GMPV Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology Division on Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology
gmpv.egu.eu

Division on Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology

President: Marian Holness (gmpv@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Evgenia Ilyinskaya (e.ilyinskaya@leeds.ac.uk)

The Geochemistry-Mineralogy-Petrology-Volcanology division includes disciplines that are fundamental to, but not restricted to studies of the solid earth. Important themes include the nature, composition, structure of the Earth’s mantle; the composition, origin and evolution of the oceanic and continental crust; the formation and crystallization of magmas; the chemical compositions of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks; element transfer between the surface envelopes of the earth; volcanoes and volcanism. While most of these studies fall in the realm of fundamental research, studies of pollution in the surface or subsurface waters, the formation of ore deposits, and the environmental impact of volcanism are examples of more applied research.


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The GMPV division collaborates with the VGP division of the American Geophysical Union, and with professional societies like the European Association of Geochemistry and the European Mineralogical Union.

Are you looking for a job within the GMPV see the Job listing sub page here.

Recent awardees

Holly J. Stein

Holly J. Stein

  • 2020
  • Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal

The 2020 Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal is awarded to Holly J. Stein in recognition of her pioneering development of the rhenium-osmium geochronometer and remarkable array of applications of Re-Os geochemistry.


Pilar Lecumberri-Sanchez

Pilar Lecumberri-Sanchez

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Pilar Lecumberri-Sanchez for groundbreaking research in the field of hydrothermal processes in the geosciences.


Daniela Rubatto

Daniela Rubatto

  • 2019
  • Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal

The 2019 Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal is awarded to Daniela Rubatto in recognition of fundamental and far-reaching accomplishments in metamorphic petrology, mineralogy, geochronology and tectonics.


Evangelos Moulas

Evangelos Moulas

  • 2019
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2019 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Evangelos Moulas for his research on understanding and quantifying the dynamic coupling of rock mechanics, solid state diffusion and metamorphic reactions.


Mahyra Tedeschi

Mahyra Tedeschi

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Mahyra Tedeschi Petrochronology of UHT garnet-free granulites: Linking zircon geochemistry to metamorphic reactions


Tom Winder

Tom Winder

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Tom Winder The importance of pre-existing structures and stresses to dike-induced earthquakes: The 2014-15 Bárðarbunga-Holuhraun rifting event, Iceland

Latests posts on the GMPV blog

Ask us (almost) anything: Were Chixculub and Deccan related?

Ask us (almost) anything: Were Chixculub and Deccan related?

Doc Rock from twitter asks Has anyone investigated the hypothesis that the Deccan Traps basalt flows came after, and were the result of, the Chixculub impact event, based on the DT basalts being on the exact opposite side of Earth at the time of the event? For context, the Chixculub crater is buried under the Yucatan peninsula in Mexico, and resulted from a meteorite impact that is widely believed to be associated with the mass extinction at the end of …


GMPV ECS online talk series 2: 4th August

GMPV ECS online talk series 2: 4th August

We’re back! After a short break, the Geochemistry, Minerology, Petrology and Volcanology division’s early career scientists talks will return on Tuesday 4th of August at 10am CEST. We have another four fascinating talks, covering a broad range of disciplines, methodologies and field locations! • Artur Ionescu (Babes-Bolyai University) – “Fluid geochemical studies in the Balkans: from planning up to results” • Alice Paine (Durham University) – “Searching for Quaternary volcanic signatures in high-resolution stalagmite datasets” • Nicholas Barber (University of …


That’s us! – The new GMPV ECS Team 2020/2021

That’s us! – The new GMPV ECS Team 2020/2021

Usually our blog posts are about fancy minerals and cool science, but today we want to use this platform to introduce you to our new GMPV ECS team for the term 2020/2021! First of all, what exactly are we doing here in the GMPV ECS team and why are we even existing?! – Well, the GMPV ECS team is a group of young researchers (themselves being ECS), who want to support young scientists at the beginnings of their careers. For …


#MINERALMONDAY: Bismuth

#MINERALMONDAY: Bismuth

It’s not so common for us to think about pure metals as minerals, or even crystals, but just like pinocchio could be a real boy, pure metals can be minerals too. This is because, if the metal cools down from a melt very slowly, layers of metal atoms can add onto previously solidified atoms, forming a defined lattice of atoms, and ta-dahh, it’s a single crystal! This is different from most metal that is melted then cast into a mold, …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Thursday 30 July marks the centennial of the birth of Marie Tharp, a pioneering geologist and cartographer whose groundbreaking scientific contributions played a key role in the eventual acceptance of the theory of plate tectonics. Tharp is best known for her detailed seafloor maps that revealed a wealth of previously unknown features, including seamounts, trenches, transform faults, and most notably, the mid-ocean ridge system.

Tharp’s story is all the more compelling due to the adversity she overcame during her career—much of it related to her gender. Because Tharp didn’t always receive credit for her work, her contributions were initially overlooked. Fortunately, Hali Felt, the author of Tharp’s biography, and others have helped correct the record. “Marie wouldn’t have chosen to experience the gender discrimination that told her the humanities were a “better fit” and forced her to work in an office rather than the field,” says Felt in a recent EGU blog, “but the result was that she found her calling closer to home, and mapped 70 percent of the Earth’s surface in the process.”

This month, EGU is celebrating Tharp’s achievements, and those of all women geoscientists, through a series of posts, including one by the Tectonics and Structural Geology Division that revisits her legacy and its importance for laying the foundations of modern geology. EGU also spoke with six researchers working in the fields of ocean science, tectonics, and mapping to ask them what Marie Tharp’s work means to them personally, as well as to the future of ocean science and tectonic research. “Her life story is a burning, guiding light for me,” says marine geographer Dawn Wright.

We hope these articles will inspire all EGU members to help one another overcome whatever adversity we face. Tharp “succeeded in building a career that she loved, and was proud of,” says structural geologist Lucia Perez Diaz. “As a woman in science, I can’t imagine a better dream to work towards.”

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