TS Tectonics and Structural Geology Division on Tectonics and Structural Geology

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Tectonics and Structural Geology
ts.egu.eu

Division on Tectonics and Structural Geology

President: Claudio Rosenberg (ts@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Paola Vannucchi (paola.vannucchi@unifi.it)

The Division on Tectonics and Structural Geology (TS) investigates rock deformation at all scales with the aim to decipher its complex relationships with earth dynamics. We use natural observations, including mapping, remote sensing and seismics, and experimental methods. The division is highly interdisciplinary, with strong ties with other EGU divisions including GD, EMRP, SM, SSP, GM, G, and GMPV.

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News

10. April 2019

Outstanding ECS Award 2019 and Poster Awards 2018

Today Daniel Pastor-Galán received the Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award of the TS Division and Loes van Dam and Luca dal Zilio were awarded the TS Division's Poster Award for their presentations at the General Assembly 2018. Congratulations!

Daniel Pastor-Galán Received the OECS Award


10. April 2019

TS Division Meeting

You can be part of shaping the way forward for the TS Division by joining the Division Meeting today at 12:45–13:45 in Room K2.

 


09. April 2019

Serge Lallemand to receive Stefan Mueller Medal!

Congratulations to Serge Lallemand for receiving the Stephan Mueller Medal!

Serge Lallemand receives the Stefan Mueller Medal

 


05. April 2019

Welcome to Vienna!

Welcome to Vienna! The General Assembly 2019 will kick off on Sunday evening at 18:30 with the opening reception in Foyer F. You can pick up your badges from 12:00 on in hall X.2. If you haven't done so yet, now is a good time to put together your personal program and install the egu2019 app on your phone. Enjoy your stay!

 


07. January 2019

Abstract submission: 3 days left!

The new year starts off with the deadline for the EGU 2019 General Assembly approaching on January 10th. If you haven't done so, please consider submitting an abstract to one of our many exciting TS sessions. Only 2019 EGU members will be able to submit abstracts as first author to the 2019 meeting and, with a few exceptions outlined below, only one abstract as first author will be permitted.

for more information click here.

 


25. October 2018

Call for abstracts to the EGU 2019 General Assembly now open!

The EGU 2019 General Assembly, taking place in Vienna (Austria) on 7–12 April 2019, will bring together geoscientists from all over the world to one meeting covering all disciplines of the Earth, planetary and space sciences. The deadline for abstract submission is 10 January 2019 or, for those applying for Roland Schlich travel support, 1 December 2018. Only 2019 EGU members will be able to submit abstracts as first author to the 2019 meeting and, with a few exceptions outlined below, only one abstract as first author will be permitted.

for more information click here.

 


23. October 2018

EGU annonced winners of next years medals

The The EGU announced the winners of next years medals. The winners in the TS division are Serge Lallemand, who is awarded the Stephan Mueller Medal and Daniel Pastor-Galán, who receives the Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award.

Congratulation!

 

02. October 2018

Call for Abstracts

The abstract submission for EGU General Assembly 2019 will be openend on 22. October 2018. Time to start thinking about your contributions! 

The submission link will be provided once available.

 

29. June 2018

Call for Session Proposals

The next EGU General Assembly 2019 (EGU2019) will be held at the Austria Center Vienna (ACV) from 07 to 12 April 2019. The call for session proposals is now open until 06 September 2018. If you have a good idea for a session that fits the TS division objectives, please go ahead and propose one! You can do this at: https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2019/provisionalprogramme

NEW IN 2019

a) For the first time, the skeleton programme consists only of the programme groups and their sub-programme groups. The programme groups do not show sessions from last year. This means that all session proposals need to be submitted, also those on classic topics in the community.

b) The deadline for suggesting Union Symposia and Great Debates is 15 August 2018. Please see the guidelines (https://www.egu2019.eu/guidelines/us_and_gdb_guidelines.html) for more information.

 

12. April 2018

ECS Award Lecture by Fabio Corbi

Today Fabio Corbi will present his TS Division Outstanding ECS Lecture with the title "On the relationship between interseismic coupling and earthquake slip pattern". Join us for this great event at 11:45 in room K1! 

 

11. April 2018

TS Division Meeting

The Division Meeting for Tectonics and Structural Geology (TS) is happening today at 12:15 in room D2. The community is strongly encouraged to join, meet the TS board, learn about our activity and participate in improving EGU.

 

8. April 2018

EGU General Assembly 2018 opening today

EGU 2018 is starting today! The registration is open from 12:00 on in hall X5 opposite the main entrance. The opening reception starts at 18:30 in the foyer of the main building. We wish you all a save journey to Vienna.

 


Click here for the news archive.

