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Nature's fireworks (Credit: Derya Gürer, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

NH Natural Hazards Division on Natural Hazards

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Natural Hazards
nh.egu.eu

Division on Natural Hazards

President: Ira Didenkulova (nh@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Paolo Tarolli (paolo.tarolli@unipd.it)

The Natural Hazards (NH) Division of the EGU covers all the geological and geophysical processes that can be hazardous and can produce damage to the environment and to the society. Therefore it is a place where scientists and researchers of various geo-disciplines meet with sociologists, economists and people responsible for territorial and urban defense and planning policies. The aim is to improve the understanding of the evolution of the processes and to discuss new technologies, methods and strategies to mitigate their disastrous effects. The Division is structured in nine Subdivisions covering specific hazards. Of these seven are listed here: hydro-meteorological, volcanic, landslide, earthquake-, sea and ocean, remote sensing and hazards, wildfire hazards. The eighth Subdivision covers biological and environmental hazards and in addition hazards not included in the previous ones. The ninth (natural hazards and society) focuses on the social aspects of the hazards, including development sustainability, emergency, warning, after-disaster resilience, etc. Most of the topics that are treated in the NH Division are also treated in other EGU Divisions, which is expected due to the intrinsic transversal nature of the NH Division. For example, earthquakes are the main interest of the Seismology Division, but they are also of interest here where the chief topics are, among others, how to evaluate vulnerability and risk, how to reduce the  impact on human lives and society, how geo-scientists can contribute to a prompt recovery of a community affected by disasters.

The NH Division is one the historical Divisions of the EGU that was established since when EGU was founded and has been and is one of the largest divisions to which many geo-scientists provide steadily contributions of papers and ideas over the years.

As for all EGU Divisions, an Early Career Scientist Award is established also for the NH Division and is given to young researchers who obtain outstanding results in the assessment and mitigation of natural hazard adopting a multidisciplinary approach. In addition, the NH Division awards the Plinius Medal devoted since 2012 to mid-career researchers and the Soloviev Medal for scientists who give outstanding contributions in fundamental aspects of research on natural hazards.

Recent awardees

Fausto Guzzetti

Fausto Guzzetti

  • 2021
  • Sergey Soloviev Medal

The 2021 Sergey Soloviev Medal is awarded to Fausto Guzzetti for his fundamental contributions to the field of natural hazards and his remarkable efforts to link the scientific community and civil protection authorities to mitigate risk for exposed populations.


Giuliano Di Baldassarre

Giuliano Di Baldassarre

  • 2021
  • Plinius Medal

The 2021 Plinius Medal is awarded to Giuliano Di Baldassarre for outstanding research on the interplay between hydrological hazards and society, and significant contributions to the development of policy for the mitigation of floods and droughts.


Maria Pregnolato

Maria Pregnolato

  • 2021
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2021 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Maria Pregnolato for her outstanding research in the field of flood impacts, flood risk assessment, and infrastructure resilience.


Claire J. Horwell

Claire J. Horwell

  • 2020
  • Plinius Medal

The 2020 Plinius Medal is awarded to Claire J. Horwell for her outstanding interdisciplinary research on the respiratory health implications of volcanic aerosols, including ash, minerals and liquid droplets.


John J. Clague

John J. Clague

  • 2020
  • Sergey Soloviev Medal

The 2020 Sergey Soloviev Medal is awarded to John J. Clague for his remarkable scientific contributions in fundamental and applied research on earthquakes, tsunamis, outburst floods and landslides, directed towards risk reduction for the benefit of societies.


Vitor Silva

Vitor Silva

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Vitor Silva for his fundamental contributions to the research on earthquake risk assessment.

Latest posts from the NH blog

The road to successful scientific writing for early-career scientists

The world of research is highly competitive, and early career scientists face many challenges while trying to carve out a successful career path. Writing scientific articles is one of those challenges. Prof. Paolo Tarolli (University of Padova) shared his personal experience on “How to write a scientific article” with 130 attendees last 7th September, during the first Campfire event, “Soft skills for soft lunches – NH series“, organised by the ECS group of the EGU Natural Hazards Division. Paolo has …


Natural Hazards 101: Forecasting and modelling

With the Natural Hazards 101 series, we mean to bring our readers closer to the terminology often used in the field of natural hazards, but that may not be so familiar. In the first episode of the series, we focused on the definition of hazard and natural hazard. We moved then to the concept of risk, which brought us to define exposure and vulnerability. Later on, we digested the disaster terminology provided by the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk …


Meet and greet with the Natural hazards Early career scientists Team – NhET

Do you know that there is a Natural Hazards team of clever, fun and friendly early career scientists? This team takes care of the blog you are reading (and we hope enjoying) and organises and helps with sessions, short courses and great debates during the EGU General Assembly. Moreover, we created a network of early to mid-career scientists from different disciplines and backgrounds of the Natural Hazards that serves as support and contact point. Do you need someone with skills …


Paving the way for climate resilience: what can we learn from the coronavirus pandemic?

Even though significant epidemics and pandemics have been recorded many times throughout human history, the Covid-19 pandemic demonstrated how vulnerable our societies still are. While the consequences of the pandemic are still ongoing, the global response so far can potentially offer some insights to support climate change response. Undoubtedly, the world is already experiencing a wide range of changes in the climate, from slow onset events, like sea-level rise, desertification and loss of biodiversity to climate extremes like deadly heatwaves, …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

In the August issue of The Loupe learn all about what geodesy is and why it’s so important from Geodesy Division Early Career Scientist co-representative Rebekka Steffen and find out our Top 5 Tips for getting a great science photograph to accompany your research publication or science communication! You can also watch the free recording of our special webinar about Ocean Conservation with Rebecca Helm, available now on our YouTube channel.

Don’t forget that time is running out to submit your #EGU22 scientific session proposal or short course idea; the deadline for submissions is Monday 6 September 2021 so don’t delay, submit today

In addition to the latest Journal Watch and GeoRoundup of August EGU journal highlights, this issue also reminds members to nominate yourself or others for the upcoming Council positions by 15 September.

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