GMPV Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology Division on Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology

EGU logo

European Geosciences Union

Division on Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology
gmpv.egu.eu

Division on Geochemistry, Mineralogy, Petrology & Volcanology

President: Marian Holness (gmpv@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Evgenia Ilyinskaya (e.ilyinskaya@leeds.ac.uk)

The Geochemistry-Mineralogy-Petrology-Volcanology division includes disciplines that are fundamental to, but not restricted to studies of the solid earth. Important themes include the nature, composition, structure of the Earth’s mantle; the composition, origin and evolution of the oceanic and continental crust; the formation and crystallization of magmas; the chemical compositions of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks; element transfer between the surface envelopes of the earth; volcanoes and volcanism. While most of these studies fall in the realm of fundamental research, studies of pollution in the surface or subsurface waters, the formation of ore deposits, and the environmental impact of volcanism are examples of more applied research.


pallasite

The GMPV division collaborates with the VGP division of the American Geophysical Union, and with professional societies like the European Association of Geochemistry and the European Mineralogical Union.

Are you looking for a job within the GMPV see the Job listing sub page here.

Recent awardees

Holly J. Stein

Holly J. Stein

  • 2020
  • Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal

The 2020 Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal is awarded to Holly J. Stein in recognition of her pioneering development of the rhenium-osmium geochronometer and remarkable array of applications of Re-Os geochemistry.


Pilar Lecumberri-Sanchez

Pilar Lecumberri-Sanchez

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Pilar Lecumberri-Sanchez for groundbreaking research in the field of hydrothermal processes in the geosciences.


Daniela Rubatto

Daniela Rubatto

  • 2019
  • Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal

The 2019 Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Medal is awarded to Daniela Rubatto in recognition of fundamental and far-reaching accomplishments in metamorphic petrology, mineralogy, geochronology and tectonics.


Evangelos Moulas

Evangelos Moulas

  • 2019
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2019 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Evangelos Moulas for his research on understanding and quantifying the dynamic coupling of rock mechanics, solid state diffusion and metamorphic reactions.


Mahyra Tedeschi

Mahyra Tedeschi

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Mahyra Tedeschi Petrochronology of UHT garnet-free granulites: Linking zircon geochemistry to metamorphic reactions


Tom Winder

Tom Winder

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Tom Winder The importance of pre-existing structures and stresses to dike-induced earthquakes: The 2014-15 Bárðarbunga-Holuhraun rifting event, Iceland

Latests posts on the GMPV blog

#MINERALMONDAY: Bismuth

#MINERALMONDAY: Bismuth

It’s not so common for us to think about pure metals as minerals, or even crystals, but just like pinocchio could be a real boy, pure metals can be minerals too. This is because, if the metal cools down from a melt very slowly, layers of metal atoms can add onto previously solidified atoms, forming a defined lattice of atoms, and ta-dahh, it’s a single crystal! This is different from most metal that is melted then cast into a mold, …


#MINERALMONDAY: Zdenĕkite, way too pretty to mine

#MINERALMONDAY: Zdenĕkite, way too pretty to mine

One of the saddest things for mineralogists is to see beautiful minerals crushed to extract their valuable contents, but often, without mining, we don’t get to see these minerals in the first place. Mineral hunters often scrounge around in the big piles of waste rock from mines, because the machines used for smashing up rock do a much better job of exposing minerals than a geological hammer ever could. And, some of the most beautiful minerals are associated with some …


Volcanic Lightning: Impacts on plume-suspended ash particles

Volcanic Lightning: Impacts on plume-suspended ash particles

By Franziska Keller, PhD student at the Institute for Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH Zürich Volcanic lightning is a common phenomenon related to explosive volcanism, often rattling down in a spectacle of hundreds of lightning strikes within a single eruptive event. Apart from its spectacular appearance, lightning can also be used as helpful tool to detect and monitor volcanic activity in remote locations on Earth and potentially on other planets, and is even questioned to have influenced the formation of life …


#MINERALMONDAY – we’re back with baksanite!

#MINERALMONDAY – we’re back with baksanite!

#MINERALMONDAY: your weekly dose of minerals every* Monday (* excluding the last few months of Mondays…). A lot of bad things have happened since the start of the year, but perhaps the least important of these is the complete lack of minerals every Monday. Don’t worry, we are back, and what better way to start than with baksanite, Bi6Te2S3. Why baksanite? Well, for the sake of sounding like ‘back’, it was either that or bakhchisaraitsevite, and I gave up trying …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

This month EGU issued an important statement condemning racism—and all other forms of discrimination—anywhere in the world and re-asserting our commitment to improving equality of opportunity, diversity and inclusion both within and beyond the geosciences.

A crucial component of anti-racism is sustaining a productive conversation about issues related to equality, diversity and inclusion. In keeping with EGU’s bottom-up structure and philosophy, we welcome diverse voices and opinions and encourage all geoscientists to constructively express their thoughts. In response to recent events, numerous individuals and groups have done so, including:

In celebration of Pride Month, EGU also published an article about risks to safety and other issues that LGBTQIA+ geoscientists face while conducting fieldwork in certain countries.

Since EGU’s founding, the organisation has worked to ensure equitable treatment for everyone in our community. Through our Equality, Diversity and Inclusion working group, we are working towards our stated goals to increase diversity at EGU events and on EGU committees and boards, and we pledge to continue to foster diversity to advance fundamental and applied geoscience research—to the benefit of the Earth and all humanity.

Find GMPV on

Subscribe to

Tweets by @EGU_GMPV