Plunge (Credit: Ian Watkinson, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

GD Geodynamics Division on Geodynamics

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Geodynamics
gd.egu.eu

Division on Geodynamics

President: Paul Tackley (gd@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Jeroen van Hunen (jeroen.van-hunen@durham.ac.uk)

Studies related to the Geodynamics Division include all aspects of geodynamic processes in the lithosphere, mantle, and core. They encompass different approaches, including observations, imaging, theory, modelling (numerical simulations and laboratory experiments), and interpretation. Examples include the dynamics of subduction, mid-ocean-ridge processes, vertical and horizontal plate movements driving mountain building and basin formation, lithosphere dynamics, mantle convection, and core dynamics.

Recent awardees

Harro Schmeling

Harro Schmeling

  • 2020
  • Augustus Love Medal

The 2020 Augustus Love Medal is awarded to Harro Schmeling for his outstanding contributions to understanding the dynamics of the mantle, lithosphere and two-phase flow.


Tobias Keller

Tobias Keller

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Tobias Keller for outstanding scientific contributions related to understanding magma dynamics and igneous systems in the mantle and lithosphere, including the roles of volatiles and reactive flow.

Latest posts from the GD blog

Rift linkage and rotating microplates

Rift linkage and rotating microplates

2020 left your head spinning? This week Derek Neuharth from GFZ Potsdam introduces us to the spinning microplates that can be found in extensional plate boundaries such as the East African Rift System and the East Pacific Rise. Divergent plate boundaries Microplates are enigmatic features that form in the boundaries between tectonic plates. Generally, plate boundary dynamics are divided into three types: 1) convergent boundaries where plates collide (e.g., Andes subduction zone; Sobolev & Babeyko, 2005), 2) transform boundaries where …


The Sassy Scientist – The Twelve Steps (of Academia)

The Sassy Scientist – The Twelve Steps (of Academia)

Furious yet disillusioned by a bunch of anonymous reviewers, of which most have provided zero insight through their nugatory reviews and displaying unambiguous bias towards a non-inflammatory, well-worded and a scientifically substantiated manuscript, Txabi demands to know: Why are many reviewers still insisting on anonymity? Dear Txabi, There is indeed such a segment of the academic community, which includes wayward scholars that adhere to the titillating thrill of anonymity. Unruly dweebs! In this day and age of unbridled sense of …


2021: 100th Year of the craton concept and beyond

2021: 100th Year of the craton concept and beyond

One hundred years back, Leopold Kober first introduced the term “Kratogen”. With time the concept of the idea of kratogen has evolved, and they are now known as cratons. In this week’s news and views, Jyotirmoy (@GeophyJo) from the Indian Institute of Science is discussing the history of craton science: how the concept evolved and the modern problems related to cratons. Etymology of craton J.D Dana was one of the first geologists to provide a geomorphological basis of a continent …


Announcing: The PhD Chronicles

Announcing: The PhD Chronicles

Hello and welcome back to the EGU Geodynamics blog in 2021! We are starting the new year of blogging with an exciting announcement: We will have a new monthly feature on the first Monday of the month called ‘The PhD Chronicles‘. Just pretend today is the first Monday of the month, please. It was right after New Year’s Eve, okay? I didn’t have time to write this sooner. Actually I did. I wrote it in December. Ha! Okay, on with …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Why is research in Antarctica so important? In this issue of The Loupe, EGU asks experts why they think it really matters. We also highlight blogs from each of the month’s featured EGU divisions: Climate: Past, Present & Future, Cryospheric Sciences, and Nonlinear Processes in Geosciences.

This issue also discusses the extensive fee waiver programme for vEGU21. The abstracts submission deadline is 13 January 2021 at 13:00 CET!

Last, but not least: for those scientists who tend to shop late, there’s the Top 5 (last-minute) gifts for geoscientists. From the ultimate sample collection kit to cake (no, really!), EGU has you covered with our last-minute guide. And the #1 gift? You’ll need to read the blog!

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