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Plunge (Credit: Ian Watkinson, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

GD Geodynamics Division on Geodynamics

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Geodynamics
gd.egu.eu

Division on Geodynamics

President: Jeroen van Hunen (gd@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Laetitia Le Pourhiet (laetitia.le_pourhiet@sorbonne-universite.fr)

Studies related to the Geodynamics Division include all aspects of geodynamic processes in the lithosphere, mantle, and core. They encompass different approaches, including observations, imaging, theory, modelling (numerical simulations and laboratory experiments), and interpretation. Examples include the dynamics of subduction, mid-ocean-ridge processes, vertical and horizontal plate movements driving mountain building and basin formation, lithosphere dynamics, mantle convection, and core dynamics.

Recent awardees

Taras Gerya

Taras Gerya

  • 2024
  • Augustus Love Medal

The 2024 Augustus Love Medal is awarded to Taras Gerya for his novel approach in using computational geodynamics to address outstanding tectonic and geodynamic questions in a way that reaches out to petrologists, geochemists, and structural geologists.


Anne Glerum

Anne Glerum

  • 2024
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2024 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Anne Glerum for her contributions in geodynamics, including providing new insight in the East African rift system, methodological advancement of geodynamic modelling techniques, and outstanding community service.


Thorsten W. Becker

Thorsten W. Becker

  • 2023
  • Augustus Love Medal

The 2023 Augustus Love Medal is awarded to Thorsten W. Becker for outstanding research contributions in regional and global geodynamics, seismology, tectonics, and earthquake source processes, and for scientific leadership and selfless service.


Ágnes Király

Ágnes Király

  • 2023
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2023 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Ágnes Király for her significant contributions in geodynamics, including contributions on viscous anisotropy in the mantle and new interactions between subduction and geological deformation and volcanism.


Philippa Slay

Philippa Slay

  • 2023
  • Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (OSPP) Award

The 2023 Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (OSPP) Award is awarded to Philippa Slay Observed Dynamic Topography and Cenozoic Magmatism of the Eastern Seaboard of Australia


Tinghong Zhou

Tinghong Zhou

  • 2023
  • Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (OSPP) Award

The 2023 Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (OSPP) Award is awarded to Tinghong Zhou Did the dynamo cease during the Ediacaran Period prior to inner core nucleation?

Latest posts from the GD blog

Two phase or not two phase

In this week’s blog Shi Joyce Sim from Georgia Institute of Technology shares the underlying science behind two-phase flow dynamics. A talk at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in March got me thinking. Basically, the presenter described how boundary layers grow over time, a phenomenon that cannot be captured using one dimensional models and necessitates modeling in higher dimensions. I was inspired by the talk to write this blog about a similar topic: when should we apply two-phase flow? …


Biogeodynamics – Let’s model the entire world!

All models are wrong, but some are useful – we all have heard this quote. But it raises several questions (including but not limited to) – What would a model of the entire world look like? Can you couple geodynamical models with climate and biological evolution models? Would these models be useful? In this week’s blog post, Timothy Gray, a PhD student from ETH Zürich is looking for answers to these questions, and sharing his experiences about doing a PhD …


Linking the Earth’s Engine and Landscape Formation and Evolution

The Earth’s internal engine drives several geodynamic processes such as continental rifting and dynamic topography, shaping mesmerizing landscapes. Through numerical modeling, insights into formations like the Continental Rift of Southeastern Brazil deepen our appreciation of Earth’s dynamic nature and the forces sculpting its surface. The heat engine beneath our feet Not so long ago, human history was marked by the steam engine, a symbol of the Industrial Revolution that had a revolutionary impact on our civilization. With the steam engine …


Exploring rheology of Earth’s materials: The marvels of high-temperature high-pressure deformation experiments

The Earth, with its towering mountains, shifting tectonic plates, and dynamic geological processes, has always been a subject of fascination and inquiry for scientists. Amidst the vast array of scientific disciplines, one relatively small yet impactful field, known as experimental rock deformation, plays a crucial role in unraveling the mysteries hidden beneath the Earth’s surface. Though the number of experimentalists is modest, the implications of their work extend far beyond the laboratory, influencing a myriad of scientific applications. This discipline …

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