GD Geodynamics Division on Geodynamics

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Geodynamics
gd.egu.eu

Division on Geodynamics

President: Paul Tackley (gd@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Jeroen van Hunen (jeroen.van-hunen@durham.ac.uk)

Studies related to the Geodynamics Division include all aspects of geodynamic processes in the lithosphere, mantle, and core. They encompass different approaches, including observations, imaging, theory, modelling (numerical simulations and laboratory experiments), and interpretation. Examples include the dynamics of subduction, mid-ocean-ridge processes, vertical and horizontal plate movements driving mountain building and basin formation, lithosphere dynamics, mantle convection, and core dynamics.

Recent awardees

Harro Schmeling

Harro Schmeling

  • 2020
  • Augustus Love Medal

The 2020 Augustus Love Medal is awarded to Harro Schmeling for his outstanding contributions to understanding the dynamics of the mantle, lithosphere and two-phase flow.


Tobias Keller

Tobias Keller

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Tobias Keller for outstanding scientific contributions related to understanding magma dynamics and igneous systems in the mantle and lithosphere, including the roles of volatiles and reactive flow.


Anne Davaille

Anne Davaille

  • 2019
  • Augustus Love Medal

The 2019 Augustus Love Medal is awarded to Anne Davaille for innovative experiments and analysis in fluid mechanics, which have created a new understanding of convective regimes within the mantles of the Earth and other planets and of their magmatic systems.


Anna Gülcher

Anna Gülcher

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Anna Gülcher The effects of rheological and tectonic parameters on the preservation of primordial reservoirs in Earth’s lower mantle: a numerical study


Paul Beguelin

Paul Beguelin

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Paul Beguelin Cerium -Hf-Nd-Sr-Pb isotope constraints on the Azores source composition and plume-rift interaction


Mathew Domeier

Mathew Domeier

  • 2019
  • Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists

The 2019 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists is awarded to Mathew Domeier for outstanding accomplishments in reconstructing tectonic plate evolution in the past 600 million years and in understanding the link between the evolution of plates and the deep Earth.

Latest posts from the GD blog

The Sassy Scientist – Climate Change Causality

The Sassy Scientist – Climate Change Causality

Tom Doehne has been watching the news reports on the effects of climate change on human civilization. Dumbfounded that the main stream has not peered beyond the variable intensity of weather patterns and the mere notion of rising sea levels, he pondered: Will the increase in ocean level trigger more slippage along subduction zones? Dear Tom, In terms of geophysical research angles this really is a doozy. Human-induced increase in seismicity (rates) have been documented proficiently all around the world …


Science. Exploration. Survival.

A scientific career can be a struggle. This week Dave Stegman, Associate Professor at Scripps, draws parallels between being a scientist and being an Antarctic explorer. He dangled in the crevasse, unable to touch the sides; the abyss beneath was hundreds of feet deep; the rope he was suspended from was 14 feet long, connected above to the sledge he had been hauling. Was it luck when his sledge happened to get wedged at the top of the crevasse instead …


The Sassy Scientist – Science Sweethearts III

The Sassy Scientist – Science Sweethearts III

Athena is torn between desire and duty, and asks: What is your opinion on workplace romances? Dear Athena, Following the overwhelming success of the last two posts on workplace romance, this Valentine’s Day has prompted a return to the magic of poetry to answer this question. In the form of the villanelle this time. No, not the beloved character from the tv show or the novella series, but the French verse. Enjoy. Are you still in doubt whom to love …


post-AGU blues

post-AGU blues

Under the motto Better Late than Never, in today’s blog post we look back at the AGU 2019 Fall Meeting 2019. Last December (9-13th December) the AGU 2019 Fall Meeting took place during which Earth and Space scientists from all over the world gathered in San Francisco in the pursuit of high-quality science and a more sustainable future, through worthy discussions and networking. Whilst the previous two Fall Meetings had been relocated to New Orleans and Washington D.C., this time …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

We are looking forward to welcoming all participants to the 2020 EGU General Assembly on 3–8 May in Vienna. In addition to many exciting scientific sessions, the meeting will feature hundreds of short courses and networking events plus a packed exhibition hall!

The 2020 General Assembly will also continue a number of traditions, including the popular Imaggeo Photo Contest. You have until 15 February 2020 to enter your photos and videos for a chance to win fame and fortune – in the form of a free registration to next year’s General Assembly. Another tradition is the annual mentoring programme, which supports first-time conference attendees and helps them assemble their own professional networks. The programme, which only lasts for the duration of the General Assembly, depends on both mentors and mentees signing up; brief applications are due by 8 March 2020.

In case you missed them: here are the winners of the EGU's Best Blog Posts and the Best of Imaggeo 2019 competitions as well as the year’s Top 10 most-read blog posts. (The most read? Think Game of Thrones.)

Do you have a geoscience outreach project you’d like to develop? The call for funding is open until 15 February 2020 for EGU Public Engagement Grants. Winners receive 1500 EUR and one free registration to next year’s General Assembly.

If you’d like to organise a meeting addressing a focused, cutting-edge topic at the frontiers of geoscience research, you have until 29 February 2020 to propose an EGU Galileo Conference.

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