Helvetic Nappes of Switzerland (Credit: Kurt Stuewe, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

TS Tectonics and Structural Geology Division on Tectonics and Structural Geology

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Tectonics and Structural Geology
ts.egu.eu

Division on Tectonics and Structural Geology

President: Claudio Rosenberg (ts@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Paola Vannucchi (paola.vannucchi@unifi.it)

The Division on Tectonics and Structural Geology (TS) investigates rock deformation at all scales with the aim to decipher its complex relationships with earth dynamics. We use natural observations, including mapping, remote sensing and seismics, and experimental methods. The division is highly interdisciplinary, with strong ties with other EGU divisions including GD, EMRP, SM, SSP, GM, G, and GMPV.

News

10. April 2019

Outstanding ECS Award 2019 and Poster Awards 2018

Today Daniel Pastor-Galán received the Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award of the TS Division and Loes van Dam and Luca dal Zilio were awarded the TS Division's Poster Award for their presentations at the General Assembly 2018. Congratulations!


10. April 2019

TS Division Meeting

You can be part of shaping the way forward for the TS Division by joining the Division Meeting today at 12:45–13:45 in Room K2.

 


09. April 2019

Serge Lallemand to receive Stefan Mueller Medal!

Congratulations to Serge Lallemand for receiving the Stephan Mueller Medal!

 


05. April 2019

Welcome to Vienna!

Welcome to Vienna! The General Assembly 2019 will kick off on Sunday evening at 18:30 with the opening reception in Foyer F. You can pick up your badges from 12:00 on in hall X.2. If you haven't done so yet, now is a good time to put together your personal program and install the egu2019 app on your phone. Enjoy your stay!

 


07. January 2019

Abstract submission: 3 days left!

The new year starts off with the deadline for the EGU 2019 General Assembly approaching on January 10th. If you haven't done so, please consider submitting an abstract to one of our many exciting TS sessions. Only 2019 EGU members will be able to submit abstracts as first author to the 2019 meeting and, with a few exceptions outlined below, only one abstract as first author will be permitted.

for more information click here.

 


25. October 2018

Call for abstracts to the EGU 2019 General Assembly now open!

The EGU 2019 General Assembly, taking place in Vienna (Austria) on 7–12 April 2019, will bring together geoscientists from all over the world to one meeting covering all disciplines of the Earth, planetary and space sciences. The deadline for abstract submission is 10 January 2019 or, for those applying for Roland Schlich travel support, 1 December 2018. Only 2019 EGU members will be able to submit abstracts as first author to the 2019 meeting and, with a few exceptions outlined below, only one abstract as first author will be permitted.

for more information click here.

 


23. October 2018

EGU annonced winners of next years medals

The The EGU announced the winners of next years medals. The winners in the TS division are Serge Lallemand, who is awarded the Stephan Mueller Medal and Daniel Pastor-Galán, who receives the Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award.

Congratulation!

 

02. October 2018

Call for Abstracts

The abstract submission for EGU General Assembly 2019 will be openend on 22. October 2018. Time to start thinking about your contributions! 

The submission link will be provided once available.

 

29. June 2018

Call for Session Proposals

The next EGU General Assembly 2019 (EGU2019) will be held at the Austria Center Vienna (ACV) from 07 to 12 April 2019. The call for session proposals is now open until 06 September 2018. If you have a good idea for a session that fits the TS division objectives, please go ahead and propose one! You can do this at: https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2019/provisionalprogramme

NEW IN 2019

a) For the first time, the skeleton programme consists only of the programme groups and their sub-programme groups. The programme groups do not show sessions from last year. This means that all session proposals need to be submitted, also those on classic topics in the community.

b) The deadline for suggesting Union Symposia and Great Debates is 15 August 2018. Please see the guidelines (https://www.egu2019.eu/guidelines/us_and_gdb_guidelines.html) for more information.

 

12. April 2018

ECS Award Lecture by Fabio Corbi

Today Fabio Corbi will present his TS Division Outstanding ECS Lecture with the title "On the relationship between interseismic coupling and earthquake slip pattern". Join us for this great event at 11:45 in room K1! 

