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Nature's fireworks (Credit: Derya Gürer, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

NH Natural Hazards Division on Natural Hazards

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Natural Hazards
nh.egu.eu

Division on Natural Hazards

President: Ira Didenkulova (nh@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Heidi Kreibich (heidi.kreibich@gfz-potsdam.de)

The Natural Hazards (NH) Division covers all the geological and geophysical processes that can be hazardous and can produce damage to the environment and to the society. Therefore it is a place where scientists and researchers of various geo-disciplines meet with sociologists, economists and people responsible for territorial and urban defence and planning policies. The aim is to improve the understanding of the evolution of the processes and to discuss new technologies, methods and strategies to mitigate their disastrous effects. The division is structured in nine subdivisions covering specific hazards. Of these seven are listed here: hydro-meteorological, volcanic, landslide, earthquake-, sea and ocean, snow-avalanche- and glacial, wildfire hazards. The eighth subdivision covers biological and environmental hazards and in addition hazards not included in the previous ones. The ninth (natural hazards and society) focuses on the social aspects of the hazards, including development sustainability, emergency, warning, after-disaster resilience, etc. Most of the topics that are treated in the NH Division are also treated in other EGU divisions, which is expected due to the intrinsic transversal nature of the NH Division.

The NH Division is one the historical Divisions of the EGU that was established since when EGU was founded and has been and is one of the largest divisions to which many geo-scientists provide steadily contributions of papers and ideas over the years.

As for all EGU Divisions, an Early Career Scientist Award is established also for the NH Division and is given to young researchers who obtain outstanding results in the assessment and mitigation of natural hazard adopting a multidisciplinary approach. In addition, the NH Division awards the Plinius Medal devoted since 2012 to mid-career researchers and the Soloviev Medal for scientists who give outstanding contributions in fundamental aspects of research on natural hazards.

Recent awardees

Alberto Viglione

Alberto Viglione

  • 2023
  • Plinius Medal

The 2023 Plinius Medal is awarded to Alberto Viglione for seminal contributions to understanding and assessing hydrological extremes.


Peng Cui

Peng Cui

  • 2023
  • Sergey Soloviev Medal

The 2023 Sergey Soloviev Medal is awarded to Peng Cui for his high-level career in research and applications on debris flows and other mountain hazards, and his leadership on disaster risk reduction in adherence with the Sendai Framework.


Ankit Agarwal

Ankit Agarwal

  • 2023
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2023 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Ankit Agarwal for his distinguished work in complexity science for better understanding, quantifying and predicting hydroclimatic extremes.


Anne Mangeney

Anne Mangeney

  • 2022
  • Sergey Soloviev Medal

The 2022 Sergey Soloviev Medal is awarded to Anne Mangeney for unique contributions to the understanding of geohazards by integrating novel modelling approaches with field and laboratory observations, and the transfer of knowledge towards risk assessment.


Slobodan Nickovic

Slobodan Nickovic

  • 2022
  • Plinius Medal

The 2022 Plinius Medal is awarded to Slobodan Nickovic for pioneering work on modelling sand and dust storms and for significant contributions to the development of a global dust advisory and warning system.


Christian Grimm

Christian Grimm

  • 2022
  • Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (OSPP) Award

The 2022 Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (OSPP) Award is awarded to Christian Grimm Advancing the ETAS Model to Improve Forecasts of Earthquake Sequences and Doublets


Ingrid Bjørge-Engeland

Ingrid Bjørge-Engeland

  • 2022
  • Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (OSPP) Award

The 2022 Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (OSPP) Award is awarded to Ingrid Bjørge-Engeland Observations by ASIM of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes accompanied by Elves


Joan Villalonga

Joan Villalonga

  • 2022
  • Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (OSPP) Award

The 2022 Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (OSPP) Award is awarded to Joan Villalonga Observational characterization of meteotsunami triggering in the Balearic Islands from an ultra-dense observational network


Wazita Scott

Wazita Scott

  • 2022
  • Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (OSPP) Award

The 2022 Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (OSPP) Award is awarded to Wazita Scott Weather circulation patterns associated with extreme precipitation events over Italy


Yuchen He

Yuchen He

  • 2022
  • Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (OSPP) Award

The 2022 Outstanding Student and PhD candidate Presentation (OSPP) Award is awarded to Yuchen He A numerical and experimental study of Galilei-transformed nonlinear wave groups


Jakob Zscheischler

Jakob Zscheischler

  • 2022
  • Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists

The 2022 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists is awarded to Jakob Zscheischler for fundamental work of an international standing, defining and developing models for the identification and risk assessment of compound and inter-related hazards, in a changing climate.

Latest posts from the NH blog

Writing successful research proposal: tips and tricks

Have you arrived at that moment in your career when you have some potential ideas that you think would be relevant to science? Do you need financial support to advance your science career, and decided to apply for a grant? Today’s blog post brings you a good starting point with advice from three grant winners during the campfire organised by the NH ECS division team: “Writing successful research proposals: tips and tricks”. The first speaker, Madeleine Vickers, from the Centre …


COVID-19 and natural hazards: a complex multi-risk scenario

COVID-19 has been a disruptive ‘tsunami’ that most countries were not prepared to handle. The pandemic has been representing a global slow-onset long-lasting disaster that has drastically challenged all emergency management systems worldwide. The pandemic slow-onset disaster has been characterized by a prolonged emergency phase with varying intensity levels, and a cyclic behavior, where the interpandemic, alert, pandemic, and transition phases [1] alternated for more than two years. In the first phases of the pandemic spread, the level of preparedness …


Reducing housing vulnerability to natural hazards – Interview with Dr Eefje Hendriks

The impact of natural hazards on vulnerable communities can be devastating, causing fatalities, damaging houses and livelihoods, and pushing people into poverty. These disasters make them even more vulnerable. A growing line of research identifies actions and tools to reduce vulnerability and make communities more resilient. An interesting and crucial part of this research investigates the role of housing in the vulnerability to hazards. We talk today about this promising research field with Dr Eefje Hendriks. Eefje is currently an …


Getting to know NH11: Climate Hazards, the new EGU Natural Hazards Sub-Division

Earlier this year, the EGU Natural Hazards Division launched a new sub-division dedicated to climate hazards. In today’s interview, Dr Steven Hardiman, a Senior Research Scientist at the Met Office (UK) and the Science Officer of this new sub-division, will share some insights about NH11 and its future development. Hi Steve, and congratulations on your new role! Please tell us about your career and field of research I work on global-scale atmospheric dynamics, teleconnections, and regional climate prediction. After completing …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

In the January newsletter, researchers explore creative ways to involve non-technical audiences in space studies. An EGU funded outreach project called A Touch of Space Weather is teaching space science to blind and visually impaired children while space plasma physicist Martin Archer shares how researchers can engage more people with space sciences.

We also hear from EGU Head of Communications Hazel Gibson who tells us what we could expect from the European Space Agency’s new JUICE mission. Find out more on EGU blogs now!

As a reminder, registrations are now open for EGU23! Remember to check your inbox for the next monthly Update from our conference organiser Copernicus, arriving early February. If you miss an Update you can find them here where you can subscribe to receive them going forward.

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