Plunge (Credit: Ian Watkinson, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

GD Geodynamics Division on Geodynamics

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Geodynamics
gd.egu.eu

Division on Geodynamics

President: Paul Tackley (gd@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Jeroen van Hunen (jeroen.van-hunen@durham.ac.uk)

Studies related to the Geodynamics Division include all aspects of geodynamic processes in the lithosphere, mantle, and core. They encompass different approaches, including observations, imaging, theory, modelling (numerical simulations and laboratory experiments), and interpretation. Examples include the dynamics of subduction, mid-ocean-ridge processes, vertical and horizontal plate movements driving mountain building and basin formation, lithosphere dynamics, mantle convection, and core dynamics.

Recent awardees

Harro Schmeling

Harro Schmeling

  • 2020
  • Augustus Love Medal

The 2020 Augustus Love Medal is awarded to Harro Schmeling for his outstanding contributions to understanding the dynamics of the mantle, lithosphere and two-phase flow.


Tobias Keller

Tobias Keller

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Tobias Keller for outstanding scientific contributions related to understanding magma dynamics and igneous systems in the mantle and lithosphere, including the roles of volatiles and reactive flow.


Anne Davaille

Anne Davaille

  • 2019
  • Augustus Love Medal

The 2019 Augustus Love Medal is awarded to Anne Davaille for innovative experiments and analysis in fluid mechanics, which have created a new understanding of convective regimes within the mantles of the Earth and other planets and of their magmatic systems.


Anna Gülcher

Anna Gülcher

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Anna Gülcher The effects of rheological and tectonic parameters on the preservation of primordial reservoirs in Earth’s lower mantle: a numerical study


Paul Beguelin

Paul Beguelin

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Paul Beguelin Cerium -Hf-Nd-Sr-Pb isotope constraints on the Azores source composition and plume-rift interaction


Mathew Domeier

Mathew Domeier

  • 2019
  • Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists

The 2019 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists is awarded to Mathew Domeier for outstanding accomplishments in reconstructing tectonic plate evolution in the past 600 million years and in understanding the link between the evolution of plates and the deep Earth.

Latest posts from the GD blog

The mantle as seen from the core: more than a thermostat

The mantle as seen from the core: more than a thermostat

Geodynamics does not stop at the core-mantle boundary – the Earth’s outer core is a truly dynamic geosystem. This week Stefano Maffei (Research fellow) and Chris Davis (Associate Professor) from the School of Earth and Environment at the University of Leeds tell us more about the possible interplay between mantle and core and some of the remaining mysteries of the Earth’s magnetic field generation. Studying the Earth’s geomagnetic field is truly fascinating – and highly multidisciplinary. Behind a single magnetic …


The Sassy Scientist – Only Time Will Tell

The Sassy Scientist – Only Time Will Tell

Being a geophysicist, Eocenia is well aware of the fundamental cyclical rhythm of life – inbox time, coffee time, lunch time, nap time, scream-at-the-cluster time, tea time, pub time, late-night-coding time. But apparently stratigraphers just don’t accept this universal cycle, leaving us all with the question: When will geologists figure out time? Dear Eocenia, Ma or Myr? Either would make a passable baby’s nickname. But your reviewers will argue about the choice even more than the baby’s grandparents. As for …


Venus: science! Today!

Venus: science! Today!

After many (attempted) visits to Venus in an earlier era of space exploration, the focus of terrestrial planet science was shifted towards e.g. our other neighbour Mars. Yet, lately, Venus seems to gain scientific popularity and not without reason – there remains so much to figure out about the puzzling planet. The virtual mini-workshop ‘Venus Science Today’ was held a few weeks ago to bring together Venus researchers and discuss the latest discoveries. In today’s blog post, PhD student Anna …


The Sassy Scientist – The Story of Plate Tectonics

The Sassy Scientist – The Story of Plate Tectonics

As a new coping mechanism with reality, Sascha has been digging into some science history and asked: How did scientists discover plate tectonics? Dear Sascha, I do enjoy a good walk on the memory lane of scientific discoveries. You might know by now that great insight is gained when we look at data with fresh eyes. Hence, lots of advances in certain narrow scientific fields come from outsiders. In the story of plate tectonics you might have already heard about …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

As part of EGU’s Mineral Month, the September 2020 newsletter commemorates Friedrich Mohs, a German geologist who invented the Mohs Hardness Scale, thereby changing the way people study minerals to this very day. This issue also announces the upcoming EGU-European Parliament Intergroup virtual science-policy event, which will bring together geoscientists, policymakers, and industry representatives on 30 September to discuss how Earth, planetary, and space science researchers can support the European Green Deal.

Other upcoming events include the next EGU webinar on European Research Council grants, to be held on 19 October, and the annual EGU plenary meeting, which will be held virtually on 22 October.

The Loupe also features the latest EGU blogs, science policy news, and a call for new members of the Equality, Diversity and Inclusion Working Group. Be sure to apply by 21 October!

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