AS Atmospheric Sciences Division on Atmospheric Sciences

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European Geosciences Union

Division on Atmospheric Sciences
as.egu.eu

Division on Atmospheric Sciences

President: Athanasios Nenes (as@egu.eu)
Deputy President: Annica Ekman (annica@misu.su.se)

Atmospheric Sciences Division is one of the largest divisions in the European Geosciences Union. The research areas covered by division extend from the large-scale dynamical/meteorological processes and systems in the atmosphere (like cyclones and global atmosphere circulation) to the small scale turbulent mixing, they cover the time frame from centuries (in connection with climate research) to seconds (in the context of fast chemistry). Atmospheric Sciences include studies of the atmosphere composition, aerosol and cloud physics, gas-particles interactions and chemical reaction kinetics studied in the labs.

Recent awardees

Michael J. Prather

Michael J. Prather

  • 2020
  • Vilhelm Bjerknes Medal

The 2020 Vilhelm Bjerknes Medal is awarded to Michael J. Prather for groundbreaking developments in chemistry-transport modelling, establishing a theoretical framework to elucidate the role of reactive species in climate forcing, and improving environmental policy.


Meng Gao

Meng Gao

  • 2020
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2020 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Meng Gao for original contributions to the understanding of haze pollution formation in highly polluted regions and its interactions with climate.


Johannes Lelieveld

Johannes Lelieveld

  • 2019
  • Vilhelm Bjerknes Medal

The 2019 Vilhelm Bjerknes Medal is awarded to Johannes Lelieveld for eminent and diverse scientific contributions and international leadership in atmospheric research in the Earth system approach, including pioneering studies linking air pollution with health.


Gabriele Messori

Gabriele Messori

  • 2019
  • Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award

The 2019 Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award is awarded to Gabriele Messori for seminal contributions to the understanding of planetary wave-breaking phenomena, atmospheric extreme events and the energetics of the climate system using dynamical systems theory.


Ashish Kumar

Ashish Kumar

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Ashish Kumar Speciation of 49 C2-C10 NMHCs during the post-harvest paddy residue fire emission period in the N.W. Indo Gangetic Plain using Thermal Desorption Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detection (TD-GC-FID)


Felipe Lobos Roco

Felipe Lobos Roco

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Felipe Lobos Roco Evapotranspiration (ET) enhanced by advection in the Atacama Desert, ET-DATA field experiment


Iris Thurnherr

Iris Thurnherr

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Iris Thurnherr How air-sea interactions are modulated by synoptic weather systems: a stable water isotope perspective


Katrin Müller

Katrin Müller

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Katrin Müller Balloon-borne Tropospheric Ozone Measurements from a New Station in Palau (Tropical West Pacific)


Lejish Vettikkat

Lejish Vettikkat

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Lejish Vettikkat Quantification of BVOC emission flux from Swietenia macrophylla King using a Dynamic Branch Cuvette and PTR-MS


Roland Rohloff

Roland Rohloff

  • 2019
  • Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award

The 2019 Outstanding Student Poster and PICO (OSPP) Award is awarded to Roland Rohloff Measurements of HOx in the outflow of convective systems

Current issue of the EGU newsletter

Thursday 30 July marks the centennial of the birth of Marie Tharp, a pioneering geologist and cartographer whose groundbreaking scientific contributions played a key role in the eventual acceptance of the theory of plate tectonics. Tharp is best known for her detailed seafloor maps that revealed a wealth of previously unknown features, including seamounts, trenches, transform faults, and most notably, the mid-ocean ridge system.

Tharp’s story is all the more compelling due to the adversity she overcame during her career—much of it related to her gender. Because Tharp didn’t always receive credit for her work, her contributions were initially overlooked. Fortunately, Hali Felt, the author of Tharp’s biography, and others have helped correct the record. “Marie wouldn’t have chosen to experience the gender discrimination that told her the humanities were a “better fit” and forced her to work in an office rather than the field,” says Felt in a recent EGU blog, “but the result was that she found her calling closer to home, and mapped 70 percent of the Earth’s surface in the process.”

This month, EGU is celebrating Tharp’s achievements, and those of all women geoscientists, through a series of posts, including one by the Tectonics and Structural Geology Division that revisits her legacy and its importance for laying the foundations of modern geology. EGU also spoke with six researchers working in the fields of ocean science, tectonics, and mapping to ask them what Marie Tharp’s work means to them personally, as well as to the future of ocean science and tectonic research. “Her life story is a burning, guiding light for me,” says marine geographer Dawn Wright.

We hope these articles will inspire all EGU members to help one another overcome whatever adversity we face. Tharp “succeeded in building a career that she loved, and was proud of,” says structural geologist Lucia Perez Diaz. “As a woman in science, I can’t imagine a better dream to work towards.”

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