 

11. April 2018

TS Division Meeting

The Division Meeting for Tectonics and Structural Geology (TS) is happening today at 12:15 in room D2. The community is strongly encouraged to join, meet the TS board, learn about our activity and participate in improving EGU.

 

8. April 2018

EGU General Assembly 2018 opening today

EGU 2018 is starting today! The registration is open from 12:00 on in hall X5 opposite the main entrance. The opening reception starts at 18:30 in the foyer of the main building. We wish you all a save journey to Vienna.

 


Click here for the news archive.

Recent awardees

Mathilde Cannat

Mathilde Cannat

  • 2020
  • Stephan Mueller Medal

The 2020 Stephan Mueller Medal is awarded to Mathilde Cannat for her invaluable contributions to the understanding of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of mid-ocean ridges and the formation of oceanic crust.


Christoph von Hagke

Christoph von Hagke

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Christoph von Hagke for his wide-ranging contributions to the kinematics and dynamics of plate boundaries, their interactions with foreland basins, and with magma transport.

Latest posts from the TS blog

Features from the Field: Shear Zones and Mylonites

Features from the Field: Shear Zones and Mylonites

The San Andreas Fault in California, the Alpine Fault in New Zealand, or the Main Frontal Thrust in the Himalayas are some of the most famous and largest fault zones that accommodate the relative displacement between two adjacent crustal blocks. Such faults, however, represent only the shallower expression of something much bigger: a crustal shear zone. In the first 10 kilometers or so of the crust, rocks are cold (usually below 300 °C) and tend to fracture when subject to …


TS Must Read – Ramsay (1980): Shear zone geometry: a review

TS Must Read – Ramsay (1980): Shear zone geometry: a review

Ramsay’s 1980 important contribution is a practical and theoretical handbook about shear zones, where the reader can find a detailed classification of shear zones, their description, and mathematical explanation. A definition of the concept of shear zones opens the article, followed by the shear zones classification into three types, namely brittle (e.g., Fig. 1a), brittle-ductile (e.g., Fig. 1b), and ductile. For each shear zone, Ramsay lists its characteristic geometrical features according to their displacement field, which is in turn determined …


TS Must-Read – Brace and Kohlstedt (1980): Limits on Lithospheric Stress Imposed by Laboratory Experiments

TS Must-Read – Brace and Kohlstedt (1980): Limits on Lithospheric Stress Imposed by Laboratory Experiments

In 1980 Brace and Kohlstedt published a short paper that constrains the strength of continental lithosphere by extrapolating laboratory measurements of rock strength to geological conditions. Their approach follows earlier work by Goetze and Evans (1979) and relies on two key considerations. First, the brittle strength is given by the frictional strength of rocks following Byerlee’s law (Byerlee, 1978). With this assumption, one can calculate the pressure-dependent increase of the lithospheric stress with depth, and account for the strength-reducing effect …


#OnTheRocks – Because Earth is just beautiful!

#OnTheRocks – Because Earth is just beautiful!

From the time the first Kodak camera in 1888 went on sale we can say with confidence a geologist somewhere was trying to capture field photographs. We love to capture the beauty of the field and every geologist has a story to tell. The EGU would like to connect these stories globally in our new #OnTheRocks series. #OnTheRocks will produce a compilation of geological photographs on different scales (everything from thin sections to field photographs to satellite images) and the …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Why is research in Antarctica so important? In this issue of The Loupe, EGU asks experts why they think it really matters. We also highlight blogs from each of the month’s featured EGU divisions: Climate: Past, Present & Future, Cryospheric Sciences, and Nonlinear Processes in Geosciences.

This issue also discusses the extensive fee waiver programme for vEGU21. The abstracts submission deadline is 13 January 2021 at 13:00 CET!

Last, but not least: for those scientists who tend to shop late, there’s the Top 5 (last-minute) gifts for geoscientists. From the ultimate sample collection kit to cake (no, really!), EGU has you covered with our last-minute guide. And the #1 gift? You’ll need to read the blog!

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