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European Geosciences Union

Division on Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology
gmpv.egu.eu

Division on Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology

President: Mike Burton (gmpv@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Andrea Di Muro (dimuro@ipgp.fr)

The Geochemistry-Mineralogy-Petrology-Volcanology division includes disciplines that are fundamental to, but not restricted to studies of the solid earth. Important themes include the nature, composition, structure of the Earth’s mantle; the composition, origin and evolution of the oceanic and continental crust; the formation and crystallization of magmas; the chemical compositions of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks; element transfer between the surface envelopes of the earth; volcanoes and volcanism. While most of these studies fall in the realm of fundamental research, studies of pollution in the surface or subsurface waters, the formation of ore deposits, and the environmental impact of volcanism are examples of more applied research.

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The GMPV division collaborates with the VGP division of the American Geophysical Union, and with professional societies like the European Association of Geochemistry and the European Mineralogical Union.

Are you looking for a job within the GMPV see the Job listing sub page here.

Join us for the EGU General Assembly 2018 in Vienna on the April 8-13.

Recent awardees

Andrew Putnis

Andrew Putnis

  • 2018
  • Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal

The 2018 Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal is awarded to Andrew Putnis for outstanding contributions to our understanding of mineral transformations and mineral-fluid interactions.


D. Graham Pearson

D. Graham Pearson

  • 2017
  • Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal

The 2017 Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal is awarded to D. Graham Pearson for outstanding contributions to our understanding of the sub-continental mantle, as well as innovations in geochemical techniques.


Pierre Lanari

Pierre Lanari

  • 2017
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award

The 2017 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientists Award is awarded to Pierre Lanari for outstanding research in thermodynamic modelling of metamorphic rocks, metamorphic petrology and geochronology. His wide skill-set has produced multiple scientific advances and allowed the development of new software tools.


Jonas Gliß

Jonas Gliß

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Jonas Gliß Pyplis* | A Python based software package for the analysis of volcanic SO2 emissions using UV SO2 cameras


Robert Holder

Robert Holder

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Robert Holder Titanite petrochronology of ultrahigh-temperature (UHT) calc-silicates from southern Madagascar: laser-ablation split-stream ICP-MS spot analyses and depth profiles; EPMA trace-element maps


Yuan-Kai Liu

Yuan-Kai Liu

  • 2017
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards

The 2017 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Awards is awarded to Yuan-Kai Liu Contemporaneous Ring Fault Activity and Surface Deformation at Subsiding Calderas studied using Analogue Experiments

Latests posts on the GMPV blog

Building a lava dome: one block at a time

Building a lava dome: one block at a time

Lava domes form when lava is extruded from a volcanic vent, but is too viscous to flow far away. Think of thick treacle that does not flow as easily as runny honey, and so when it is extruded, it forms a “lava pile” around the vent. Lava domes commonly form within the crater of a larger volcano (e.g. Mt. St. Helens), but can also stand alone or form part of a “dome complex”. A lava dome can take on a …


Living with volcanic gases

Living with volcanic gases

Professor Tamsin Mather, a volcanologist in Oxford’s Department of Earth Sciences reflects on her many fieldwork experiences at Masaya volcano in Nicaragua, and what she has learned about how they effect the lives of the people who live around them. Over the years, fieldwork at Masaya volcano in Nicaragua, has revealed many secrets about how volcanic plumes work and impact the environment, both in the here and now and deep into the geological past of our planet. Working in this …


A little fracture can go a long way: How experiments illuminate our understanding of volcanic eruptions

A little fracture can go a long way: How experiments illuminate our understanding of volcanic eruptions

What controls how violently a volcano erupts? Stratovolcanoes like Mount St Helens (USA), Gunung Merapi (Indonesia), or Volcán de Colima (Mexico) tend to erupt in two distinct ways: effusively and/or explosively. Effusive eruptions are eruptions where lava is extruded without any major explosions. Although effusive eruptions can be dangerous, at stratovolcanoes they tend to be restricted to volcanic craters and loss of life and property is relatively limited. On the other hand, explosive eruptions tend to be more catastrophic and …


Update on the Agung volcanic eruption in Indonesia

Update on the Agung volcanic eruption in Indonesia

Since our last blog, Agung has had two months to reflect and has recently begun a strong ash venting process, with incandescence visible at night in the summit. Updates from Magma Indonesia, the official communications hub for natural hazards in Indonesia, have highlighted an elevated level of volcanic tremor and an evacuation zone to 12 km radius around the volcano is being enforced. You can follow Magma Indonesia on twitter, and see regular updates on Agung. To the frustration of …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

With the EGU General Assembly just over a week away, we have a number of updates on the meeting, happening in Vienna from 8–13 April. Our conference organiser Copernicus has launched a great mobile app, and we recently announced a number of measures to reduce the environmental impact of the conference, from encouraging people to travel by train to introducing an option for participants to offset their carbon footprint. On the EGU blog, GeoLog, you can find posts about the city of Vienna, and a selection of Union-wide events, short courses and policy activities at the EGU General Assembly. For students taking part in the Outstanding Student Poster and PICO, there are also some tips from the judges on how to prepare a poster or PICO presentation.

This month, we have also announced that we are accepting nominations for EGU awards and medals. We encourage the EGU membership to consider gender, geographical and cultural balance when nominating outstanding Earth, planetary and space scientists at various career stages.

Last but not the least, we have also announced that we are launching two new publications at the 2018 General Assembly: a journal, Geoscience Communication, and a compilation, the Encyclopedia of Geosciences. Find these and many other EGU updates below.

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