Top of clouds (Credit: Jean-Luc Baray, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

AS Atmospheric Sciences Division on Atmospheric Sciences

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Atmospheric Sciences
as.egu.eu

Division on Atmospheric Sciences

President: Athanasios Nenes (as@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Annica Ekman (annica@misu.su.se)

Atmospheric Sciences Division is one of the largest divisions in the European Geosciences Union. The research areas covered by division extend from the large-scale dynamical/meteorological processes and systems in the atmosphere (like cyclones and global atmosphere circulation) to the small scale turbulent mixing, they cover the time frame from centuries (in connection with climate research) to seconds (in the context of fast chemistry). Atmospheric Sciences include studies of the atmosphere composition, aerosol and cloud physics, gas-particles interactions and chemical reaction kinetics studied in the labs.

Recent awardees

Spyros N. Pandis

Spyros N. Pandis

  • 2021
  • Vilhelm Bjerknes Medal

The 2021 Vilhelm Bjerknes Medal is awarded to Spyros N. Pandis for his outstanding contributions to atmospheric sciences and establishing our understanding of aerosol formation and its processes.


Anita L. Ganesan

Anita L. Ganesan

  • 2021
  • Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists

The 2021 Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Early Career Scientists is awarded to Anita L. Ganesan for innovative and impactful work on greenhouse gas and ozone-depleting substance estimation through a combination of modelling and measurements.


Michael J. Prather

Michael J. Prather

  • 2020
  • Vilhelm Bjerknes Medal

The 2020 Vilhelm Bjerknes Medal is awarded to Michael J. Prather for groundbreaking developments in chemistry-transport modelling, establishing a theoretical framework to elucidate the role of reactive species in climate forcing, and improving environmental policy.


Meng Gao

Meng Gao

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Meng Gao for original contributions to the understanding of haze pollution formation in highly polluted regions and its interactions with climate.

Latest posts from the AS blog

Using cloud microphysics to predict thunderstorms: How modelling of atmospheric electricity could save lives

Using cloud microphysics to predict thunderstorms: How modelling of atmospheric electricity could save lives

The last three decades were the warmest in the history of meteorological observations in Europe. Temperature rise is accompanied by an increase in the frequency and magnitude of extreme weather and climatic events, which are the main risks for population and environment associated with modern climate change. An important class of such phenomena includes severe rainfall, tornadoes, squalls, and thunderstorms. Given that extreme weather is expected to be the “new norm” in our rapidly changing climate, developing a forecast capability …



Community Effort to explore the Papers that shaped Tropospheric Chemistry

Community Effort to explore the Papers that shaped Tropospheric Chemistry

The genesis of the idea to explore the influence of papers on shaping the field of tropospheric chemistry came when editing a textbook chapter I had written a decade earlier. As I edited it I thought, what really is new; text-book worthy over the last 10 years? In some senses what is text-book worthy? These type of questions inspired me to think about where atmospheric chemistry has got to as a subject and to wonder if one where to ask …


A new European effort to better understand extreme weather

A new European effort to better understand extreme weather

Feature Image: Screenshot of the european weather Extremes: DrIvers, Predictability and Impacts (EDIPI) homepage. Background Image Credits: Copernicus Sentinel data, processed by ESA. Extreme weather events routinely have detrimental socio-economic impacts around the globe. In fact, weather-related events make up over 90% of natural disasters worldwide [1]. In the new millennium, the frequency of many extreme weather events such as droughts and high temperatures, has systematically exceeded the levels seen in the 1980s and 1990s [1], and anthropogenic climate change …

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

In February The Loupe celebrates this month’s three successful missions to Mars, including the unique science and symbolism of the first Arab mission to the Red Planet. Because the data from this mission will be openly shared, it lets all scientists embark on an exciting journey to explore the secrets of our neighbouring planet’s atmosphere together. This issue features three EGU divisions: Geosciences Instrumentation and Data Systems (GI), Planetary and Solar System Sciences (PS), and Solar-Terrestrial Sciences (ST).

The Loupe also highlights everything you need to know about the vEGU21 scientific sessions, 5 key new initiatives the Union implemented in 2020, and two blogs with lighthearted tips for a greener EGU21 and some lessons you can take from this year’s virtual General Assembly to make your in-person conferences greener.

In addition to the latest Journal Watch and GeoRoundup of February EGU journal highlights, this issue also looks at what Union leaders hope they can achieve in the next few years and tackles the ‘rotten’ topic of how Europe should deal with its waste.

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