Recent awardees

Mathilde Cannat

Mathilde Cannat

  • 2020
  • Stephan Mueller Medal

The 2020 Stephan Mueller Medal is awarded to Mathilde Cannat for her invaluable contributions to the understanding of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of mid-ocean ridges and the formation of oceanic crust.


Christoph von Hagke

Christoph von Hagke

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Christoph von Hagke for his wide-ranging contributions to the kinematics and dynamics of plate boundaries, their interactions with foreland basins, and with magma transport.


Serge Lallemand

Serge Lallemand

  • 2019
  • Stephan Mueller Medal

The 2019 Stephan Mueller Medal is awarded to Serge Lallemand for fundamental analyses of the tectonics of convergent plate margins through careful combinations of natural observations with experiments.


Daniel Pastor-Galán

Daniel Pastor-Galán

  • 2019
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2019 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Daniel Pastor-Galán for his research on the origin of oroclines and the tectonic evolution of Palaeotethys and Panthalassa ocean interface during the Pangea amalgamation.


Alex Hughes

Alex Hughes

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Alex Hughes A new quantitative approach in modelling regional tectonic processes and syn-depositional systems in coupled analogue-numerical models


Hans Jørgen Kjøll

Hans Jørgen Kjøll

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Hans Jørgen Kjøll Deep section of a Neoproterozoic fossil magma rich rifted margin exposed

Latest posts from the TS blog

Features From the Field: Pencil Cleavage

Features From the Field: Pencil Cleavage

This edition of ‘Features from the field’ is brought to you by Sandra McLaren, a senior lecturer at the University of Melbourne. She will be talking about type of rock formation called “Pencil Cleavage” so called because it looks like pencils. Sandra even has a small collection of pencil/crayon shale which is the cover image of this post. I have seen quite a range of different size pencils in a number of locations. If they are short and stubby, I …


100 years of Marie Tharp – The woman who mapped the ocean floor and laid the foundations of modern geology

100 years of Marie Tharp – The woman who mapped the ocean floor and laid the foundations of modern geology

Marie Tharp (July 30, 1920 – August 23, 2006) would have turned 100 on this very day and she continues to live through her legacy of having mapped the world’s oceans. Similar to famous painters, some of whom only gain appreciation after their death, Marie Tharp is one of the most underappreciated scientists in the history of the earth sciences. Marie was born in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Due to her father’s work as soil surveyor for the US Bureau of Soils, …


Istanbul: The city across two continents

Istanbul: The city across two continents

Istanbul – an economic, cultural, and historic centre. Its unique geography, natural resources and beauty have drawn the attention of not only geoscientists but also poets, merchants, painters, sculptors, architects, kings and emperors for centuries. Throughout its history, the city has witnessed the rise and fall of some of the world’s greatest empires. Owing to its geopolitically important location, once conquered, Istanbul was commonly chosen as the capital city. This is the reason why Istanbul is also known by 48 …


Mind your head: The Imposter Syndrome

Mind your head: The Imposter Syndrome

This Mind Your Head blog post is a follow-up from one of the talks during the online short course on mental health that aired during the last EGU General Assembly. Imposter syndrome is about the feeling of being afraid to be found to be an imposter. Note that I do not claim to be an expert; in the following, I simply list a few tricks that help me, and people I have talked to, to find their way in stressful …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Thursday 30 July marks the centennial of the birth of Marie Tharp, a pioneering geologist and cartographer whose groundbreaking scientific contributions played a key role in the eventual acceptance of the theory of plate tectonics. Tharp is best known for her detailed seafloor maps that revealed a wealth of previously unknown features, including seamounts, trenches, transform faults, and most notably, the mid-ocean ridge system.

Tharp’s story is all the more compelling due to the adversity she overcame during her career—much of it related to her gender. Because Tharp didn’t always receive credit for her work, her contributions were initially overlooked. Fortunately, Hali Felt, the author of Tharp’s biography, and others have helped correct the record. “Marie wouldn’t have chosen to experience the gender discrimination that told her the humanities were a “better fit” and forced her to work in an office rather than the field,” says Felt in a recent EGU blog, “but the result was that she found her calling closer to home, and mapped 70 percent of the Earth’s surface in the process.”

This month, EGU is celebrating Tharp’s achievements, and those of all women geoscientists, through a series of posts, including one by the Tectonics and Structural Geology Division that revisits her legacy and its importance for laying the foundations of modern geology. EGU also spoke with six researchers working in the fields of ocean science, tectonics, and mapping to ask them what Marie Tharp’s work means to them personally, as well as to the future of ocean science and tectonic research. “Her life story is a burning, guiding light for me,” says marine geographer Dawn Wright.

We hope these articles will inspire all EGU members to help one another overcome whatever adversity we face. Tharp “succeeded in building a career that she loved, and was proud of,” says structural geologist Lucia Perez Diaz. “As a woman in science, I can’t imagine a better dream to work towards.”

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