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Bayi Glacier in Qilian Mountain, China (Credit: Xiaoming Wang, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Job advertisement Postdoc Positions in Space Plasma Physics

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Postdoc Positions in Space Plasma Physics

Position
Postdoc Positions in Space Plasma Physics

Employer

Queen Mary University of London

Homepage: https://www.qmul.ac.uk


Location
London, United Kingdom of Great Britain – England, Scotland, Wales

Sector
Academic

Relevant divisions
Nonlinear Processes in Geosciences (NP)
Solar-Terrestrial Sciences (ST)

Type
Contract

Level
Experienced

Salary
£38,165 - £49,785 per annum

Required education
PhD

Application deadline
31 December 2023

Posted
17 November 2023

Job description

We are advertising three new postdoc positions to join our growing Space & Astrophysical Plasmas group at QMUL. The available positions cover spacecraft observations, numerical simulations, plasma theory, and laboratory experiments in areas of heliospheric physics, magnetospheric physics, fundamental plasma processes, and space weather. Further detail on the positions, along with application information is given below.

Role of fundamental plasma processes in shaping the near-Earth space environment
Application deadline: 31st December 2023
Contact: Dr Christopher Chen (christopher.chen@qmul.ac.uk)
Application link and more information: https://www.qmul.ac.uk/jobs/vacancies/items/9054.html
Description: One position is available to work in Dr Christopher Chen’s research team on the STFC Consolidated Grant project “Plasma physics of the Earth’s magnetosheath”. The research involves primarily space data analysis, with supporting theory & simulation, to study a range of fundamental plasma processes, such as turbulence / waves / instabilities / reconnection / kinetic physics / wave-particle interactions, to reveal how they operate and shape near-Earth space. The work will involve both single and multi-spacecraft analysis, e.g. using MMS, and develop techniques in preparation for future missions such as NASA Helioswarm and ESA Plasma Observatory. This will be a collaborative effort, together with Dr Chen’s broader research team, the group at QMUL, and multiple leading international collaborators. The research programme also offers extensive dedicated career support for all team members

Role of plasma turbulence in heliophysics, space weather, and lab experiments
Application deadline: 31st December 2023
Contact: Dr Christopher Chen (christopher.chen@qmul.ac.uk)
Application link and more information: https://www.qmul.ac.uk/jobs/vacancies/items/9056.html
Description: One position is available to work in Dr Christopher Chen’s UKRI Future Leaders Fellowship (FLF) team on the research programme “Exploring New Regions of Space: Fundamentals and Impacts of Astrophysical Plasma Turbulence”. The research involves space data analysis, lab plasma experiments, theory & simulation, so applicants with expertise in any of these areas (and interest in getting involved in the others) are encouraged. The research aims are to understand turbulence as a fundamental process in space/lab/astrophysics, the role it plays in controlling the dynamics of these systems, and modelling its effects, including space weather, in the heliosphere and more distant astrophysical plasmas. This is a highly collaborative team effort, involving interlinking (and flexible) sub-projects, and multiple leading international project partners. The FLF programme also offers extensive dedicated career support for all team members.

Turbulence as a controlling agent in the inner heliosphere
Application deadline: 31st December 2023
Contact: Prof David Burgess (D.Burgess@qmul.ac.uk)
Application link and more information: https://www.qmul.ac.uk/jobs/vacancies/items/9108.html
Description: A postdoctoral researcher position is available to work on a project exploring the controlling role that turbulence plays in the inner heliosphere primarily using plasma simulations. The post is funded by STFC as part of a Consolidated Grant. The project will use plasma simulations to study how turbulence can control the key plasma processes of particle energization, shock dynamics, and turbulence-driven reconnection. The simulations will be motivated and tested against results from Parker Solar Probe (PSP), Solar Orbiter and Magnetospheric Multiscale MMS. The project will build on collaborations within the Space Plasma group and there will be opportunities for collaborations across the data/simulation boundary.