OS Ocean Sciences Division on Ocean Sciences

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Ocean Sciences
os.egu.eu

Division on Ocean Sciences

President: Karen Heywood (os@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Johan van der Molen (johan.van.der.molen@nioz.nl)

The Ocean Sciences Division of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) has the major objective to provide an attractive and productive environment for scientists from Europe and all over the world to gain progress in the various ocean science disciplines and have beneficial interactions with other fields of Geosciences. For that purpose, we organise with the teams of conveners the ocean science part of the program of the scientific conference that his held every year during the EGU General Assembly. We give special attention to topics cross-cutting with those of other divisions. We recognise deserving colleagues in various stages of their careers with our Award program: the division awards the Fritdjof Nansen Medal to mid or full career scientists and the Outstanding Young Scientists Award for younger scientists. We also award prices to outstanding student posters at every general assembly. The division maintains very strong links with the EGU publication committee, and especially with the board of Editors of the open access journal Ocean Science (OS) l. The division also contributes with the EGU Education and Outreach committee to the organisation of relevant topical conferences and summer schools.

Recent awardees

Richard J. Greatbatch

Richard J. Greatbatch

  • 2020
  • Fridtjof Nansen Medal

The 2020 Fridtjof Nansen Medal is awarded to Richard J. Greatbatch for pioneering contributions to geophysical fluid dynamics and theoretical oceanography, especially mesoscale eddy parameterisations.


Frédéric Le Moigne

Frédéric Le Moigne

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Frédéric Le Moigne for outstanding research in ocean biogeochemistry, particularly the vertical exchanges of organic carbon between the surface and the ocean’s interior: the biological carbon pump.


Anne-Marie Tréguier

Anne-Marie Tréguier

  • 2019
  • Fridtjof Nansen Medal

The 2019 Fridtjof Nansen Medal is awarded to Anne-Marie Tréguier for leading contributions to the numerical modelling of the eddying ocean from the global to the regional scale, and for crucially advancing the understanding of the influence of mesoscale eddies.


Peter Landschützer

Peter Landschützer

  • 2019
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2019 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Peter Landschützer for outstanding and game-changing contributions to the quantification of the evolving ocean carbon sink, its variation and its drivers.


Audrey Delpech

Audrey Delpech

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Audrey Delpech Mid-depth circulation in the tropical Pacific Ocean


Verónica Morales-Márquez

Verónica Morales-Márquez

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Verónica Morales-Márquez Relationship of extreme wave climate with long-term patterns in the North Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Thursday 30 July marks the centennial of the birth of Marie Tharp, a pioneering geologist and cartographer whose groundbreaking scientific contributions played a key role in the eventual acceptance of the theory of plate tectonics. Tharp is best known for her detailed seafloor maps that revealed a wealth of previously unknown features, including seamounts, trenches, transform faults, and most notably, the mid-ocean ridge system.

Tharp’s story is all the more compelling due to the adversity she overcame during her career—much of it related to her gender. Because Tharp didn’t always receive credit for her work, her contributions were initially overlooked. Fortunately, Hali Felt, the author of Tharp’s biography, and others have helped correct the record. “Marie wouldn’t have chosen to experience the gender discrimination that told her the humanities were a “better fit” and forced her to work in an office rather than the field,” says Felt in a recent EGU blog, “but the result was that she found her calling closer to home, and mapped 70 percent of the Earth’s surface in the process.”

This month, EGU is celebrating Tharp’s achievements, and those of all women geoscientists, through a series of posts, including one by the Tectonics and Structural Geology Division that revisits her legacy and its importance for laying the foundations of modern geology. EGU also spoke with six researchers working in the fields of ocean science, tectonics, and mapping to ask them what Marie Tharp’s work means to them personally, as well as to the future of ocean science and tectonic research. “Her life story is a burning, guiding light for me,” says marine geographer Dawn Wright.

We hope these articles will inspire all EGU members to help one another overcome whatever adversity we face. Tharp “succeeded in building a career that she loved, and was proud of,” says structural geologist Lucia Perez Diaz. “As a woman in science, I can’t imagine a better dream to work towards.”

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