – Out of Orbit

After reading last week’s post Ilona asks how to switch research topics to something more impactful during their lifetime: How do I transition from a PhD in mantle convection to a postdoc in satellite geodesy? Dear Ilona, What a moon-shot you are aiming for! But, have no fear, nothing is impossible. Undoubtedly, space is cool. And looking from a distance at our lovely rock spinning and floating through space is even cooler. Your career pivot is quite wise, as you …


The Indian Ocean Geoid Low at a plume-slab overpass

The Indian Ocean Geoid Low at a plume-slab overpass

In this week’s News & Views, Postdoc Elodie Kendall from GFZ Potsdam shares with us recent work on the mantle structures that could explain the Indian Ocean Geoid Low. What is the geoid, what does it look like and what can it tell us about mantle structure? The geoid is a model of the shape of the oceans’ surface if only gravity and Earth’s rotation acted on it and continued through the continents (the gravitational equipotential surface of Earth). Due …


The Sassy Scientist – #WriteProperly #NoMoreAcronyms

The Sassy Scientist – #WriteProperly #NoMoreAcronyms

Nerea cannot get enough of writing papers, reports and proposals. However, actually reading scribbles, especially those jotted down by (under)grad students, leaves her a histrionic gasp. She thus ejaculates: LLSVP or LLVP or LL(S)VP – why must we prolong the acronym wars? Aupa Nerea, The Americans. No doubt. It has got to be them. Just like so many things, they’ve ruined that beloved English language. Not that I have a qualm that needs quashing. Don’t be fooled by speculations of …


Rayleigh-Taylor instability in geodynamics

Rayleigh-Taylor instability in geodynamics

Flow against gravity is a common feature in the geodynamic phenomenon. In this week’s Geodynamics 101, Dip Ghosh from Jadavpur University Geodynamics Lab will explain the fundaments of Rayleigh-Taylor instability: A key to understanding the anti-gravity flow. It has long been realized that most of the geodynamic processes can be described in terms of slow viscous flow. Thus, like many other fields of earth and planetary sciences, geodynamics too owes a lot to fluid mechanics. In fact, two of the …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

In February The Loupe celebrates this month’s three successful missions to Mars, including the unique science and symbolism of the first Arab mission to the Red Planet. Because the data from this mission will be openly shared, it lets all scientists embark on an exciting journey to explore the secrets of our neighbouring planet’s atmosphere together. This issue features three EGU divisions: Geosciences Instrumentation and Data Systems (GI), Planetary and Solar System Sciences (PS), and Solar-Terrestrial Sciences (ST).

The Loupe also highlights everything you need to know about the vEGU21 scientific sessions, 5 key new initiatives the Union implemented in 2020, and two blogs with lighthearted tips for a greener EGU21 and some lessons you can take from this year’s virtual General Assembly to make your in-person conferences greener.

In addition to the latest Journal Watch and GeoRoundup of February EGU journal highlights, this issue also looks at what Union leaders hope they can achieve in the next few years and tackles the ‘rotten’ topic of how Europe should deal with its waste.

Find GD on

Subscribe to

Tweets by @EGU_GD